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Old 09-17-2016, 11:07 PM
 
7,293 posts, read 6,672,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
I'll admit that it doesn't really make sense why certain areas are least diverse than others. Why is North Fulton diverse but not South Fulton. What so different about West Atlanta that makes it exclusively black? What exactly attracts Hispanics and Asians to Clayton, Henry and North Fayette? It doesn't seem to be an income thing, so why can't all sides of the metro be equally diverse?
It's not necessarily as complicated as it may seem as to why some areas are more diverse than others.

That's because immigrants are often attracted to an area by many of the same factors and amenities that non-immigrants are attracted to an area by.

In the case of Fulton County, North Fulton County is more diverse than South Fulton because immigrants and transplants are attracted to the area by the extremely high quality and reputation of the schools in North Fulton and the extremely high concentration of jobs and retail amenities along the Georgia 400 and Georgia 141 corridors.

An area like West Atlanta likely does not attract the amount of diversity that other parts of Metro Atlanta attracts because of the relative lack of amenities that other areas might have.

Hispanics and Asians are likely attracted to Southside areas like Clayton, Henry and North Fayette because of the lower housing costs relative to the much more heavily-populated Northside.

Though generally it will often be an extremely high concentration of jobs in an area of good schools near a high concentration of retail and recreational amenities that will often attract the most newcomers (immigrants and transplants) of different races and ethnicities.
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Old 09-17-2016, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,708 posts, read 18,541,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
It's not necessarily as complicated as it may seem as to why some areas are more diverse than others.

That's because immigrants are often attracted to an area by many of the same factors and amenities that non-immigrants are attracted to an area by.

In the case of Fulton County, North Fulton County is more diverse than South Fulton because immigrants and transplants are attracted to the area by the extremely high quality and reputation of the schools in North Fulton and the extremely high concentration of jobs and retail amenities along the Georgia 400 and Georgia 141 corridors.

An area like West Atlanta likely does not attract the amount of diversity that other parts of Metro Atlanta attracts because of the relative lack of amenities that other areas might have.

Hispanics and Asians are likely attracted to Southside areas like Clayton, Henry and North Fayette because of the lower housing costs relative to the much more heavily-populated Northside.

Though generally it will often be an extremely high concentration of jobs in an area of good schools near a high concentration of retail and recreational amenities that will often attract the most newcomers (immigrants and transplants) of different races and ethnicities.
Have you ever priced real estate in Fayette? The median listing price as of July 2016 was $320,000.

Regardless of race, families move to Fayette County all for the same reason -- for the great schools -- and because they have the financial means to do so.
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Old 09-17-2016, 11:32 PM
 
727 posts, read 584,469 times
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The demographic transformation of Atlanta has been dramatic since 1990. If I remember correctly, Atlanta had a net growth of 1M people between 2000-2010. Of that growth 80% was from minorities. The largest segment of growth was from African Americans which was about 55% of the total. The next highest net gain was from Hispanics. Whites made up less than 20% of the net growth. In fact, the African American population in the metro area has grown by over 1M since 1990. This was due to many middle class African Americans remigrating to Atlanta from Northern Cities for jobs and affordable housing, and is why Atlanta was nicknamed the "Black Mecca". At the same time, the explosive growth in poultry and construction attracted many immigrants from Mexico and Central America. People tend to settle in areas close to family or close to job centers. Many African Americans initially started settling in Atlanta, South Dekalb, South Fulton, and Clayton County, and began displacing many white families in those areas. Many Hispanics settled along the Buford Highway corridor close to the construction boom in North Metro Atlanta. Clayton and South Fulton also began attracting many more African Americans, Southeast Asians, and eventually Hispanics too (second wave of white flight. The first wave was in the 60's and 70's when Atlanta desegregated schools and working class whites headed south to South Fulton and Clayton County, and middle class whites moved to Dekalb and eventually Gwinnett).

At the same time many middle class African Americans began moving from traditionally African American areas to working class/rural white areas like Rockdale, Douglas, and Henry Counties in the late 90's/2000's, and there was another wave of white flight.

It's amazing Gwinnett has remained so balanced with the exception of the South Gwinnett/Shiloh areas as well as the I-85 corridor schools like Berkmar, Meadowcreek, and Central Gwinnett. Also, there has been some white flight in Gwinnett to Buford, Suwanee, and Dacula/ Hamilton Mill areas. There is also a larger hispanic population in and around Norcross, and a large Asian population in and around Duluth, which is closer to high tech job centers. However, with the exponential growth in minorities across Atlanta, many resegregation patterns have slowed in Gwinnett, and it's become a great melting pot.

The vast diversity in Atlanta has also desensitized many upper middle class whites to the prospect of living around other people besides "boring" white people. Many traditionally lily white suburbs in Atlanta such as East Cobb, North Fulton, Forsyth, Cherokee, and Fayette are much more diverse than they were 20 years ago, and they are still attracting middle and upper middle class white families. That's a good sign that white flight may eventually be a thing of the past, and people are segregating more by economic class, and not by race.
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Old 09-17-2016, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,056 posts, read 8,484,198 times
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Ok, Most importantly.... The Dawgs won!

