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Old 04-17-2018, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Inman Park (Atlanta, GA)
21,871 posts, read 12,747,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Littleboysrule View Post
Can you please tell me how many students are typically admitted into Galloway for 5th, 6th and 9th?
Sorry - I don't know.
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:27 PM
 
145 posts, read 236,807 times
Reputation: 311
I have a rising third-grader at Galloway, and we started with first grade. Unfortunately, I can't fill you in on details about middle and upper learning admissions. When we toured schools, we considered Paideia, Pace, Westminster, Woodward and Galloway. We were very impressed with the kids at Paideia and Galloway. They were articulate, creative independent thinkers. We didn't know beforehand that they were sister schools, but after touring the others, we understood what was in their DNA that was so special and different from the more traditional options that were trying to employ some of the teaching and learning styles that Galloway and Paideia have done from the beginning.

My daughter comes home everyday excited to share her experiences and eager to return each morning. My mother-in-law is a retired public middle school teacher, and she's blown away with the things the kids are exposed to and master in second grade that her fifth-graders couldn't grasp. In first grade, they taught the kids the difference between fact and opinion and how to use resources online and in the library to support their writing. Right now, in second grade, they're learning how to write food and product reviews, which has led to some interesting battles as my daughter's whining about various things she does or doesn't want to do has turned into reasoned pro/con discussions that drive me crazy but I secretly am proud of.

The atmosphere at Galloway is very supportive, and it's not just coming from the teachers. The kids are supportive of each other and work collaboratively. These are key skills in today's modern workplace. Because the teacher-student ratio is about 9:1, there is plenty of individualized attention. If your kid has any learning differences, Galloway seems to catch problems earlier than other schools and refers a lot of kids to the Schenck School for a year or two before returning to Galloway.

You'll find the progress reports to be highly individualized as well. While Galloway doesn't do traditional letter grades, the kids are assessed as "consistently demonstrates," "progressing," and "needs strengthening. For each subject matter, each teacher writes a long, detailed narrative about your child's performance, and you can detect trends as they also assess social skills along with academics.

Galloway is part of a consortium of schools across the country that are working with admissions teams at colleges to understand this sort of transcript, which says more about your kid than an inflated GPA ever could. The incoming head of school, Dr. James Calleroz White, worked on the admissions team at Harvard and will be able to give more insight and be supportive of this new transcript.

One key thing a lot of people don't understand until they're on campus is the real sense of community. Parents have plenty of varied opportunities to contribute. You can be a parent who makes a career of volunteering in the school, or you can take on one piece of a project that you can do from your bed in 30 minutes. And let's face it, there are some schools where the parents give off a pretentious vibe, and that's rare at Galloway even with a significant population of parents who are movers and shakers in business, entertainment and politics.

One thing that may be a pro or con is the lack of a football program. This may be a deal breaker for some families, but there are plenty of other sports where kids can excel and get the attention of college athletics recruiters. Soccer, swimming, volleyball, golf, and track are huge, and they have opportunities from Kindergarten on up.

I know some people scan the schools where graduates end up, but take a moment to also read the alumni magazine that comes out quarterly to see where the graduates end up in life and not just the four to six years of college and grad school. I've been impressed with what they've accomplished, and they all credit their time at Galloway to lay the foundation for them to become life-long learners.

It sounds like I work at Galloway, but I'm just a parent who's swallowed the Kool-Aid. Atlanta has an embarrassment of riches to choose from when it comes to private schools. Do what feels right for your family because the financial commitment is huge, and you have to be comfortable with your decision.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:02 PM
 
60 posts, read 42,383 times
Reputation: 11
Thank you, very informative. I do appreciate it.
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Old 04-19-2018, 08:19 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,105 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cparker73 View Post
I have a rising third-grader at Galloway, and we started with first grade. Unfortunately, I can't fill you in on details about middle and upper learning admissions. When we toured schools, we considered Paideia, Pace, Westminster, Woodward and Galloway. We were very impressed with the kids at Paideia and Galloway. They were articulate, creative independent thinkers. We didn't know beforehand that they were sister schools, but after touring the others, we understood what was in their DNA that was so special and different from the more traditional options that were trying to employ some of the teaching and learning styles that Galloway and Paideia have done from the beginning.

