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Old 09-18-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,990 posts, read 1,734,304 times
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Per CWKimbo's chart: Backs up what I have been saying about the incredible diversity of Northeast Clayton County. Looking at the retail along Jonesboro Road going from Forest Park, Lake City, and Morrow, it really is Buford Highway, South. The City of Morrow has such a large Asian population (mostly Southeast Asian, Vietnamese, etc.) that they have a an Asian Council Lady, undoubtedly a first for the county. What is not told in these numbers is the large population of OWP's (older White people) that also live in Forest Park, Lake City, and Morrow that really do ease up the diversity of these communities. Of course, they have lived here for years and have stayed put, unlike most of their counterparts further West (Riverdale and other communities west of 19-41.) The lower number of White students in South County is also not a big surprise. Much of the Panhandle area is semi-rural (few students or people of any type) and most subdivisions in South Clayton are of a much more recent vintage (1990's to mid 2000's as opposed 10 the 1950's to 1960's like Forest Park/ Lake City/ Morrow). This is important because when many homes in South Clayton were built, many Whites had begun the "write-off" Clayton County as a place to live. Many may also be surprised at the low number of White students at Jonesboro High with the affluent Lake Spivey area being a part of the school district. This also does not surprise me. Living in the Spivey area, which definitely trends "whiter" than the county as a whole and does have million dollar mansions on the lake front, I know that many of the area's homeowners are older and do not have school aged kids. I also know that of the teen age kids on my street (one Black, One Asian, and two Whites) only one of them goes to Jonesboro High (the Asian one) where as the others go to Woodward Academy and Eagles Landing Christian. This may be the product of the accreditation crisis from several years ago or simply because they just can afford it. What I do know is I am often stuck behind a Woodward Academy bus on Lake Jodeco Road when I am running late for work! LOL
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Old 09-18-2016, 12:54 PM
 
30,560 posts, read 29,011,780 times
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Here's a look at the demographics of Gwinnett high schools over the last several years.

It looks to me like the Asian share has been fairly steady, with most of the growth coming from blacks and Hispanics.


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Old 09-18-2016, 03:26 PM
 
7,310 posts, read 6,681,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Here's a look at the demographics of Gwinnett high schools over the last several years.

It looks to me like the Asian share has been fairly steady, with most of the growth coming from blacks and Hispanics.

That's a great posting, arjay.

Some things that standout from the demographics that you posted are that...

> There are only two majority-white high schools remaining in the GCPS (Gwinnett County Public Schools) system, North Gwinnett High School (56% white) and Mill Creek High School (57% white)....This is something that is notable in a county where the population was nearly 90% white back in 1990 and was 96% white back in 1980...

> There are seven more high schools in the GCPS system where white students make up a plurality of the student body, Peachtree Ridge (27% white (tied with the black student population)), Collins Hill (31% white), Parkview (32% white), Brookwood (41% white), Archer (42% white), Mountain View (45% white) and Lanier (45% white)...

> There are five high schools in the GCPS system where the percentage of the white student population is only in the single digits, South Gwinnett (8% white), Shiloh (6% white), Discovery (6% white), Berkmar (4% white), Meadowcreek (3% white)...

> There are two high schools in the GCPS system where black students make up a majority of the student body, South Gwinnett (74% black) and Shiloh (76% black)...

> There are five more high schools in the GCPS system where black students make up a plurality of the student body (where black students are the largest group but not the majority), Peachtree Ridge (27% black (tied with the white student population)), Duluth (30% black), Dacula (39% black), Grayson (43% black) and Central Gwinnett (48% black)...

> There are three high schools in the GCPS system where Hispanic students are the majority of the student body, Phoenix (55% Hispanic), Berkmar (58% Hispanic) and Meadowcreek (65% Hispanic)...

> There are two more high schools in the GCPS system where Hispanic students make up a plurality of the student body, Discovery (42% Hispanic) and Norcross (43% Hispanic)...