I prepped a little chart from the US News source earlier from Demonta.

Only this time I'm spinning it back to Gwinnett. ... I have some serious points to doing this, but admittedly it is also a shameless plug to help fend off some mis-information from earlier as well.

But nonetheless, it is true to thread's subject.



This chart is Gwinnett's High schools by race. I did not rank these specifically, however I did quickly place the more diverse schools to the top and the least diverse schools to the bottom. I also included the rankings and school population moreso to reuse this later for other purposes, but I do have one interesting comment on this...


Key takeways


- It is pretty hard to question the level of diversity in large parts of Gwinnett. I really just wanted people to see this, because I don't think some people always understood quite the level of diversity that currently exists in large parts of Gwinnett.

-Nonetheless, things are not perfectly uniform. There is some clustering, but even amongst the clustering there is diversity. Many groups seem to cluster within about a 20 minute driver around a single node. Hispanics seem to be within 20 minutes of Steve Reynolds and Indian Trail between Norcross and Lilburn (Meadowcreek/Berkmar/Norcross). They are actually more heavily present south of I-85 running along Meadowcreek, Berkmar, even stretching up to Collins Hill and Central Gwinnett a bit. Many people associated Buford highway with hispanics more, so it might be a surprise to some. Asians seem to center around Duluth a bit more. Koreans more to the north and west (Duluth/Peacthree Ridge/Parkview/Brookwood/North Gwinnett). Indians a bit more to the southwest towards Lilburn. Chinese a bit more spread out. Granted, I'm using outside data that I know form the past to explain some of this. Blacks are heavily in the southern tip of the county (Shiloh/South Gwinnett)

-Out of 19 schools 5 of them have a majority race, 14 do not.

-Out of those 5: 2 are majority black, 2 are majority white, 1 is majority Hispanic.

-None are overwhelmingly one race. I do see a couple areas trending that way.

-The first 3 or 4 schools on the list are true stand outs.

-One last detail I found interesting... and I found this by mistake. Even though Gwinnett's top ranked school (by US News) is near the bottom of the list, all of the most diverse schools are ranked in the top 50 in the state. Gwinnett's schools that are not ranked tend to be at the bottom half of the list. I don't think this is enough to draw any conclusions. I just found it interesting.


Lastly, because I know most people aren't experts on school location within Gwinnett. This will help anyone put in context any location patterns based on the above data:



*My apologies... I was too lazy to look up Buford city. I searched for schools in the GCPS district. Discovery is too new for data, however I suspect it is similar to Central Gwinnett. I also think US News' student data is just old enough many of the kids placed into Discover is totaled up with Central Gwinnett. Nonetheless, boundary shifts might cause differences between those two schools in particular.
Attached Thumbnails
How and why did Gwinnett County change?-gwinnett_hs_race.jpg   How and why did Gwinnett County change?-gwinnett_hs_boundaries_2016.jpg  
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Old 09-18-2016, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Georgia
3,783 posts, read 3,485,638 times
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I remember seeing statistics (forget where) that say students in more diverse schools perform better. This could be part of why Gwinnett Schools are ahead of other counties, especially in low income areas. That combined with Gwinnettvs awesome school board.
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Old 09-18-2016, 01:42 AM
 
15,026 posts, read 24,081,478 times
Reputation: 5721
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Ok, Most importantly.... The Dawgs won!

I prepped a little chart from the US News source earlier from Demonta.

Only this time I'm spinning it back to Gwinnett. ... I have some serious points to doing this, but admittedly it is also a shameless plug to help fend off some mis-information from earlier as well.

But nonetheless, it is true to thread's subject.



This chart is Gwinnett's High schools by race. I did not rank these specifically, however I did quickly place the more diverse schools to the top and the least diverse schools to the bottom. I also included the rankings and school population moreso to reuse this later for other purposes, but I do have one interesting comment on this...


Key takeways


- It is pretty hard to question the level of diversity in large parts of Gwinnett. I really just wanted people to see this, because I don't think some people always understood quite the level of diversity that currently exists in large parts of Gwinnett.

-Nonetheless, things are not perfectly uniform. There is some clustering, but even amongst the clustering there is diversity. Many groups seem to cluster within about a 20 minute driver around a single node. Hispanics seem to be within 20 minutes of Steve Reynolds and Indian Trail between Norcross and Lilburn (Meadowcreek/Berkmar/Norcross). They are actually more heavily present south of I-85 running along Meadowcreek, Berkmar, even stretching up to Collins Hill and Central Gwinnett a bit. Many people associated Buford highway with hispanics more, so it might be a surprise to some. Asians seem to center around Duluth a bit more. Koreans more to the north and west (Duluth/Peacthree Ridge/Parkview/Brookwood/North Gwinnett). Indians a bit more to the southwest towards Lilburn. Chinese a bit more spread out. Granted, I'm using outside data that I know form the past to explain some of this. Blacks are heavily in the southern tip of the county (Shiloh/South Gwinnett)

-Out of 19 schools 5 of them have a majority race, 14 do not.

-Out of those 5: 2 are majority black, 2 are majority white, 1 is majority Hispanic.

