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Old 04-09-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: City of Trees
1,061 posts, read 918,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Town Down View Post
Just because people don't live in the best neighborhoods, doesn't mean that they're renters. I'm realizing a lot of people assume this, but I've known too many people to disprove this true.
Bingo. They also assume that not living in the best neighborhood makes you a criminal. Some of these neighbors can barely pull themselves out of poverty before the gentrifiers move in and price them out, all while making the existing neighbors out to be the cause of crime and blight. If new residents could move in without patting themselves on the back as "pioneers," many of us wouldn't mind them joining our neighborhoods.

Come with RESPECT.
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
The way houses are being bought up and renovated, I don't think so. Even better question, what the hell happens to all the poor people who use to live in these neighborhoods and rent the crappy houses? Yuppies/millennials are buying houses and getting into ownership, that's good I guess, but where do all the older, less educated, poor people go?
I think it will be a lot longer than ten years before all of Atlanta is gentrified. Perhaps all the Beltline neighborhoods, and that is if nothing too crazy happens with the national economy.

Nevertheless, in 2028, I predict...

East Atlanta would be more like today's Candler Park,
Grant Park would be more like today's Inman Park,
West End would be like today's Grant Park,
Westview would be like today's East Atlanta

I think the Ashview Heights, Mozley Park, Grove Park, Washington Park areas will look a bit like today's Summerhill, Boulevard Heights, or Ormewood Park.

I think Pittsburgh, Vine City, English Ave. will be sort of like Peoplestown, or maybe Choosewood. If development really takes off, the bluff could be like today's Cabbagetown/Reynoldstown... maybe.

South Atlanta may start looking like today's Edgewood in about 10 years.

But for the neighborhoods in the Mays Cluster (inside 285) and much of the Douglass Cluster, I think it will continue to be predominantly African-American. But maybe more middle-class African-American than it already is.
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:31 PM
 
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I think it's tough to predict.

Remember, any type of recession or real estate bust could bring things to a grinding halt for 10 years or so.
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:42 PM
 
868 posts, read 352,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zanarkand A East View Post
Bingo. They also assume that not living in the best neighborhood makes you a criminal. Some of these neighbors can barely pull themselves out of poverty before the gentrifiers move in and price them out, all while making the existing neighbors out to be the cause of crime and blight. If new residents could move in without patting themselves on the back as "pioneers," many of us wouldn't mind them joining our neighborhoods.

Come with RESPECT.
What is the cause of all the blight and crime? Especially for neighborhoods that went from being middle class with good schools and safe to being crime ridden ****holes in a matter of not even 10 years? Were those people coming with respect? Or does that not matter in that instance?
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Old 04-09-2018, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,955 posts, read 1,440,538 times
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The Mays cluster today is still middle/ upper middle/ well to do. The difference is that the home owners have have held on and "aged in place" meaning that Mays High School/ Young Middle are NOT the "bougie" places they were in the 1990's; West Manor Elementary is still well regarded though. It is still a VERY nice affluent area.
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Old 04-10-2018, 12:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
What is the cause of all the blight and crime? Especially for neighborhoods that went from being middle class with good schools and safe to being crime ridden ****holes in a matter of not even 10 years? Were those people coming with respect? Or does that not matter in that instance?
TROLL ALERT! Weíve discussed this on here many times before. The short answer is everyone who could (even black people) ran to the suburbs when that was in vogue. Itís not an issue of who came, itís an issue of who was left to stay... and what they were left to after a population-depleting mass exodus, brain drain, economic abandonment, and major disinvestment in the inner city throughout the 80ís and early nineties.

Iím not necessarily ďanti-gentrificationĒ, but letís not blame the victims here who were literally forced to live in these areas when they were all but abandoned by most people with means. That is the biggest complaint about displacement. Itís like if you lived in a once prideful, historic Atlanta neighborhood that everyone called a ****hole, been through all the promises, propositions, and hardships of hanging in there, and then when the area is finally coming around at long last, you have to leave. I think you, ronricks, often use this platform to reiterate notions that are not necessarily true about these people.

Remember, just like all criminals are not poor, all poor people are not criminals. The overwhelming majority are just like you and me, but lack the knowledge, time, resources, and/or influence to pull their communities up on their own. I think all income levels can coexist in the city. But we ask that you not think of the people so monolithicly, and of course, donít be a hater
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:06 AM
 
1,624 posts, read 2,664,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I think it's tough to predict.

Remember, any type of recession or real estate bust could bring things to a grinding halt for 10 years or so.
I agree. My previous post was the best case scenario IMHO.
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:05 AM
 
2,071 posts, read 1,790,712 times
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Forgetting how loaded a term "Gentrifiable" is, and assuming we don't get Amazon, Apple, or some other biggies--there will probably be affordable housing within the city limits for quite a while --mainly in the less dense west side of the city that feels more like an old suburb--but, it will be the way it always is--folks will complain that they are lousy places to live for whatever reason, and ignore them, until they become super-desirable, and then folks will complain that they are too expensive.
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:14 AM
JPD
 
12,159 posts, read 15,026,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post

There's till TONS of land available ITP. It's not running out any time soon.
Agreed. There's absolutely no chance that the entire ITP, or even just City of Altlanta, will be fully gentrified within ten years. A lot will change in the next decade, but there will still be blight and gentrifiable neighborhoods. There always will be.
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Old 04-10-2018, 09:12 AM
 
769 posts, read 392,100 times
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I think there's just no way to tell. In 10 years, the same folks who were dying to live intown may be wanting to move back to the burbs. Right now it seem to be Millennials who are pushing to move intown, but as these folks mature, a lot of them may start longing for bigger, more affordable housing with yards and less-busy streets where kids can safely walk and bike to schools at the same time they find themselves with less time and energy for frequenting trendy bars and restaurants.

As for the people displaced, they will move out to the suburbs and more rural areas--the same places which used to be too exclusive and expensive for them in the past. This has actually been happening for some time.
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