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Old 03-06-2018, 09:16 PM
 
28,430 posts, read 25,130,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
Yes, Dekalb's (and really Clayton County's and close-in South Fulton's) problems center around scores of aging and declining multi family apartment complexes. If you look around any of these areas at the single family neighborhoods, particularly the older ones, you will find mostly well kept vintage homes from the 1950's-1960's eras on largish tree-shaded lots. Perhaps this is why people in Metro Atlanta are not as "density friendly" as some posters on this board would like. Apartment complexes (unless they are in a super affluent and sought after communities like Buckhead or Midtown) ALWAYS decline and often take the commercial strips that are often built on major thoroughfares around down with them often stigmatizing nearby MUCH more stable single family communities. (I would point toward toward Memorial Drive corridor in Dekalb, Old Dixie/ 19/41 Corridor in Clayton County, or the Campbellton Road corridor in Southwest Atlanta/ East Point as examples. Even well regarded and sought after close in suburbs have this problem (Sandy Springs, Dunwoody, Brookhaven, and just east of Druid Hills) have more than their fair share of aging and declining apartment communities. I really don't have an answer to this quandary. I KNOW that people of modest means HAVE to have a place to live to.
A lot of apartments in the ATL have not fared well over time.

Let's hope this latest round of apartments bucks the trend.
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:33 PM
 
4,102 posts, read 3,797,216 times
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNEw...&index=12&t=0s


Watch this video and it will give you a very good explanation of what happened in S Dekalb County.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,028 posts, read 9,728,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
Yes, Dekalb's (and really Clayton County's and close-in South Fulton's) problems center around scores of aging and declining multi family apartment complexes. If you look around any of these areas at the single family neighborhoods, particularly the older ones, you will find mostly well kept vintage homes from the 1950's-1960's eras on largish tree-shaded lots. Perhaps this is why people in Metro Atlanta are not as "density friendly" as some posters on this board would like. Apartment complexes (unless they are in a super affluent and sought after communities like Buckhead or Midtown) ALWAYS decline and often take the commercial strips that are often built on major thoroughfares around down with them often stigmatizing nearby MUCH more stable single family communities. (I would point toward toward Memorial Drive corridor in Dekalb, Old Dixie/ 19/41 Corridor in Clayton County, or the Campbellton Road corridor in Southwest Atlanta/ East Point as examples. Even well regarded and sought after close in suburbs have this problem (Sandy Springs, Dunwoody, Brookhaven, and just east of Druid Hills) have more than their fair share of aging and declining apartment communities. I really don't have an answer to this quandary. I KNOW that people of modest means HAVE to have a place to live to.
Excellent synopsis. Recent threads on the Franklin Road Corridor in Marietta are another example and one city's solution to the problem.


On a totally different note, I hate to bring this up, but there is a perception from my very own demographic (white) that when an area reaches a certain level of minority representation in the local public schools, it is now considered "bad." I think the tolerance level has increased over the years. In the 60s and prior, anything less than 100% was bad. Then the 70s came and a certain small percentage was acceptable. Now the term seems to be "diverse" so it is ok if not one minority group makes it to majority status. But let any other group get the majority over white and it is now "bad."


I wish I weren't right about this.
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Old 03-07-2018, 03:35 PM
 
1,697 posts, read 1,716,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
Apartment complexes (unless they are in a super affluent and sought after communities like Buckhead or Midtown) ALWAYS decline and often take the commercial strips that are often built on major thoroughfares around down with them often stigmatizing nearby MUCH more stable single family communities.
Ugh, it happens in Buckhead and midtown too, it's just maybe they are more quickly torn down. Look at The Darlington and Pharr Court South in Buckhead for two of your slummy dangerous rundown apartments.
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,852 posts, read 1,304,872 times
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The Darlington? Really? When I worked at Rich's uptown at Lenox Square inthe early to mid 90's, I knew several or my co workers that lived there. No, nothing fancy, true even then, but nice enough efficiencies with, of course a prime and VERY CONVENIENT location. Then, that was well over twenty years ago.
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Old 03-07-2018, 08:28 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
21,642 posts, read 33,536,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
The Darlington? Really? When I worked at Rich's uptown at Lenox Square inthe early to mid 90's, I knew several or my co workers that lived there. No, nothing fancy, true even then, but nice enough efficiencies with, of course a prime and VERY CONVENIENT location. Then, that was well over twenty years ago.
A lot of sketchiness is associated with the Darlington these days, apparently.

https://www.google.com/search?q=darl...f9dd2c3e77bd,1,,,
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Old 03-07-2018, 09:46 PM
 
1,973 posts, read 1,682,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
A lot of sketchiness is associated with the Darlington these days, apparently.

https://www.google.com/search?q=darl...f9dd2c3e77bd,1,,,
Your search says that last year it was bought for 30 million, and the new owners plan on putting another 25 million into the place. So, expect for the place to improve...and for none of the current residents to be there for the enjoyment of those improvements.
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Old 03-08-2018, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,825 posts, read 3,151,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeoff View Post
Your search says that last year it was bought for 30 million, and the new owners plan on putting another 25 million into the place. So, expect for the place to improve...and for none of the current residents to be there for the enjoyment of those improvements.
Depending on the zoning in place, I wouldn't be surprised if they demolished it and redeveloped the site. That property is huge, and the location is the definition of prime.
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Old 03-08-2018, 12:21 PM
 
28,430 posts, read 25,130,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Depending on the zoning in place, I wouldn't be surprised if they demolished it and redeveloped the site. That property is huge, and the location is the definition of prime.
Right on the Beltline, too.
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Old 03-09-2018, 08:53 AM
 
482 posts, read 597,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlJan View Post
Ugh, it happens in Buckhead and midtown too, it's just maybe they are more quickly torn down. Look at The Darlington and Pharr Court South in Buckhead for two of your slummy dangerous rundown apartments.

Don't forget the older apartments at the eastern end of Peachtree Battle, too. Back in the 1990's they had become a low rent enclave. A former neighbor left that area because she felt her car was unsafe being parked on the street. However, because of the location of that area, almost all of the older apartments on Peachtree Battle have been either torn down and redeveloped into higher rent communities.


The whole area just east of there around Lindbergh MARTA Station (Musgrove Avenue) had experienced the same transformation into a large lower rent area which was showing its age. Again because of the desirable close in location, the older apartments have been torn down and replaced by the standard 6 story high rent apartments which you see being built all over Metro Atlanta and I suspect that we will soon see an oversupply of.


The big picture of apartments in the Metro Atlanta area is that while they my begin leasing to higher income professionals, over time the rents will lower and the income of the residents will be less and the appearance of the complex will reflect that. The test scores for the neighborhood schools is impacted, too. As a result there has been a reluctance by many of the suburbs to zone for apartments because of this sequence of events - Smyrna had a zoning moratorium for over 7 years because half of its population resided in multi-family housing and its schools test scores reflected that reality and it made it difficult for homeowners to sell their homes.


Because DeKalb County was the first major suburban area, it has a larger number of older apartments and thus, what has been discussed can be seen more clearly. The Buford Highway corridor is probably the largest example of this and the City of Brookhaven is now trying to address this with the older less maintained apartments within its borders.
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