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Old 06-22-2017, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
5,401 posts, read 2,727,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
Finally, it needs to be recognized that Metro Atlanta, with a young demographic, one of the largest air hubs in the world, and the absence of a corridor such as Boston-New York-Washington or Los Angeles-San Francisco (which stands a better-than-anticipated chance of success due to the higher speeds possible due to its brand-new, built-from-scratch right-of-way) can't be easily integrated into a national network. Anything designed for Atlanta will have to be designed around Atlanta and Atlanta alone; and that is a role better suited for MARTA.
I think you're forgetting about the Atlanta -> Charlotte -> DC corridor, or, to put it another way, the Piedmont Atlantic Megaregion (which also includes Birmingham, Nashville, and Memphis).

This megaregion is expected to grow to to 31.3 Million people by 2050. Yes Atlanta will be the core of that growth (when excluding DC), but that doesn't mean the outlying cities wouldn't see their own fair share of expansion and growth. In that, additional intercity rail service, especially if coordinated with the local metro areas' regional transit authorities, would be an incredible asset. Not just for connecting the primary cities of the megaregion, but for helping turn the in-between cities into bedroom communities for the swelling metros.

Of course Atlanta, Birmingham, Memphis, Charlotte, Nashville, Chattanooga, Raleigh, and any number of intermediate cities need better local transit, but the market is right for taking over shorter routes from airlines, to free up long-distance flights. In fact, the two projects should be done in coordination, sharing passenger-dedicated track in as many metro areas as possible for intercity and commuter rail lines alike.

As for Amtrak's role in that, I'm not sure, but a good start would be to expand the number of, and frequency of long-haul routes passing through Atlanta, which would also provide additional service to the metros through which they run.
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Old 06-22-2017, 07:43 AM
 
Location: City of Trees
1,061 posts, read 878,782 times
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I love train travel, and I'm totally on board for this, especially if it helps the MultiModal Passenger Terminal get built beside a revamped Philips Arena. This is the biggest thing that could help South Downtown, and it would be a great alternative to the rising cost of air travel. Photos linked below:

https://www.peachtreehoops.com/2017/...is-giving-them
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Old 06-22-2017, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna.
11,367 posts, read 6,786,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fourthwarden View Post
I think you're forgetting about the Atlanta -> Charlotte -> DC corridor, or, to put it another way, the Piedmont Atlantic Megaregion (which also includes Birmingham, Nashville, and Memphis).

This megaregion is expected to grow to to 31.3 Million people by 2050. Yes Atlanta will be the core of that growth (when excluding DC), but that doesn't mean the outlying cities wouldn't see their own fair share of expansion and growth. In that, additional intercity rail service, especially if coordinated with the local metro areas' regional transit authorities, would be an incredible asset. Not just for connecting the primary cities of the megaregion, but for helping turn the in-between cities into bedroom communities for the swelling metros.

If it's ever built, Washington-Charlotte-Atlanta would be a prime candidate for the fourth major HSR corridor -- after (1)Boston-Washington, (2)San Diego-Sacramento, and (3)a hub-and-spoke pattern centered around Chicago.


The first is a given; the Northeast is already saturated as far as new highway construction is concerned, and has the population density sufficient to support a large volume of ridership from intermediate stations; but the curves and structures (tunnels and drawbridges) which limit speeds date from over a century ago, and replacing them is going to be an expensive proposition.


The second is likely to be an "ace in the hole" for rail passenger advocates; That brand-new, flat-and straight, projected 200 MPH trackage is likely to allow speeds on a par with the much-ballyhooed French and Japanese systems, and patronage from the intermediate communities is likely to grow.


The third will be a slow process, because its backers are counting upon state support under an option referred to a Section 403(b) of the Act which originally funded Amtrak. So far, only Illinois and Michigan are on board.


Which leaves the proposed Piedmont corridor; Virginia runs commuter trans as far south as Manassas, and North Carolina funds a 403(b) plan which increases conventional service as far south as Charlotte (which. BTW, envisions suburban/commuter service at some point in the future.


