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Old 04-11-2018, 02:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
I don't disagree. But I'm just curious about what you would consider a "never gonna happen" neighborhood?
I didn't make that statement with a specific neighborhood in mind. Rather, that there will always be some places left behind in any city. To think otherwise would mean you (not you specifically) believe the current upswing will never end or reverse.
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Old 04-11-2018, 03:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Forhall View Post

Minority status does not enter the equation. It's unfortunate that there is a correlation, but there are also many areas that are fully gentrified or close while still being diverse.


I want to believe this, but thee is a heavy racial component to gentrification. White people just do not want to live in a neighborhood where there are lots of black people, regardless if the area is safe, prosperous, or has good schools. There has to be a reason housing values in upper middle-class black neighborhoods stagnate, while housing values in places like Virginia Highland skyrocket. Take a look at the article below

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...using/atlanta/
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Old 04-11-2018, 05:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forhall View Post

Minority status does not enter the equation. It's unfortunate that there is a correlation, but there are also many areas that are fully gentrified or close while still being diverse.
Can you give an example of a fully gentrified area in Atlanta that is also racially (and/or economically) diverse?
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Old 04-11-2018, 06:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Forhall View Post
I'll bite. I don't think an area is gentrified, generally, until it's considered safe, has better than average public schools, strong public and private investment, is "well-kept" and pleasing to the eye, and strong demand. Safe generally means you only deal with nuisance crime, such as car break ins, and not major crimes like armed robberies or home break ins.
.
If this is the standard, then I agree that it would definitely take more than 10 years for the entire city to be fully gentrified, if ever. Can anyone name a comparable city that is completely fully gentrified?

Also, I wonder if all this could be had in an Atlanta neighborhood with homes that sell for around $250k or so? Or does quality inherently means extra expensive?
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Old 04-11-2018, 07:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otakumaster View Post
That doesn’t dismiss the fact that at some point the homes won’t be “affordable “ to the average Georgian once all the early people sell and thus those left behind will have to live in the suburbs.
Nobody is entitled to live anywhere. Doesn’t matter if it is in the city or the Atlanta suburbs. The fact that some people won’t be able to afford to live in the city and others will is meaningless. That will always be the case Gentrification or not. Someone having to live in the suburbs is a strawman. Nobody is forced to move to the suburbs.
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Old 04-11-2018, 09:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
If someone told me in 2008 that West End would be the way it is now, I don't think I would believe it.
Curious what is so special about West End. Looks like a bunch of standard single family homes, a few apartment complexes, and a bunch of chain and fast food restaurants. It's probably much improved, but I don't know if I'd consider it "gentrified".
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Old 04-12-2018, 03:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Curious what is so special about West End. Looks like a bunch of standard single family homes, a few apartment complexes, and a bunch of chain and fast food restaurants. It's probably much improved, but I don't know if I'd consider it "gentrified".
I wouldn’t consider it gentrified either. But if someone said in 2008 that homes in West End and surrounding areas would be selling for over $400k (like they are now), it would’ve been tough to believe. In 2008, people were leery about Kirkwood/Edgewood, etc. and that was when homes there were barely cracking $300k. Plus, at the time, there were a few high profile murders and robberies in those areas and EAV. Now look at those home values. In 2008, people would think you were absolutely crazy to consider buying a home in the West End area for more than $150k. I bought in Westview in 2015 for $175k, and some people thought I was naively overpaying back then. I still can’t believe how much demand has grown and the area has appreciated since then.

In terms of what makes the West End area so special, that has been discussed on here a lot too. But to keep it quick and simple, here are a few points.

1. West End is on the National Registry of Historic Places.
2. Has some of the oldest in tact housing stock in the city.
3. In terms of location, it is the western equivalent to Grant Park in terms of proximity to downtown, etc.
4. The Beltline and TONS of proposed development.
5. A rich and vibrant community and history

I’ve also mentioned before that people I know used to say the EXACT same thing you are saying about West End, but referring to Kirkwood, Edgewood, and even Grant Park. Over a decade ago, I thought the same thing about those areas until I actually toured the homes, walked around, went to the events, and just got off the main thoroughfares. It’s incredible how the perception of a community can change when you just get out the car, walk around, and talk to the people who live there. Think of RDA like Moreland or Boulevard — it has it’s rough or chain spots, but the real community is in the actual residential neighborhoods.

https://wendevents.ticketleap.com/hi...of-homes-2018/

Last edited by equinox63; 04-12-2018 at 03:41 AM..
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Old 04-12-2018, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,893 posts, read 32,901,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Curious what is so special about West End.
1. Its great location relative to the core city.
2. Its history and status as Atlanta's 'first' neighborhood.
3. It contains some of the best examples of late 19th century and early 20th century architecture in Atlanta.
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Old 04-12-2018, 06:22 AM
 
1,268 posts, read 629,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Can you give an example of a fully gentrified area in Atlanta that is also racially (and/or economically) diverse?
I would say Grant Park and Kirkwood are examples. I don't have recent stats, but I believe both neighborhoods are still at least 1/3 African American, and are both probably 90-95% "fully gentrified" other than 1 or 2 streets. Anytime I visit either one, I see people of every race pushing strollers, having breakfast, or strolling the park. The streets are well kept and I see families of all races outside doing yardwork on the same street.

I think both of those neighborhoods are very well integrated with little animosty and both are safe, desirable, and still on an upward trend.
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Old 04-12-2018, 06:46 AM
 
277 posts, read 89,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
Nobody is entitled to live anywhere.
You are arguing with yourself here as no one even implied this. The original post I was replying to was about the desirability of the surburbs in the *future* and who would live there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
Doesn’t matter if it is in the city or the Atlanta suburbs. The fact that some people won’t be able to afford to live in the city and others will is meaningless. That will always be the case Gentrification or not. Someone having to live in the suburbs is a strawman. Nobody is forced to move to the suburbs.

You contradict yourself . If one can’t afford to live somewhere they are forced to live where they can. That’s how capitalism works. Do you disagree?

Once ITP gentrifies only people who can afford it will live there. So everyone else will be forced to live in the burbs or the streets by the very definition of capitalism, do you disagree?
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