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Old 09-02-2016, 08:24 PM
 
1,796 posts, read 6,074,851 times
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Poor judgment by a young teacher - especially in our current racially charged climate. This was her second time presenting the lesson. Whether the kids take in everything via "screens" or not, so what. Sensitive topics such as these should be taught from a book or how about taking a field trip to a museum? The children should not be re-enacting anything.

Of course the child is not going to say their true feelings to the teacher. How many children let alone adults are able to articulate feelings in an obviously emotionally charged environment?

Last edited by oldhousegirl; 09-02-2016 at 09:31 PM..
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:53 AM
 
27,786 posts, read 24,814,471 times
Reputation: 16505
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhousegirl View Post
Poor judgment by a young teacher - especially in our current racially charged climate. This was her second time presenting the lesson. Whether the kids take in everything via "screens" or not, so what. Sensitive topics such as these should be taught from a book or how about taking a field trip to a museum? The children should not be re-enacting anything.

Of course the child is not going to say their true feelings to the teacher. How many children let alone adults are able to articulate feelings in an obviously emotionally charged environment?
It wasn't a re-enactment; it was a virtual simulation. Not the same thing.
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Old 09-03-2016, 06:50 AM
 
Location: atlanta
3,966 posts, read 4,562,154 times
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I just wanted to come back and clarify that I'm not black, so I don't get to decide what's offensive or not to a black person. Is anyone in this thread black? I felt justified in the above post but didn't really bother to ask around and see how s black person would view this, since I don't experience racism maybe I've got a blind spot here.
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Old 09-03-2016, 07:44 AM
 
27,786 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
I just wanted to come back and clarify that I'm not black, so I don't get to decide what's offensive or not to a black person. Is anyone in this thread black? I felt justified in the above post but didn't really bother to ask around and see how s black person would view this, since I don't experience racism maybe I've got a blind spot here.
Since I was born.
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Old 09-03-2016, 01:41 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,547,981 times
Reputation: 4045
I guess I just stick to the boring lesson plan to be safe. You can't take risks in teaching sensitive subjects in today's world of instant and constant over communication. If it was 1990 no one outside of Cobb County would have heard about this and if someone actually did complain it would have blown over very quickly. Now ever corner of the universe chimes in on everything and blows it out of the water. I'm sure this teacher had every intention of creating a memorable learning experience for her students and completely engaged them in the lesson, but it looks like she will be paying for attempting it...I guarantee she won't try anything like this again.

I think if it had been me, with only one black student in the classroom, I would have probably avoided the whole thing. But it's a shame for students to miss out on a great learning experience because parents/guardians have a problem with the lesson.
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Old 09-03-2016, 02:08 PM
 
28,148 posts, read 24,679,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
I think if it had been me, with only one black student in the classroom,
Sounds like there were four black students (out of 23), and also some hispanic students.
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Old 09-03-2016, 02:12 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,547,981 times
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Sounds like there were four black students (out of 23), and also some hispanic students.
Oh I thought the article said one. I must have misread it. I wonder if it would have been okay if the entire class was white? Or if the teacher was black? There are a lot of variables that might make the perception of racism disappear.
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Old 09-03-2016, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,283 posts, read 49,833,895 times
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I have to agree with living it out being the best way to learn.
This is slightly different, but something my history teacher did one day really got to me (must have - I remember 28 years later).
We were in the 7th grade honors history. Sitting at our desks. Normal class. One kid had a hat on.

The teacher told him to take his hat off.
The kid said no.
This was a particularly historically obnoxious kid. Smart but mouthy.
The teacher raised his voice a little and told him to take it off again.
Again the kid said no. And gave him a little lip about how he had a right, blah blah.

The teacher jumped up suddenly, rushed to the kid's desk, upturned it so he fell out of it, and yanked the hat off his head, all the while bellowing and thundering. We were all floored. And scared. The upside down desk, the cowering boy on the floor, the red-faced man clutching a hat...

The teacher blinked for a second, shook his head, and stammered,

"Hey, guys. This was bad. This was real bad. I'm sorry. I'm so sorry. I'm going to take {kid's name} to the office. Um, I need you guys to go ahead and write down what happened. What you saw. So we can tell Principal So-and-so."

And they left, both visibly shaken.


Well, of course the whole thing was a ruse.

Afterwards, my teacher read all the different descriptions we had written of what had happened. It was AMAZING to see the differences in perspective and just details of what went on in the descriptions.

Taught me that anything that happens has many sides and is described differently by different people and you may not get the whole story or even the right story from any one person or even an entire group! History, as we learn it, is very changed from when it happened. There are facts and impressions but everything is filtered through the witnesses.

I think these reenactments can only serve to help kids better understand what went on. Hearing someone else describe something is nowhere near being there yourself. Or even pretending to be there.
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Old 09-03-2016, 02:41 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,547,981 times
Reputation: 4045
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
I have to agree with living it out being the best way to learn.
This is slightly different, but something my history teacher did one day really got to me (must have - I remember 28 years later).
We were in the 7th grade honors history. Sitting at our desks. Normal class. One kid had a hat on.

The teacher told him to take his hat off.
The kid said no.
This was a particularly historically obnoxious kid. Smart but mouthy.
The teacher raised his voice a little and told him to take it off again.
Again the kid said no. And gave him a little lip about how he had a right, blah blah.

The teacher jumped up suddenly, rushed to the kid's desk, upturned it so he fell out of it, and yanked the hat off his head, all the while bellowing and thundering. We were all floored. And scared. The upside down desk, the cowering boy on the floor, the red-faced man clutching a hat...

The teacher blinked for a second, shook his head, and stammered,

"Hey, guys. This was bad. This was real bad. I'm sorry. I'm so sorry. I'm going to take {kid's name} to the office. Um, I need you guys to go ahead and write down what happened. What you saw. So we can tell Principal So-and-so."

And they left, both visibly shaken.


Well, of course the whole thing was a ruse.

Afterwards, my teacher read all the different descriptions we had written of what had happened. It was AMAZING to see the differences in perspective and just details of what went on in the descriptions.

Taught me that anything that happens has many sides and is described differently by different people and you may not get the whole story or even the right story from any one person or even an entire group! History, as we learn it, is very changed from when it happened. There are facts and impressions but everything is filtered through the witnesses.

I think these reenactments can only serve to help kids better understand what went on. Hearing someone else describe something is nowhere near being there yourself. Or even pretending to be there.
That's an amazing example! I was thinking of the presidential debates my teachers set up when I was in middle school...it was completely memorable and everyone was really engaged - and we learned about government without even realizing it.

But even though I applaud this teacher for attempting to make a lesson come alive, there have been enough teachers getting in trouble recently for going out of bounds when teaching about race or slavery to make me think twice about doing anything too over the top. I would at least run it by an administrator if I didn't feel 100% comfortable with it - that way I would have I approved in advance and someone else would take the heat if it blew up.
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Old 09-03-2016, 06:47 PM
 
2,813 posts, read 1,400,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Sounds like there were four black students (out of 23), and also some hispanic students.
Yes, also it sounds like the administration, other teachers, and even parents have rallied around Ms Largent and very vocally supported her.
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