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Old 01-16-2018, 09:16 AM
 
7 posts, read 12,386 times
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I did a search and didn't see a thread on this. I thought this was interesting...

Quote:
The big brick David T. Howard Building stands forlorn and fenced off in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward.
There are a few holes in the windows and cracks on the sidewalk in front of the historic school, which closed in 1976.

But by late spring or early summer, the 7.5-acre site on John Wesley Dobbs Avenue NE will come alive when construction begins to renovate the old school and build a new addition.

In 2020, students will once again gather in the classrooms where Martin Luther King Jr. attended as a child from 1936 to 1940.

The $52 million rebirth of the vacant school is a centerpiece of roughly $125 million worth of Atlanta Public Schools building projects scheduled to begin in the coming months and paid for with a one-cent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax.
MLK's childhood school to reopen
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:30 AM
 
1,429 posts, read 783,952 times
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Originally Posted by bravos View Post
I did a search and didn't see a thread on this. I thought this was interesting...



MLK's childhood school to reopen
Very cool! Does anyone have a list of what the other money will be spent on and the schedule?
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,381 posts, read 17,551,588 times
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Waste of $52M when Grady overcrowding could have been solved by redistricting to Jackson Cluster which has the capacity to alleviate Grady's issues. APS needs to use the existing resources before spending more than half the ESPLOST funds on 1 school.
APS is responsible for allowing the site to fall into such disrepair. They are horrible landlords to the numerous vacant sites that plaque neighborhoods in Atlanta. They allow their properties to rot away, instead of selling.
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:15 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 1,831,310 times
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Waste of $52M when Grady overcrowding could have been solved by redistricting to Jackson Cluster which has the capacity to alleviate Grady's issues. APS needs to use the existing resources before spending more than half the ESPLOST funds on 1 school.
APS is responsible for allowing the site to fall into such disrepair. They are horrible landlords to the numerous vacant sites that plaque neighborhoods in Atlanta. They allow their properties to rot away, instead of selling.
I think it's great to bring the school back and hopefully use it's history to motivate young students, but I agree that it's too much money to spend on 1 school.

APS needs to be overhauled like MARTA. It wasn't that long ago that MARTA's finances were a mess and citizens had lost confidence, but they've turned it around.
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Old 01-16-2018, 12:10 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,058 posts, read 35,020,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Waste of $52M when Grady overcrowding could have been solved by redistricting to Jackson Cluster which has the capacity to alleviate Grady's issues. APS needs to use the existing resources before spending more than half the ESPLOST funds on 1 school.
APS is responsible for allowing the site to fall into such disrepair. They are horrible landlords to the numerous vacant sites that plaque neighborhoods in Atlanta. They allow their properties to rot away, instead of selling.
It could be that they're taking a longer term view and anticipating the Jackson cluster soon reaching capacity as well.
It seems some of these derelict buildings are beginning to come in handy as purchasing property for new school plant becomes a more and more expensive proposition. Also, I won't assign direct responsibility to Carstarphen for the current condition of the Howard. That situation has been festering long before she arrived.
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,381 posts, read 17,551,588 times
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Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
It could be that they're taking a longer term view and anticipating the Jackson cluster soon reaching capacity as well.
It seems some of these derelict buildings are beginning to come in handy as purchasing property for new school plant becomes a more and more expensive proposition. Also, I won't assign direct responsibility to Carstarphen for the current condition of the Howard. That situation has been festering long before she arrived.
Do you know how many years I have been hearing 'there's a baby boom' and yet it never comes to fruition. Coan MS closed in 2014, East Lake ES was closed 2012, Whitefoord ES closed in 2017 and these schools are in booming Edgewood, Kirkwood, and East Lake. In all but a couple clusters APS is closing schools, why shouldn't APS use that easily convertible capacity in buildings that are younger and require far less renovations, instead of spending 1/2 the ESPLOST funds on 1 campus?
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:53 PM
 
