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Old 04-07-2018, 11:27 AM
 
158 posts, read 91,755 times
Reputation: 309

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The way houses are being bought up and renovated, I don't think so. Even better question, what the hell happens to all the poor people who use to live in these neighborhoods and rent the crappy houses? Yuppies/millennials are buying houses and getting into ownership, that's good I guess, but where do all the older, less educated, poor people go?
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
22,794 posts, read 34,834,369 times
Reputation: 14910
Heaven.
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Old 04-07-2018, 01:55 PM
 
Location: City of Atlanta
2,747 posts, read 1,698,653 times
Reputation: 3825
I can't imagine that Atlanta will be fully gentrified in 10 years. Even in desirable neighborhoods, there's still pockets of blight, like Trestletree Village in Grant Park and Edgewood Court Apartments in Edgewood. Despite its surge in the past few years, here in my neighborhood of Ormewood Park, there are still many poorly maintained or abandoned properties.
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Old 04-07-2018, 04:20 PM
 
1,420 posts, read 773,426 times
Reputation: 2067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pemgin View Post
I can't imagine that Atlanta will be fully gentrified in 10 years. Even in desirable neighborhoods, there's still pockets of blight, like Trestletree Village in Grant Park and Edgewood Court Apartments in Edgewood. Despite its surge in the past few years, here in my neighborhood of Ormewood Park, there are still many poorly maintained or abandoned properties.
Many times the affordable housing only has to be X% of the area median income. Right now that may be low enough that the spots you mentioned maintain issues of high crime and blight, but as the entire city gentrifies and the AMI of the neighborhoods shoot up, that percent of AMI will be a much higher number and will likely lead to a slow transition to where even the affordable housing in Atlanta is well-kept and crime free.
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Old 04-08-2018, 04:56 PM
 
108 posts, read 42,844 times
Reputation: 118
Just because people don't live in the best neighborhoods, doesn't mean that they're renters. I'm realizing a lot of people assume this, but I've known too many people to disprove this true.
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Old 04-08-2018, 07:52 PM
 
19 posts, read 18,902 times
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I think once every square inch of ITP is gentrified, you'll start to see some spillover to south and west of the 285. Dallas, GA, Clayton county, etc.
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Old 04-08-2018, 08:00 PM
Status: "Apparently not a person." (set 1 day ago)
 
4,985 posts, read 3,264,211 times
Reputation: 3322
Some will rent in older apartments buildings or new-but-basic ones a little further outside the main core.

I don't see the entire ITP being gentrified in the next ten years. Remember, it was nearly ten years ago that Old Fourth Ward started gentrifying, and it's barley finished itself.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:34 PM
 
8,270 posts, read 10,207,292 times
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Quote:
I think once every square inch of ITP is gentrified, you'll start to see some spillover to south and west of the 285. Dallas, GA, Clayton county, etc.
Definitely. So we'll look for that to happen around 2108.

There's till TONS of land available ITP. It's not running out any time soon.
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Old 04-08-2018, 10:08 PM
 
Location: ATL now
350 posts, read 406,535 times
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lol... @ this rate NO.

Just because it hasn't completely transformed the Intown neighborhoods, doesn't mean that it won't speedtail towards this in 10 years. O4W has about two years left before its completely gentrified. BLVD is the only problematic area, and they are going to clear out those old two story duplex for some condo conversions before you know it...

Too many people want the Beltline, commute time, amenities and the label of being back in the city. It's imaginary clout to the upperclass to be a part of the movement back to the city. I see it increasing in rate, and lawd forbid AMAZON claims ATL it will reach a new velocity
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Old 04-09-2018, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,491 posts, read 1,529,169 times
Reputation: 1631
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoiWonder13 View Post
lol... @ this rate NO.

Just because it hasn't completely transformed the Intown neighborhoods, doesn't mean that it won't speedtail towards this in 10 years. O4W has about two years left before its completely gentrified. BLVD is the only problematic area, and they are going to clear out those old two story duplex for some condo conversions before you know it...

Too many people want the Beltline, commute time, amenities and the label of being back in the city. It's imaginary clout to the upperclass to be a part of the movement back to the city. I see it increasing in rate, and lawd forbid AMAZON claims ATL it will reach a new velocity
I love how y’all always use O4W as an example in these types of threads, news flash though, the whole city isn’t built like that. What about those areas with low density, and houses that are 40-70 feet apart from each other, winding roads where it’s quicker to cut thru the woods behind your house to get to front street than it is to drive there? What do you do with areas like Glenrose Heights? Hollywood? Like we humans typically do, we’re all sheep crowding into the same parts of town. But off hand I know of a few areas inside COA that literally have nothing on them. Anyone with a brain could’ve rode down Lee St/Murphy Ave from WE to EP even 10 + years ago, seen those warehouses on the other side of the tracks, seen the Elevated subway line running thru, and probably could’ve seen hipsters and yuppies drinking coffee from corner cafes in their heads. Can’t say the same for a hood like Polar Rock or Arno Court, I don’t see hipsters digging those small frame houses on lots that’s pretty much the size of what you find in the rural south across the street from a field of kudzu. I’m sure those areas will eventually turn too, but it damn sure won’t be 10 years from now and it’s also going to require waaaaay more building, a lot more than we are seeing now. If we are using this urban model of using every available inch of space and going away from the splotchy here and there development of ATL past, then we got a ton of infill building to do.
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