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Old 05-10-2016, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,093 posts, read 15,900,406 times
Reputation: 9139

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The idicocy of this thread can be summed up in one word: MILLENIALS!

And if I were to venture a guess, the majority of these *kids* dissing on the suburbs in fact grew up in the suburbs. So this isn't really about ITP vs OTP as it is "getting as far away from mom and dad as I possibly can."

Also, children ... there's a lot to be said for being able to see stars at night, or fall asleep with your windows open to the sound of crickets, or seeing a family of deer in your yard at twilight. You may not appreciate these things now, but you will one day in life ... if you're lucky enough to live that long.

Last edited by Newsboy; 05-10-2016 at 01:53 PM..
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Old 05-10-2016, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,889,791 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Also, children ... there's a lot to be said for being able to see stars at night, or fall asleep with your windows open to the sound of crickets, or seeing a family of deer in your hard at twilight. You may not appreciate these things now, but you will one day in life ... if you're lucky enough to live that long.
This year I've seen more coyotes from my house (7) than deer (1).
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Old 05-10-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,889 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Wrong, Smyrna is not 'very walkabkle' It is car-oriented development with some drive-to urbanism in there. It is still dominated by strip malls that force peds to cross parking lots, as well as high speed roads that make it uncomfortable for peds to walk next to.
Funny, there are sections of Smyrna that have the same housing stock and of the same era on the same size lots as Kirkwood.
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Duluth, GA
1,132 posts, read 878,978 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Funny, there are sections of Smyrna that have the same housing stock and of the same era on the same size lots as Kirkwood.
So, what you're saying is that Smyrna has a little of both?
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,889,791 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJDeadParrot View Post
So, what you're saying is that Smyrna has a little of both?
Smyrna (incorporated in 1872), like Marietta, Austell, and other areas that were independent towns before becoming suburbs, has an older section that fits a more walkable pattern surrounded by newer development that may or may not follow a walkable pattern. Some of the newest mixed use developments are also pretty walkable.

It's hard to make generalizations about an area that has highly variable history and development patterns.

It's the same in other metro areas. I grew up in Minnetonka, MN (incorporated 1956), which is a classic residential community built up in the 50's through the 90's, and that area has some business districts like Glen Lake but is otherwise solid housing. Other suburbs, like the adjacent Hopkins (founded 1852, incorporated 1893), was a small town over 10 miles from the Minneapolis city limits a century ago, and it still has a main street, is organized into blocks, and has a Raspberry Festival every year that has been happening since 1935. So suburbs can vary tremendously even in the same part of the same metro area. Atlanta is no different.

That why I find generalizations about "suburbs" to be so annoying.

Last edited by rcsteiner; 05-10-2016 at 02:19 PM..
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:23 PM
 
28,101 posts, read 24,632,008 times
Reputation: 9523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forhall View Post
The biggest issue I have with suburbs is that most homes are contained in subdivisions where every home was built at the same time, for the same price range, using basically the same materials. You essentially get a grouping of 100+ homes all based on 4 or 5 blueprints with a few minor variations like moving a window to a different side or changing the roof color. It's so very boring. Everything just feels very cheap and Mcmansiony. Like everyone's trying too hard. Very different feel from going to the winding roads of the wealthier in town neighborhoods like Virginia highland or morningside where every home is classic and tasteful, distinct in its own way.
Don't forget that in the 1910-30 era, subdivisions (now referred to as "intown neighborhoods") were built the same way.

The land was often clear cut and the houses were generally put up at the same time, typically with the same plans and the same materials.

Many houses from that era literally came out of the Sears catalog.

Were those people "trying too hard"?

See, e.g., 1923 Sears Modern Home - Kit House - Sunbeam - Craftsman Bungalow with Colonial Revival Influence




Here's Ansley Park under construction. This was typical for early subdivisions:


Last edited by arjay57; 05-10-2016 at 02:31 PM..
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,140,747 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Funny, there are sections of Smyrna that have the same housing stock and of the same era on the same size lots as Kirkwood.
Yes, but unlike Smyrna Kirkwood is served by reliable transit and does not have roads with 45 speed limit.
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,140,747 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Don't forget that in the 1910-30 era, subdivisions (now referred to as "intown neighborhoods") were built the same way.

The land was often clear cut and the houses were generally put up at the same time, typically with the same plans and the same materials.

Many houses from that era literally came out of the Sears catalog.

Were those people "trying too hard"?

See, e.g., 1923 Sears Modern Home - Kit House - Sunbeam - Craftsman Bungalow with Colonial Revival Influence




Here's Ansley Park under construction. This was typical for early subdivisions:
2 bedrooms and 1 bath? How did anyone survive that life.
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:41 PM
 
980 posts, read 549,901 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
A couple of weekends ago I was at a house warming party in Flowery Branch for a recently married couple both in their twenties. Other than a few middle-aged couples such as my wife and I everyone else was a millennial. All of the millennials at that event live OTP. The sense of shame hanging over them was palpable. They know that all of the cool kids live ITP and the shame of living OTP hung like a pall. I mean Flowery Branch, really?

Actually it was an enjoyable party and a good time was had by all since no one ever asks themselves, "Gee I wonder whether -thomass and other pretentious dweebs approve of where I choose to live?"
Lmao
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Old 05-10-2016, 02:50 PM
 
980 posts, read 549,901 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
The idicocy of this thread can be summed up in one word: MILLENIALS!

And if I were to venture a guess, the majority of these *kids* dissing on the suburbs in fact grew up in the suburbs. So this isn't really about ITP vs OTP as it is "getting as far away from mom and dad as I possibly can."

Also, children ... there's a lot to be said for being able to see stars at night, or fall asleep with your windows open to the sound of crickets, or seeing a family of deer in your yard at twilight. You may not appreciate these things now, but you will one day in life ... if you're lucky enough to live that long.
Or you can go to YouTube and type in "deer"
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