My daughter comes home everyday excited to share her experiences and eager to return each morning. My mother-in-law is a retired public middle school teacher, and she's blown away with the things the kids are exposed to and master in second grade that her fifth-graders couldn't grasp. In first grade, they taught the kids the difference between fact and opinion and how to use resources online and in the library to support their writing. Right now, in second grade, they're learning how to write food and product reviews, which has led to some interesting battles as my daughter's whining about various things she does or doesn't want to do has turned into reasoned pro/con discussions that drive me crazy but I secretly am proud of.

The atmosphere at Galloway is very supportive, and it's not just coming from the teachers. The kids are supportive of each other and work collaboratively. These are key skills in today's modern workplace. Because the teacher-student ratio is about 9:1, there is plenty of individualized attention. If your kid has any learning differences, Galloway seems to catch problems earlier than other schools and refers a lot of kids to the Schenck School for a year or two before returning to Galloway.

You'll find the progress reports to be highly individualized as well. While Galloway doesn't do traditional letter grades, the kids are assessed as "consistently demonstrates," "progressing," and "needs strengthening. For each subject matter, each teacher writes a long, detailed narrative about your child's performance, and you can detect trends as they also assess social skills along with academics.

Galloway is part of a consortium of schools across the country that are working with admissions teams at colleges to understand this sort of transcript, which says more about your kid than an inflated GPA ever could. The incoming head of school, Dr. James Calleroz White, worked on the admissions team at Harvard and will be able to give more insight and be supportive of this new transcript.

One key thing a lot of people don't understand until they're on campus is the real sense of community. Parents have plenty of varied opportunities to contribute. You can be a parent who makes a career of volunteering in the school, or you can take on one piece of a project that you can do from your bed in 30 minutes. And let's face it, there are some schools where the parents give off a pretentious vibe, and that's rare at Galloway even with a significant population of parents who are movers and shakers in business, entertainment and politics.

One thing that may be a pro or con is the lack of a football program. This may be a deal breaker for some families, but there are plenty of other sports where kids can excel and get the attention of college athletics recruiters. Soccer, swimming, volleyball, golf, and track are huge, and they have opportunities from Kindergarten on up.

I know some people scan the schools where graduates end up, but take a moment to also read the alumni magazine that comes out quarterly to see where the graduates end up in life and not just the four to six years of college and grad school. I've been impressed with what they've accomplished, and they all credit their time at Galloway to lay the foundation for them to become life-long learners.

It sounds like I work at Galloway, but I'm just a parent who's swallowed the Kool-Aid. Atlanta has an embarrassment of riches to choose from when it comes to private schools. Do what feels right for your family because the financial commitment is huge, and you have to be comfortable with your decision.
Thank you so much for all this information -- we also were highly impressed after seeing how articulate the kids at Galloway were and that is exactly why we applied there although we hadn't heard as much about it as the other private schools such as Westminster, Pace and Lovett. We submitted our deposit for Galloway, so hoping we made the right choice!

One more question for you -- everyone seems to say that Galloway is unstructured, but I didn't really see anything on my tour that would lead me to believe it's unstructured. How do you feel about that?
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:37 AM
 
22 posts, read 13,905 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cparker73 View Post
I have a rising third-grader at Galloway, and we started with first grade. Unfortunately, I can't fill you in on details about middle and upper learning admissions. When we toured schools, we considered Paideia, Pace, Westminster, Woodward and Galloway. We were very impressed with the kids at Paideia and Galloway. They were articulate, creative independent thinkers. We didn't know beforehand that they were sister schools, but after touring the others, we understood what was in their DNA that was so special and different from the more traditional options that were trying to employ some of the teaching and learning styles that Galloway and Paideia have done from the beginning.