> The decline in the percentage of white students at Brookwood High School from majority status in 2009 (56% white in 2009) to plurality status in 2016 (41% white in 2016) is largely due to the growth of the black student population (which increased by 10 percentage points (from 16% to 26%) between 2009 and 2016) and not necessarily the growth of the Asian student population alone (which only increased by three percentage points from 13% to 16% between 2009 and 2016) as arjay alluded to earlier.
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Old 09-18-2016, 03:41 PM
 
1,048 posts, read 673,401 times
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Great stuff here guys, much to Think about.
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Old 09-18-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
4,560 posts, read 6,527,340 times
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The Shiloh and South Gwinnett clusters have been struggles for GCPS because a large majority of the students are from Dekalb and a lot of the students have major deficiencies.

I was going through some of the CCRPI data for Gwinnett and I was shocked at the some of the scores. Out of the 79 elementary, a lot of schools are in the 60's and 70's.

They just have enough high achieving schools overall to improve their scores vs other districts.
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Old 09-18-2016, 06:52 PM
 
30,560 posts, read 29,011,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
That's a great posting, arjay.

Some things that standout from the demographics that you posted are that...

> There are only two majority-white high schools remaining in the GCPS (Gwinnett County Public Schools) system, North Gwinnett High School (56% white) and Mill Creek High School (57% white)....This is something that is notable in a county where the population was nearly 90% white back in 1990 and was 96% white back in 1980...
Born 2 Roll,

Do you see any evidence of "tipping point" changes in these data?

I have heard it said that percentages tend to be pretty stable until they fall to around 40%, at which point they may decline more precipitously.
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Old 09-18-2016, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,059 posts, read 8,488,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PKCorey View Post
The Shiloh and South Gwinnett clusters have been struggles for GCPS because a large majority of the students are from Dekalb and a lot of the students have major deficiencies.

I was going through some of the CCRPI data for Gwinnett and I was shocked at the some of the scores. Out of the 79 elementary, a lot of schools are in the 60's and 70's.

They just have enough high achieving schools overall to improve their scores vs other districts.
Eh....

It almost makes it sound like you're trying to argue the scores are over-inflated because so many of the schools are just -that- good, while only dwelling on the bad.


But yes... Gwinnett has a ton of elementary schools. The county is not homogeneous and they have 178 thousand students and many of them are very different. They do have some weaker areas and yes some of those areas are in the southern end. Many of the schools struggling the most are in the Hispanic-majority area.

But GCPS is definitely ahead of the state average. Also, a score in the 70s isn't really bad, that is more average, in fact schools between 75 and 80 are technically slightly beating average. The 60s are starting to be a little more concerning. Gwinnett scored about 80.5 overall, so of course there are going to be a number of schools in the 70s. Cobb had a 79.7. Fulton has a 74.7. Dekalb has a 67.7. Atlanta City was 66.8%. Cherokee County was a 79.7%.

Now places like Forsyth get an amazing 91.8 and I'm sure if we only included north Fulton-only their average would be higher than the Fulton County avg. And that is a certainly great achievement for them.

But a large core county that has such a diversified student and housing base will never be able to have an economically homogeneous of a population as a the smaller outer suburbs.

More importantly the schools usually, not always, stay ahead of the curve given the socio-economic background they have. This is important.

Now I know this data is a couple years old. Some have slipped and some have gotten better, but this is a key reason Gwinnett won he Broad Prize twice: Grading Atlanta - Bending the Curve: Why CCRPI Misleads Educators and Parents

So while we did have a small decrease in scores, which is always of concern, I'd say Gwinnett is still doing pretty strong. You just have to remember it is a very diverse population of 178k students and diversity goes beyond just race. Gwinnett is not homogenous in this regard.


Not to deflect, but I just wanted to point out Cherokee County and this came up in that link. They technically scored under Gwinnett, granted only slightly, but by every metric they should be doing better and capitalize on being more of a bedroom community in an affluent area.

Forsyth really takes theirs advantages and runs with it!
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Old 09-18-2016, 08:03 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
4,560 posts, read 6,527,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Eh....

