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Old 05-26-2017, 06:02 PM
 
9,910 posts, read 6,899,784 times
Reputation: 3017

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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
With thiis mom-existent zoning, could you see a concrete plant built right in the middle of a quiet neighborhood?
If you got rid of all zoning I supposed it would be possible. But it didn't really happen. The economics and logistics of putting it in the middle of a neighborhood rarely pan out. However, there were places like Cabbagetown where a mill would build worker housing right next to it on land they owned. I kinda wish companies still did that more today, sure would make for an easier commute.

Edit: And Ormewood Park still does have industrial zoning running right along the Beltline where a concrete plant still operates and a new one could be built without so much as a variance. So zoning does not prevent that.

Our current zoning does much more harm than good. The zoning rewrite needs to happen quick and needs bigger changes than not.
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Old 05-26-2017, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,115,275 times
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How much of the housing shortage crisis is due to the Private Equity Industry buying up a lot of existing house stock in the aftermath of the 2007-2009 subprime mortgage meltdown and simply sitting on them?

Or is talking about this particular industry off-limits?
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Old 05-26-2017, 07:19 PM
 
9,910 posts, read 6,899,784 times
Reputation: 3017
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcidSnake View Post
How much of the housing shortage crisis is due to the Private Equity Industry buying up a lot of existing house stock in the aftermath of the 2007-2009 subprime mortgage meltdown and simply sitting on them?

Or is talking about this particular industry off-limits?
Those investors are usually renting them out. So I don't think that is not a cause of the housing shortage. We need investors in order to build new housing. It is just harder and less attractive if not impossible to build in many places with our current zoning laws.
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Old 05-26-2017, 08:50 PM
 
4,244 posts, read 2,821,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
If you got rid of all zoning I supposed it would be possible. But it didn't really happen. The economics and logistics of putting it in the middle of a neighborhood rarely pan out. However, there were places like Cabbagetown where a mill would build worker housing right next to it on land they owned. I kinda wish companies still did that more today, sure would make for an easier commute.

Edit: And Ormewood Park still does have industrial zoning running right along the Beltline where a concrete plant still operates and a new one could be built without so much as a variance. So zoning does not prevent that.

Our current zoning does much more harm than good. The zoning rewrite needs to happen quick and needs bigger changes than not.
Well, I guess it depends how far you want to go with it. My back deck overlooks a large, older apartment complex below. If zoning were dropped and it became a free-for-all, that apartment complex could easily become a big box store or a ten-story building. and I'd be overlooking their loading docks. Been there, done that. No way.

Maybe you can make a case for zoning being changed in plenty of areas such as downtown and midtown, but I think you'd face a pretty hard battle with people who live in single family home neighborhoods wanting high-rises and office buildings built next door.
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Old 05-26-2017, 09:00 PM
 
9,910 posts, read 6,899,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Well, I guess it depends how far you want to go with it. My back deck overlooks a large, older apartment complex below. If zoning were dropped and it became a free-for-all, that apartment complex could easily become a big box store or a ten-story building. and I'd be overlooking their loading docks. Been there, done that. No way.

Maybe you can make a case for zoning being changed in plenty of areas such as downtown and midtown, but I think you'd face a pretty hard battle with people who live in single family home neighborhoods wanting high-rises and office buildings built next door.
I don't think it is quite the disaster you think. Lots of very high-end homes in midtown back up to high-rises.

And yeah, you are right, the discussion is nowhere near allowing high-rises to be built everywhere. That is what it would take if you really wanted to get housing supply a boost and bring rent costs down. But we are just to the point of fighting F-you-I-got-mine NIMBYs to allow duplexes to be built legally in neighborhoods that originally had them. Allowing high-rises or cement plans to be built everywhere is not on the table.
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Old 05-27-2017, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,159 posts, read 16,157,856 times
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We need to allow residents to build ADUs and enter into long term lease with individuals and not AirBnB.
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:42 AM
 
28,132 posts, read 24,652,789 times
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Here's a man who has lived on a quite cul-de-sac for 40 years and now they are trying to slap up 20 new homes next door to him.

New construction in old subdivisions is sign of Atlanta
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,115,275 times
Reputation: 2162
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
Those investors are usually renting them out. So I don't think that is not a cause of the housing shortage. We need investors in order to build new housing. It is just harder and less attractive if not impossible to build in many places with our current zoning laws.
I don't buy that explanation.
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
5,401 posts, read 2,730,106 times
Reputation: 2159
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcidSnake View Post
How much of the housing shortage crisis is due to the Private Equity Industry buying up a lot of existing house stock in the aftermath of the 2007-2009 subprime mortgage meltdown and simply sitting on them?

Or is talking about this particular industry off-limits?
They certainly don't help, though I don't have any numbers on them. Hasn't this been an issue on the west side? Why wouldn't we be able to talk about them?


Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Here's a man who has lived on a quite cul-de-sac for 40 years and now they are trying to slap up 20 new homes next door to him.

New construction in old subdivisions is sign of Atlanta
Good. We need the housing.
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Old 05-27-2017, 09:23 AM
bu2
 
8,973 posts, read 5,668,100 times
Reputation: 3540
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
If you got rid of all zoning I supposed it would be possible. But it didn't really happen. The economics and logistics of putting it in the middle of a neighborhood rarely pan out. However, there were places like Cabbagetown where a mill would build worker housing right next to it on land they owned. I kinda wish companies still did that more today, sure would make for an easier commute.

Edit: And Ormewood Park still does have industrial zoning running right along the Beltline where a concrete plant still operates and a new one could be built without so much as a variance. So zoning does not prevent that.

Our current zoning does much more harm than good. The zoning rewrite needs to happen quick and needs bigger changes than not.
Houston doesn't have zoning and you can't put a concrete plant in the middle of a neighborhood. They have restrictions on hazardous facilities. And there is a liability issue anyway. Where old residential is close to refineries, the refineries are gradually buying them out.

But you don't have to get rid of zoning to simplify and make it easier to create a city that works better. You could go to form based zoning or from 30 or 40 zones to a dozen or less. You can eliminate layers of approvals. You can cut back on SFH zones.

It may have been Atlanta, but I think it was DeKalb, had a 2 acre minimum lot SFH zone, a 1 acre and several other sizes down to about 50,000 SF. Why should we protect estate size lots in the city? Why not just a 50,000 SF zone with minimum widths (so they don't take a long 2 acre site and split it up oddly with some 20 ft. frontages (there are a few lots like that in Druid Hills).
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