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Old 04-01-2018, 11:42 PM
 
1,137 posts, read 473,385 times
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One very odd highway to me is GA-20, I generally wonder if they actually intended it to be the precursor to the outer perimeter during its conception, but it goes as far north as Rome GA, and as far south as McDonough and Atlanta Motor Speedway... in one HUGE horseshoe.
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Old 04-02-2018, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,109 posts, read 15,917,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
One very odd highway to me is GA-20, I generally wonder if they actually intended it to be the precursor to the outer perimeter during its conception, but it goes as far north as Rome GA, and as far south as McDonough and Atlanta Motor Speedway... in one HUGE horseshoe.
You’re half right. GA 20 predates any talk of the outer perimeter, but the outer perimeter as eventually proposed would have indeed roughly followed the current route of GA 20. In fact, Bruton Smith Parkway — the 4-lane extension of GA 20 linking AMS in Hampton to I-75 in McDonough — was built in anticipation of one day being the southern arc of the outer perimeter. Henry County even insisted that the intersection of GA 20 and US 19/41 be built to freeway standards, with flyover entrance and exit ramps. But this very short piece of freeway simply dead-ends intn a swamp at Lower Woolsey Road south of the racetrack.

Lots of movies and TV shows (including The Walking Dead) have filmed on this “orphaned” piece of freeway, which can easily be shut down for extended periods of time.
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Atlanta suburb without bad local traffic-2cc3130b-cf91-47a9-adf9-1d3b49e74e7e.png  
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:36 AM
 
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I don't know if there's a such thing as an entire suburb that has light traffic during rush hours. But many suburbs have specific areas that don't get nearly as congested as others.

For example, when I first moved to Atlanta, I lived in Smyrna. The only ways in and out of where I lived were Cobb Parkway and Windy Hill Road. I was a prisoner in my own home during commute hours. But that's just an awful location for traffic.

These days, I live in an area that probably has traffic pretty comparable to Smyrna/Marietta, I live in Duluth. However, the specific area that I live in does not have bad traffic in every direction all the time. So no matter what time of day it is, I can always get to a Publix, Kroger, Petsmart, Walgreens, etc. within about 5 minutes.

I think the key is finding a neigborhood that has at least two ways in and out on different streets, and better if at least one of them is not a main artery. It also helps if at least one way in and out has a traffic signal.

One nice thing about the suburbs is that the traffic tends to be quite predictable in terms of one direction being much busier than the other. You can generally plan your errands around that and avoid the trouble spots so long as you aren't trapped by main arteries. Look for an area with lots of neighborhood roads you can cut through, and if you are along a major thoroughfare, look for a part of it that doesn't have many stop lights. If you're in an area like Sandy Springs, you're just going to be totally screwed no matter what, but the areas that you mentioned should all be manageable with a little planning and selecting a home in a prime area that can easily avoid traffic.
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Old 04-02-2018, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
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I live in the Johns Creek area. Compared to the traffic in the little country town I grew up in as a child, the traffic here is awful. Compared to the traffic in Midtown Atlanta where I previously lived, the traffic here is very manageable. In my opinion, the worst traffic in metro Atlanta is in the Buckhead-Midtown-Downtown area. Makes the traffic in the burbs look pretty good for the most part.
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Old 04-02-2018, 04:58 AM
 
321 posts, read 155,911 times
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Originally Posted by AnsleyPark View Post
I live in the Johns Creek area. Compared to the traffic in the little country town I grew up in as a child, the traffic here is awful. Compared to the traffic in Midtown Atlanta where I previously lived, the traffic here is very manageable. In my opinion, the worst traffic in metro Atlanta is in the Buckhead-Midtown-Downtown area. Makes the traffic in the burbs look pretty good for the most part.
I tend to agree with that, even though 75 through Cobb County has gotten plain ridiculous these days. I am for one hoping the new HOT lanes bring some improvement. We will see.
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:46 AM
 
1,684 posts, read 1,668,961 times
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Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I don't know if there's a such thing as an entire suburb that has light traffic during rush hours. But many suburbs have specific areas that don't get nearly as congested as others.

For example, when I first moved to Atlanta, I lived in Smyrna. The only ways in and out of where I lived were Cobb Parkway and Windy Hill Road. I was a prisoner in my own home during commute hours. But that's just an awful location for traffic.

These days, I live in an area that probably has traffic pretty comparable to Smyrna/Marietta, I live in Duluth. However, the specific area that I live in does not have bad traffic in every direction all the time. So no matter what time of day it is, I can always get to a Publix, Kroger, Petsmart, Walgreens, etc. within about 5 minutes.

I think the key is finding a neigborhood that has at least two ways in and out on different streets, and better if at least one of them is not a main artery. It also helps if at least one way in and out has a traffic signal.