1,429 posts, read 783,952 times
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Do you know how many years I have been hearing 'there's a baby boom' and yet it never comes to fruition. Coan MS closed in 2014, East Lake ES was closed 2012, Whitefoord ES closed in 2017 and these schools are in booming Edgewood, Kirkwood, and East Lake. In all but a couple clusters APS is closing schools, why shouldn't APS use that easily convertible capacity in buildings that are younger and require far less renovations, instead of spending 1/2 the ESPLOST funds on 1 campus?
I fully agree.
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Old 01-16-2018, 02:56 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,058 posts, read 35,020,344 times
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Do you know how many years I have been hearing 'there's a baby boom' and yet it never comes to fruition. Coan MS closed in 2014, East Lake ES was closed 2012, Whitefoord ES closed in 2017 and these schools are in booming Edgewood, Kirkwood, and East Lake. In all but a couple clusters APS is closing schools, why shouldn't APS use that easily convertible capacity in buildings that are younger and require far less renovations, instead of spending 1/2 the ESPLOST funds on 1 campus?
I get that, but just because it hasn't happened doesn't mean it can't. I mean, how many couples buying in those neighborhoods are at present childless or have preschoolers? Ten years ago, unused DCCS properties such as the old Briarcliff HS, Kittredge Magnet and Skyland Elem were on the verge of liquidation; the recession put a halt to it. Now with NW DeKalb facing increased enrollment, particularly on the elementary school level, the Skyland property will become the new John Lewis Elementary, Cross Keys HS will be rehabbed and become a new middle school, the Briarcliff property will become the new Cross Keys HS and the old Kittredge property is serving as the current John Lewis elementary. DCCS would have been scrambling for property in one of the most pricey commercial RE markets in the metro had they not retained them. That was my point.
As to the Howard proposal, I agree that it may not be the most judicious use of funds, but (perhaps selfishly) I'm rather excited about the building's prospects as well as a solution for Inman Middle's overcrowding issue.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:22 PM
 
2,086 posts, read 1,804,937 times
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Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Do you know how many years I have been hearing 'there's a baby boom' and yet it never comes to fruition. Coan MS closed in 2014, East Lake ES was closed 2012, Whitefoord ES closed in 2017 and these schools are in booming Edgewood, Kirkwood, and East Lake. In all but a couple clusters APS is closing schools, why shouldn't APS use that easily convertible capacity in buildings that are younger and require far less renovations, instead of spending 1/2 the ESPLOST funds on 1 campus?
Playing Devil’s Advocate—-In the short and medium term you risk far less white participation in public schools in the upper grades (and it is already pretty low). Grady High is currently only 1/3 white. If all of the white families that were part of the system in elementary school, stayed through high school, it should probably be about twice that. A healthy chunk of white students are always on the fence about staying in the system. If you rezone a significant number may abandon the system completely, and not just the ones newly zoned for Jackson. There is a risk of more white famlies bailing on Grady as well. If the Lin kids (who I would guess have a higher participation rate at the upper levels than the other predominantly white schools) were rezoned to Jackson, would Morningside and SPARK families who were comfortable being a 33% minority at what is statistically a so-so school, still be comfortable as a 22% or less minority in a schools that is ranked even lower? I know folks that went to Lin that scooted to Paideia because there was a *chance* that they would be zoned out of Inman-Grady. You can say, ‘so what, let them bail, we don’t want them anyway’, but there is a real chance that this could result in more segregated schools, materially poorer schools, with a tax base that is less vested in the success or failure of the system. Not really an improvement for APS, beyond solving overcrowding.

End of being Devil’s Advocate—I think that some of what I described above would happen in the short and medium term, partially offset by increased white participation at Jackson from white kids zoned for Jackson, not currently considering Jackson, as it is currently zoned. My guess is that if you rezoned Lin to Jackson you would end up with two schools that are 15-20% white, and would eventually resemble Grady High’s current demographics in the long term.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:59 PM
 
1,429 posts, read 783,952 times
Reputation: 2082
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Originally Posted by jeoff View Post
Playing Devil’s Advocate—-In the short and medium term you risk far less white participation in public schools in the upper grades (and it is already pretty low). Grady High is currently only 1/3 white. If all of the white families that were part of the system in elementary school, stayed through high school, it should probably be about twice that. A healthy chunk of white students are always on the fence about staying in the system. If you rezone a significant number may abandon the system completely, and not just the ones newly zoned for Jackson. There is a risk of more white famlies bailing on Grady as well. If the Lin kids (who I would guess have a higher participation rate at the upper levels than the other predominantly white schools) were rezoned to Jackson, would Morningside and SPARK families who were comfortable being a 33% minority at what is statistically a so-so school, still be comfortable as a 22% or less minority in a schools that is ranked even lower? I know folks that went to Lin that scooted to Paideia because there was a *chance* that they would be zoned out of Inman-Grady. You can say, ‘so what, let them bail, we don’t want them anyway’, but there is a real chance that this could result in more segregated schools, materially poorer schools, with a tax base that is less vested in the success or failure of the system. Not really an improvement for APS, beyond solving overcrowding.

End of being Devil’s Advocate—I think that some of what I described above would happen in the short and medium term, partially offset by increased white participation at Jackson from white kids zoned for Jackson, not currently considering Jackson, as it is currently zoned. My guess is that if you rezoned Lin to Jackson you would end up with two schools that are 15-20% white, and would eventually resemble Grady High’s current demographics in the long term.
Isn't Jackson actually only like 5% white?
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