But the point I want to emphasize is this: Rail passenger traffic, commuter as well as corridor, has witnessed a number of success stories in recent years, Los Angeles is well along on rebuilding a modern rail based network essentially along the same lines of what it had prior to the automotive boom, and Dallas/Fort Worth and South Florida are developing commuter/suburban systems; and that doesn't include the "light rail" (essentially a modernization of the trolley systems that dried up half a century ago. But all of them are driven by market forces; typically, population density and congestion rather than the price of fuel, which doesn't seem likely to leave us as vulnerable as was the case in the Seventies.

The system will likely be built over the long run, but the over-hyped benefits, like the story of a "conspiracy" to destroy the "successful" systems of the 1930's-40's (which a lot of people couldn't wait to escape by purchasing their own car), is mostly fodder for the Snowflakes of the "urban planning" crowd.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 06-22-2017 at 01:16 PM..
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Old 06-22-2017, 01:37 PM
 
28,113 posts, read 24,639,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
The second is likely to be an "ace in the hole" for rail passenger advocates; That brand-new, flat-and straight, projected 200 MPH trackage is likely to allow speeds on a par with the much-ballyhooed French and Japanese systems, and patronage from the intermediate communities is likely to grow.
That sounds interesting. Is this new track system available already or is it still being developed?

I'd like to read more about it if anyone has any links.
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Old 06-22-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
5,401 posts, read 2,727,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
That sounds interesting. Is this new track system available already or is it still being developed?

I'd like to read more about it if anyone has any links.
2nd Trick is talking about the HSR line under construction in California, using known and tried and tested technologies.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:00 PM
 
28,113 posts, read 24,639,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fourthwarden View Post
2nd Trick is talking about the HSR line under construction in California, using known and tried and tested technologies.
Is there a special kind of track (or method of manufacture or installation) being used?

I'd just like learn more about it.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Vinings
5,940 posts, read 2,904,691 times
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It would be so great to be able to pay a flat fare of let's say maybe, $100, and be able to head up to the northeast at 200 mph on a train. Arrive at DC in maybe 4 hours, or NY in 5 1/2.

Slower than flying there, but cheaper, maybe even half the price. And still fast enough that I could wake up early on a Saturday, and do a weekend trip in Manhattan, then Sunday evening catch the train back to Atlanta.

I can't stand flying, honestly. And all the hassle of it. But I would travel the heck out of a national bullet train system.

I'd also take it to New Orleans. Heck, depending on the fare, I'd do that trip multiple times a year, easy.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Decatur, GA
4,908 posts, read 3,705,971 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Is there a special kind of track (or method of manufacture or installation) being used?

I'd just like learn more about it.
No, standard steel rails on concrete crossties, just better maintained.
Quote:
Originally Posted by primaltech View Post
It would be so great to be able to pay a flat fare of let's say maybe, $100, and be able to head up to the northeast at 200 mph on a train. Arrive at DC in maybe 4 hours, or NY in 5 1/2.

Slower than flying there, but cheaper, maybe even half the price. And still fast enough that I could wake up early on a Saturday, and do a weekend trip in Manhattan, then Sunday evening catch the train back to Atlanta.

I can't stand flying, honestly. And all the hassle of it. But I would travel the heck out of a national bullet train system.

I'd also take it to New Orleans. Heck, depending on the fare, I'd do that trip multiple times a year, easy.
When you look at total trip time, with a top speed of 220mph, Washington is directly competitive between flights and trains. From a productivity time, rail beats air hands down.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,147,338 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by primaltech View Post
It would be so great to be able to pay a flat fare of let's say maybe, $100, and be able to head up to the northeast at 200 mph on a train. Arrive at DC in maybe 4 hours, or NY in 5 1/2.

Slower than flying there, but cheaper, maybe even half the price. And still fast enough that I could wake up early on a Saturday, and do a weekend trip in Manhattan, then Sunday evening catch the train back to Atlanta.

I can't stand flying, honestly. And all the hassle of it. But I would travel the heck out of a national bullet train system.

I'd also take it to New Orleans. Heck, depending on the fare, I'd do that trip multiple times a year, easy.
Why not just take Megabus to NOLA? Leave Atlanta at 11pm, sleep, and arrive in NOLA in the morning.
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Old 06-22-2017, 02:26 PM
 
28,113 posts, read 24,639,595 times
Reputation: 9523
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
No, standard steel rails on concrete crossties, just better maintained.
Thanks, Matt.
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