It almost makes it sound like you're trying to argue the scores are over-inflated because so many of the schools are just -that- good, while only dwelling on the bad.


But yes... Gwinnett has a ton of elementary schools. The county is not homogeneous and they have 178 thousand students and many of them are very different. They do have some weaker areas and yes some of those areas are in the southern end. Many of the schools struggling the most are in the Hispanic-majority area.

But GCPS is definitely ahead of the state average. Also, a score in the 70s isn't really bad, that is more average, in fact schools between 75 and 80 are technically slightly beating average. The 60s are starting to be a little more concerning. Gwinnett scored about 80.5 overall, so of course there are going to be a number of schools in the 70s. Cobb had a 79.7. Fulton has a 74.7. Dekalb has a 67.7. Atlanta City was 66.8%. Cherokee County was a 79.7%.
No, I'm not.

I was stating that I didn't realize how much certain areas of the county/various clusters are impacted just like S. Dekalb, S. Fulton, North Fulton in Sandy Springs and other areas.

Most time, it made to seem like all GCPS is doing well overall but when you check out the CCRPI, a lot of the elementary schools are struggling just like their counterparts in the metro.

I've often wonder if the elementary schools in Gwinnett are too large at times.

60's and low 70's will get the principal checked out by central office in most districts in the metro, if the numbers are not improved in the coming year, they will be reassigned or demoted.
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Old 09-18-2016, 08:11 PM
 
727 posts, read 585,222 times
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Great insights Born 2 Roll!

This article is from a couple of years ago. It's a great analysis done by grad student Jarod Apperson on how Gwinnett continues to successfully educate low income kids.

Grading Atlanta - Bending the Curve: Why CCRPI Misleads Educators and Parents

"One district in the metro stands heads and tails above the rest, and that district is Gwinnett County. As shown in the graph below, virtually all schools in the county outperform what would be expected based on their FRL rates. Even at Corley Elementary School where 95% of students are low-income and almost all are Hispanic/Black achievement is stellar. Gwinnett County is “bending the curve,” a strong signal that something operationally is working right. We should be learning from the district and highlighting their success, but because the data distributed by the state fails to adequately account for expected performance, that message is lost in the headlines."

Last edited by PTC Dad; 09-18-2016 at 08:22 PM..
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Old 09-18-2016, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,708 posts, read 18,547,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PTC Dad View Post
Great insights Born 2 Roll!

This article is from a couple of years ago. It's a great analysis done by grad student Jarod Apperson on how Gwinnett continues to successfully educate low income kids.

Grading Atlanta - Bending the Curve: Why CCRPI Misleads Educators and Parents

"One district in the metro stands heads and tails above the rest, and that district is Gwinnett County. As shown in the graph below, virtually all schools in the county outperform what would be expected based on their FRL rates. Even at Corley Elementary School where 95% of students are low-income and almost all are Hispanic/Black achievement is stellar. Gwinnett County is “bending the curve,” a strong signal that something operationally is working right. We should be learning from the district and highlighting their success, but because the data distributed by the state fails to adequately account for expected performance, that message is lost in the headlines."
One of the biggest problems with public education for a long time has been dishonesty -- whether intentional or not -- with misinterpretation / manipulation of data, as well as an over-reaching attempt by all parties involved to be "PC" .. you know, for the sake of the children (which has some validity).

At any rate, there are two main issues that I've always had major problems with:

1. That the federal FRL methodology and process is completely flawed (a topic that's been discussed elsewhere in this forum)
2. That majority-minority is accepted as an excuse for lower performance, and vice versa

I understand first-hand how you have to tiptoe around these issues. Several years ago I wrote a newspaper article breaking down how the black students at a certain high school were outperforming their white peers on standardized tests. There was an enormous backlash and an attempt to get me fired -- because the parents of black students at that school thought the analysis was racist. The point of the article was to praise the school for raising ALL students to the same performance level. But they saw it as implying that somehow black students weren't expected to achieve at the same level of whites.

I learned my lesson.
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