One nice thing about the suburbs is that the traffic tends to be quite predictable in terms of one direction being much busier than the other. You can generally plan your errands around that and avoid the trouble spots so long as you aren't trapped by main arteries. Look for an area with lots of neighborhood roads you can cut through, and if you are along a major thoroughfare, look for a part of it that doesn't have many stop lights. If you're in an area like Sandy Springs, you're just going to be totally screwed no matter what, but the areas that you mentioned should all be manageable with a little planning and selecting a home in a prime area that can easily avoid traffic.
This is great advice. It's all about your micro-neighborhood. I live in Buckhead but have 3 ways in and out of the neighborhood and a retail center less than a mile away w/ grocery, hardware, drugstore, 10 restaurants. If we want to go out eat at 6pm on Thursday--you can bet we go to one of those restaurants. I imagine this is similar whether you live in Kennesaw or Sandy Springs or whatever busy area.
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,558 posts, read 8,622,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC2ATL60 View Post
I tend to agree with that, even though 75 through Cobb County has gotten plain ridiculous these days. I am for one hoping the new HOT lanes bring some improvement. We will see.
Yep. You are so right!
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:27 AM
 
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Every suburb is basically the same. Depending on the community's relative location to DT Atlanta/Perimeter/Buckhead/Midtown or the nearest tech park, between (as most have already commented) 6:30a to 9a as well as 3:30p and 7p access to these areas are heavily congested. After and between these hours, the metro has grocery/shopping/restaurant options galore on almost every corner, at every intersection.

One positive note: When school lets out there is a notably better drive to work in the suburbs. So the summer is a small reprieve. The afternoon is not really better, however.

Also, 90,000 additional people move to the metro every year. That means that roughly 40,000 cars are added every year. That means that about 100 cars join the congestion every day. Lets say 1 or 2 cars per area (metro is made up of about 80 to 100 cities/towns/cdp/areas), give or take, are added to every commute every day. Some places more. Some less. So if you are concerned about traffic, its only going to get worse, as the sands of time progress.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:29 AM
 
5,367 posts, read 4,889,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robalob View Post
I really like the Atlanta suburbs since there are a lot of nice areas with good schools. However, I constantly see complaints about Atlanta's traffic whenever I research. Are there any suburbs without bad local traffic ( not commuting) because I'm able to work remotely. Sometimes I vet the impression that the traffic in Atlanta is so bad thatbtheres even traffic to the local market of your local suburb and that terrifies me. Which Atlanta suburbs do not have bad traffic within (Dacula, Peachtree City, Cummings, Buford, Duluth....?)?
It all depends on what kind of suburban environment that you might be looking for.

The areas that are likely to experience lesser amounts of local traffic congestion during peak traffic hours (morning and afternoon/evening rush hours, holiday and weekend traffic around shopping areas, holiday/vacation travel periods, etc) are likely to be far outer-suburban areas that are located further out from the core of the Atlanta metro area.

Of the 5 suburban towns that you mentioned, Dacula is most likely to experience relatively slightly less severe traffic congestion within during peak traffic hours... Though there will still be heavy traffic during peak hours, particularly along and close to the I-85 and GA 316 corridors.

Peachtree City, Cumming, Buford and Duluth all experience varying degrees of much heavier peak-hour traffic.

Like Newsboy noted, Peachtree City experiences heavy peak-hour traffic along Georgia state routes 74 and 54 (particularly at the GA 74/GA 54 intersection during peak hours).

The Cumming area experiences heavy peak-hour traffic along the corridors of Georgia state routes 400, 141, 20 and 9.

The Buford area experiences very heavy (and sometimes severe) peak-hour traffic along the corridors of I-85, I-985 and GA 20.

GA 20 traditionally has particularly tended to experience extremely heavy traffic through the Mall of Georgia-anchored shopping district (the stretch of GA 20 Buford Drive through the Buford area between Interstates 85 and 985) during the Christmas shopping season (from around Thanksgiving through Christmas Eve and even for a few days after Christmas when gifts are being returned at heavy volumes).

Other roads in the Buford area (like Peachtree Industrial Boulevard, GA 13 Buford Highway, etc) can be somewhat heavy but still passable during peak hours.

Duluth possibly may be considered the worst of the 5 suburban towns you named from a peak-hour traffic standpoint just simply because of the often severe traffic along Pleasant Hill Road through the Duluth area during peak traffic hours. I-85 can often be extremely challenged during peak traffic hours as well, particularly through the part of the Duluth area that is south of the I-85/GA 316 interchange.

You would probably have to consider further outlying outer-suburban towns like Dallas, Georgia in Paulding County, Covington in Newton County and Locust Grove in Henry County and go beyond outlying outer-suburban towns like Canton and Loganville as well as beyond aforementioned outer-suburban towns like Newnan, Peachtree City, Buford and Cumming to find an Atlanta suburb without substantially challenged local traffic.
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:55 PM
 
277 posts, read 89,523 times
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Tucker.

Traffic is only bad at the exits during rush.
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