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Old 07-30-2017, 03:09 PM
 
Location: In your feelings
2,199 posts, read 1,491,763 times
Reputation: 2168

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I probably go there 3 or 4 times a year and basically my only problem with it is that it's inside a big mall and far away from me in Buckhead.
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Old 07-30-2017, 03:26 PM
 
1,368 posts, read 1,572,392 times
Reputation: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikigod311 View Post
I had been wondering what they were building in that space as soon as you come in off the Beltline...

This seems silly, but I also wonder if it will be able to serve the vast number of employees that work here. I'm pretty sure Barking Hound Village (the folks running the valet) have a full size location across the street. Maybe employees can drop off their dog on their way up to the office? Seems like that would be a valuable service to offer.

However posh this may seem, its going to generate a lot of PR for PCM. I can totally see this being the lighthearted story of the day for local news stations to try to wash the nasty taste of murders and the reports off all things terrible at the end of the hour.
This is targeted at Beltline users. Now if people have their dog, they can still stop in for lunch or whatever.
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Old 07-30-2017, 09:42 PM
 
Location: atlanta
3,966 posts, read 4,562,154 times
Reputation: 3212
Quote:
Originally Posted by J2rescue View Post
This is targeted at Beltline users. Now if people have their dog, they can still stop in for lunch or whatever.
this is aimed at a specific upscale demographic that can afford to give their dog a brandy and a cigar. it's just another sign the neighborhood is gentrifying even further and becoming more and more out of reach for most people. there are dog-friendly restaurants and bars around the city, i think there is one in reynoldstown; i don't think people have an axe to grind against dogs, it's the fact there are suddenly all of these people moving in from G-d knows where who can somehow afford to treat their dogs better than most people who live intown can afford to treat themselves. where are these people coming from— and why do they feel entitled to transform the city we grew up in into some kind of inaccessible elitist paradise for themselves?
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Old 07-30-2017, 10:07 PM
 
Location: NW Atlanta
4,995 posts, read 3,483,416 times
Reputation: 2647
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
why do they feel entitled to transform the city we grew up in into some kind of inaccessible elitist paradise for themselves?
Beats having the city's population (and tax base) drop by 20% in two decades.
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:45 AM
 
698 posts, read 261,530 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
this is aimed at a specific upscale demographic that can afford to give their dog a brandy and a cigar. it's just another sign the neighborhood is gentrifying even further and becoming more and more out of reach for most people. there are dog-friendly restaurants and bars around the city, i think there is one in reynoldstown; i don't think people have an axe to grind against dogs, it's the fact there are suddenly all of these people moving in from G-d knows where who can somehow afford to treat their dogs better than most people who live intown can afford to treat themselves. where are these people coming from— and why do they feel entitled to transform the city we grew up in into some kind of inaccessible elitist paradise for themselves?

So Progress and change is not a good thing? You have to look at the history of the area to totally understand this and it is one that you obviously don't know. There is nothing wrong with what has transpired in this area. As far as where are the people coming from does it matter? This area was once thriving until it was essentially destroyed by crime and drugs. Where did that come from? Was that ok? Was it ok for people to transform an area into a blighted decaying corpse that nobody wanted to visit?
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Old 07-31-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
5,405 posts, read 2,733,966 times
Reputation: 2164
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
this is aimed at a specific upscale demographic that can afford to give their dog a brandy and a cigar. it's just another sign the neighborhood is gentrifying even further and becoming more and more out of reach for most people. there are dog-friendly restaurants and bars around the city, i think there is one in reynoldstown; i don't think people have an axe to grind against dogs, it's the fact there are suddenly all of these people moving in from G-d knows where who can somehow afford to treat their dogs better than most people who live intown can afford to treat themselves. where are these people coming from— and why do they feel entitled to transform the city we grew up in into some kind of inaccessible elitist paradise for themselves?

As someone who grew up in the city, I don't have any problem with it. Someone offering a high-end service doesn't mean you can't be in that area. It doesn't mean you can't use the BeltLine, or walk around PCM.


You and I might not be able to afford to eat there a ton, but that's nothing new for me. Besides, how many jobs came in? How much revenue was added to the tax base?


I'm by no means a supply-side kind of person, but you have to admit that what's there now is better than the dead hulk that was there before.


The answer to negating the negative aspects of gentrification is not to keep out new and even expensive development. That doesn't help anyone, least of all the poor as the wealthy will just pay the higher costs, or there will be no addition to the tax base.


The answer is to let wealthy people build things in 'hot' areas, and to do everything in our power to lower the barrier of entry for new development so that new construction can occur in other places, at far more affordable prices.
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Old 07-31-2017, 01:02 PM
 
Location: NW Atlanta
4,995 posts, read 3,483,416 times
Reputation: 2647
Quote:
Originally Posted by fourthwarden View Post
As someone who grew up in the city, I don't have any problem with it. Someone offering a high-end service doesn't mean you can't be in that area. It doesn't mean you can't use the BeltLine, or walk around PCM.


You and I might not be able to afford to eat there a ton, but that's nothing new for me. Besides, how many jobs came in? How much revenue was added to the tax base?


I'm by no means a supply-side kind of person, but you have to admit that what's there now is better than the dead hulk that was there before.


The answer to negating the negative aspects of gentrification is not to keep out new and even expensive development. That doesn't help anyone, least of all the poor as the wealthy will just pay the higher costs, or there will be no addition to the tax base.


The answer is to let wealthy people build things in 'hot' areas, and to do everything in our power to lower the barrier of entry for new development so that new construction can occur in other places, at far more affordable prices.
I'm calling it what it is: Jealousy brought on by wealth envy.
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Old 07-31-2017, 01:30 PM
 
1,268 posts, read 631,135 times
Reputation: 1694
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryantm3 View Post
this is aimed at a specific upscale demographic that can afford to give their dog a brandy and a cigar. it's just another sign the neighborhood is gentrifying even further and becoming more and more out of reach for most people. there are dog-friendly restaurants and bars around the city, i think there is one in reynoldstown; i don't think people have an axe to grind against dogs, it's the fact there are suddenly all of these people moving in from G-d knows where who can somehow afford to treat their dogs better than most people who live intown can afford to treat themselves. where are these people coming from— and why do they feel entitled to transform the city we grew up in into some kind of inaccessible elitist paradise for themselves?
No one's transforming anything. Businesses cater to the clientele that lives in an area. Atlanta is a popular place to move, so this is what happens. If you don't like it, there are plenty of areas of the city where crime is still rampant and there is little to no gentrification. No one person or group owns the city. If you're uncomfortable with safe, gentrified areas, don't hang out in them. Likewise, people who feel better in areas with $7 lattes and dog valets will hang out in those areas.
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