-None are overwhelmingly one race. I do see a couple areas trending that way.

-The first 3 or 4 schools on the list are true stand outs.

-One last detail I found interesting... and I found this by mistake. Even though Gwinnett's top ranked school (by US News) is near the bottom of the list, all of the most diverse schools are ranked in the top 50 in the state. Gwinnett's schools that are not ranked tend to be at the bottom half of the list. I don't think this is enough to draw any conclusions. I just found it interesting.


Lastly, because I know most people aren't experts on school location within Gwinnett. This will help anyone put in context any location patterns based on the above data:



*My apologies... I was too lazy to look up Buford city. I searched for schools in the GCPS district. Discovery is too new for data, however I suspect it is similar to Central Gwinnett. I also think US News' student data is just old enough many of the kids placed into Discover is totaled up with Central Gwinnett. Nonetheless, boundary shifts might cause differences between those two schools in particular.


Great post, cw.

Now, could you do a similar post for Cobb County?
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Old 09-18-2016, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,056 posts, read 8,484,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Great post, cw.

Now, could you do a similar post for Cobb County?
I might could put something together.

I have some clues of what happens on the ground in Cobb from demographic mapping, but I personally don't know what happens on the ground near as well as I do for Gwinnett.

Do you have a good school zone map for Cobb to share?
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Old 09-18-2016, 02:43 AM
 
15,026 posts, read 24,081,478 times
Reputation: 5721
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
I might could put something together.

I have some clues of what happens on the ground in Cobb from demographic mapping, but I personally don't know what happens on the ground near as well as I do for Gwinnett.

Do you have a good school zone map for Cobb to share?
Yes, I do.


And I could maybe help with some of the on the ground Cobb clues.


The map:

http://www.cobbk12.org/centraloffice...ce%20Zones.pdf

District Attendance Zone and Other Maps


Work your magic...!

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Old 09-18-2016, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,056 posts, read 8,484,198 times
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Default Cobb County Schools by Race



Ask you shall receive, Aries.

I will leave it to you to provide a more specific narration. I know you know Cobb firsthand far better than myself.

My few thoughts:

-Cobb has more high schools than I realized, but their avg size is smaller than I expected. I know Gwinnett has larger schools, but I still expected most to be above 2000. North Cobb, Campbell, McEachern and Walton are on par with what I was expecting.

- Cobb is possibly a bit more bi-polar than even I realized. East Cobb, of course, is a huge stand out of good schools. There is no secret there. They are ranked exceedingly well and are very white.

-I'm surprised at how many schools in Cobb aren't ranked in the top 58 by US News. It feels weird for me to say. It's unfathomable to me.

-Cobb has the same growth in black areas from the south, but it seems to extend further north into the county and slightly more diluted/more diverse than South Gwinnett.

-Overall Cobb felt like a more gray version the past of the dual continuum we have between a black majority or a white majority school, but it did feel like the classic continuum between whiter area-blacker area.

-Although, the next time I'm in Cobb I'm getting my Mexican food near Osborne.

-The most diverse school districts seemed to border I-75, with diversity decreasing just one district away from I-75

-When in doubt: Whiter to the east; blacker to the south west; Schools in the middle... closer to the middle

-There are not as many Asians, but they are on the in-town side of East Cobb close to Cumberland

-Ok, now I expect a more serious well, rounded review

And a reference map....

Attached Thumbnails
How and why did Gwinnett County change?-cobb_hs_race.jpg   How and why did Gwinnett County change?-cobb_hs_map.jpg  
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Old 09-18-2016, 03:23 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,056 posts, read 8,484,198 times
Reputation: 5198
Why Not Keep going.

Here is Fayette County. I'll be honest this is what I expected, but I have a tidbit to bring up in a moment




-First and foremost; Make better maps, seriously... Call Gwinnett and Cobb up and be like... can I contract your Cartographer for a week?

Ok, seriously... smaller system, but more simply and straight forward.

-Peachtree City and areas south of the county are whiter and ranked.

-Areas further north and the northeast towards Clayton are become much more black, but the area is very diverse along a black-white continuum.

-The segregation is much more blurred than it use to be. Things are more grey.

-Not many Asians, but a few Hispanics

-The big thing that stuck out to me is notice the other/2+ column is much higher than Gwinnett and Cobb. The reason is mostly the 2 or more races/biracial. It made me think of what someone said earlier. It would be there are more biracial families moving to parts of Fayette. I'm also curious if for some reason there is a systematic reporting difference caused by the schools districts. Not saying it isn't true, but there might be a difference in how they ask student to self-report race that causes them to answer differently (ie. well my grandma is black, so I'm mixed. Somewhere else someone might be encouraged to say... I really look more white (or black) and that is my identity, so I'm just that)

-They schools are considerably smaller!

-Sorry I forgot state rankings:
McIntosh: 26
Starrs Mill: 31
Whitewater: 36
Remainder: NR






Attached Thumbnails
How and why did Gwinnett County change?-fayette_hs_map.jpg   How and why did Gwinnett County change?-fayette_hs_race.jpg  
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