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Old 04-10-2018, 10:17 AM
 
1,269 posts, read 633,621 times
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I think Atlanta could be fully gentrified in 15-20 years, maybe sooner if there's a catalyst and no major economic issues. The gentrification of Atlanta acts like a clock. 12pm has always been gentrified, then it started moving around through the Eastside neighborhoods, all the way down through Edgewood/Kirkwood (4pm) and East Atlanta (5pm). It's currently at about half past 6pm, which is Peoplestown and those areas. That will happen quick thanks to Turner field and Beltline, so I think we will get we will get stuck at 9pm (Bank head) for a while, before speeding through 10, 11, and back to 12 which are basically already there.

That will leave only the areas to the extreme SW of the city that aren't part of the circular "clock" around midtown. I think they will be the last to gentrify and it may take a very long time, but the rest of the city will be basically finished. I can't see that taking over 15 years.
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:21 AM
 
1,269 posts, read 633,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliDreaming01 View Post
I think there's just no way to tell. In 10 years, the same folks who were dying to live intown may be wanting to move back to the burbs. Right now it seem to be Millennials who are pushing to move intown, but as these folks mature, a lot of them may start longing for bigger, more affordable housing with yards and less-busy streets where kids can safely walk and bike to schools at the same time they find themselves with less time and energy for frequenting trendy bars and restaurants.

As for the people displaced, they will move out to the suburbs and more rural areas--the same places which used to be too exclusive and expensive for them in the past. This has actually been happening for some time.
I only agree with this if things stay stagnant. The reality is, however, that there will eventually come a tipping point where the CoA is safer than the suburbs. As city living gets more expensive and we get to a point where the cost of entry is prohibitive, we we will see crime rates drop and public schools increase in ranking. Meanwhile, as high earners leave suburbs to return to the now safer city with more amenities, we could see suburbs decline a bit.

Cost will always be a factor though.
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,181 posts, read 16,194,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliDreaming01 View Post
I think there's just no way to tell. In 10 years, the same folks who were dying to live intown may be wanting to move back to the burbs. Right now it seem to be Millennials who are pushing to move intown, but as these folks mature, a lot of them may start longing for bigger, more affordable housing with yards and less-busy streets where kids can safely walk and bike to schools at the same time they find themselves with less time and energy for frequenting trendy bars and restaurants.

As for the people displaced, they will move out to the suburbs and more rural areas--the same places which used to be too exclusive and expensive for them in the past. This has actually been happening for some time.
Are you saying the walk/bike to school rate is higher in car-centric suburbs?
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:33 AM
 
122 posts, read 62,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forhall View Post
I only agree with this if things stay stagnant. The reality is, however, that there will eventually come a tipping point where the CoA is safer than the suburbs. As city living gets more expensive and we get to a point where the cost of entry is prohibitive, we we will see crime rates drop and public schools increase in ranking. Meanwhile, as high earners leave suburbs to return to the now safer city with more amenities, we could see suburbs decline a bit.

Cost will always be a factor though.

I agree with this, I don't have a Ph.D in sociology or anything, but the city is where all the jobs and entertainment are, the "rich" have found a way to push their way back into the city and exclude other people i.e property taxes, zoning laws, income requirements, etc. I think eventually, homes in the heart of the city will turn into million dollar homes, and the further you get away from the city the less expensive the homes will be. I can't afford to buy yet, but if I buy i'll buy an urban single family home in the best neighborhood I can afford and hope I'm right. Besides offering bigger homes, I don't see how a suburban neighborhood can compete with an in city neighborhood if both are similar economically and demographically. Commuting and parking sucks.

And the reason I have "rich" in quotations is because an area getting richer is synonomous with it getting whiter. Even in a city like Atlanta where there are plenty of well educated and financially well off African Americans, we just don't have the type of wealth the white population has.

Last edited by kgpremed13; 04-10-2018 at 11:41 AM..
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:56 AM
 
28,153 posts, read 24,696,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Are you saying the walk/bike to school rate is higher in car-centric suburbs?
That honestly wouldn't surprise me at all.

Although the number of kids who walk to school these days is pretty low compared to the trek we were forced to make back in my day. There were no anti-bullying programs and we had to fight off mean dogs and toil along in the boiling sun as well as the driving rain.
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Old 04-10-2018, 12:02 PM
 
1,959 posts, read 1,645,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliDreaming01 View Post
I think there's just no way to tell. In 10 years, the same folks who were dying to live intown may be wanting to move back to the burbs. Right now it seem to be Millennials who are pushing to move intown, but as these folks mature, a lot of them may start longing for bigger, more affordable housing with yards and less-busy streets where kids can safely walk and bike to schools at the same time they find themselves with less time and energy for frequenting trendy bars and restaurants.
I think traffic is much more of an incentive to move to the city than trendinessóand traffic is not going to get any better any time soon.
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Old 04-10-2018, 12:16 PM
JPD
 
11,874 posts, read 14,490,836 times
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What happens regionally with transit will be a factor in this. If rail transit starts showing up in more counties, one of the incentives of intown living goes away, and it will be possible to live a more urban life (if that's what you desire) outside of the city than it is in many places inside the city.
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Old 04-10-2018, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,181 posts, read 16,194,283 times
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A scene from any other cluster in APS other than Grady.

Quote:
In fact, “Think Homewood” reveals just how much the old dichotomy of city vs. suburb is blurring. It proves a fact that would have been unthinkable 20 or 30 years ago: Suburbs now have to work to attract the cohort they were built for. As certain cities become more sought-after and lively, suburbs can no longer just sit back and wait for the inevitable stampede of first-time homebuyers and new parents. They have to convince skeptical young folk of their essential urbanity first.
https://www.citylab.com/life/2018/04...houses/557414/
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:20 PM
 
Location: City of Trees
1,061 posts, read 880,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
What is the cause of all the blight and crime? Especially for neighborhoods that went from being middle class with good schools and safe to being crime ridden ****holes in a matter of not even 10 years? Were those people coming with respect? Or does that not matter in that instance?
See above for Exhibit A of the kinds of attitudes moving into these neighborhoods.

The point is to stop looking at existing neighbors as the problem. Blight and crime often come from neighboring areas, and if it weren't for the people that have worked to hold the area together, there would be no neighborhood left.
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:22 PM
 
Location: City of Trees
1,061 posts, read 880,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
TROLL ALERT! Weíve discussed this on here many times before. The short answer is everyone who could (even black people) ran to the suburbs when that was in vogue. Itís not an issue of who came, itís an issue of who was left to stay... and what they were left to after a population-depleting mass exodus, brain drain, economic abandonment, and major disinvestment in the inner city throughout the 80ís and early nineties.

Iím not necessarily ďanti-gentrificationĒ, but letís not blame the victims here who were literally forced to live in these areas when they were all but abandoned by most people with means. That is the biggest complaint about displacement. Itís like if you lived in a once prideful, historic Atlanta neighborhood that everyone called a ****hole, been through all the promises, propositions, and hardships of hanging in there, and then when the area is finally coming around at long last, you have to leave. I think you, ronricks, often use this platform to reiterate notions that are not necessarily true about these people.

Remember, just like all criminals are not poor, all poor people are not criminals. The overwhelming majority are just like you and me, but lack the knowledge, time, resources, and/or influence to pull their communities up on their own. I think all income levels can coexist in the city. But we ask that you not think of the people so monolithicly, and of course, donít be a hater
Glad someone gets this. All the ronpricks can stay the hell away and "save" some other area.
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