My daughter comes home everyday excited to share her experiences and eager to return each morning. My mother-in-law is a retired public middle school teacher, and she's blown away with the things the kids are exposed to and master in second grade that her fifth-graders couldn't grasp. In first grade, they taught the kids the difference between fact and opinion and how to use resources online and in the library to support their writing. Right now, in second grade, they're learning how to write food and product reviews, which has led to some interesting battles as my daughter's whining about various things she does or doesn't want to do has turned into reasoned pro/con discussions that drive me crazy but I secretly am proud of.

The atmosphere at Galloway is very supportive, and it's not just coming from the teachers. The kids are supportive of each other and work collaboratively. These are key skills in today's modern workplace. Because the teacher-student ratio is about 9:1, there is plenty of individualized attention. If your kid has any learning differences, Galloway seems to catch problems earlier than other schools and refers a lot of kids to the Schenck School for a year or two before returning to Galloway.

You'll find the progress reports to be highly individualized as well. While Galloway doesn't do traditional letter grades, the kids are assessed as "consistently demonstrates," "progressing," and "needs strengthening. For each subject matter, each teacher writes a long, detailed narrative about your child's performance, and you can detect trends as they also assess social skills along with academics.

Galloway is part of a consortium of schools across the country that are working with admissions teams at colleges to understand this sort of transcript, which says more about your kid than an inflated GPA ever could. The incoming head of school, Dr. James Calleroz White, worked on the admissions team at Harvard and will be able to give more insight and be supportive of this new transcript.

One key thing a lot of people don't understand until they're on campus is the real sense of community. Parents have plenty of varied opportunities to contribute. You can be a parent who makes a career of volunteering in the school, or you can take on one piece of a project that you can do from your bed in 30 minutes. And let's face it, there are some schools where the parents give off a pretentious vibe, and that's rare at Galloway even with a significant population of parents who are movers and shakers in business, entertainment and politics.

One thing that may be a pro or con is the lack of a football program. This may be a deal breaker for some families, but there are plenty of other sports where kids can excel and get the attention of college athletics recruiters. Soccer, swimming, volleyball, golf, and track are huge, and they have opportunities from Kindergarten on up.

I know some people scan the schools where graduates end up, but take a moment to also read the alumni magazine that comes out quarterly to see where the graduates end up in life and not just the four to six years of college and grad school. I've been impressed with what they've accomplished, and they all credit their time at Galloway to lay the foundation for them to become life-long learners.

It sounds like I work at Galloway, but I'm just a parent who's swallowed the Kool-Aid. Atlanta has an embarrassment of riches to choose from when it comes to private schools. Do what feels right for your family because the financial commitment is huge, and you have to be comfortable with your decision.
Thanks for this!!! It makes me so excited to send my boys there this fall!
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Old 04-23-2018, 03:18 PM
 
145 posts, read 236,807 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by abcswj View Post
Thank you so much for all this information -- we also were highly impressed after seeing how articulate the kids at Galloway were and that is exactly why we applied there although we hadn't heard as much about it as the other private schools such as Westminster, Pace and Lovett. We submitted our deposit for Galloway, so hoping we made the right choice!

One more question for you -- everyone seems to say that Galloway is unstructured, but I didn't really see anything on my tour that would lead me to believe it's unstructured. How do you feel about that?
I think the reputation of Galloway as being unstructured makes people uncomfortable because they think it's just some hippy dippy environment without a lot of rigor. It's a reputation rightfully earned from its early years in the 60s and probably from its current de-emphasis on GPAs and class rankings. Parents are afraid their kids may not be self-starters and wouldn't be able to handle it -- it does share some traits of Montessori. I'd say that there's a lot of rigor, and it comes from the kids as much as the teachers.

Early in the school year, my daughter's class wanted to start learning cursive, which normally isn't introduced until third grade. The teacher changed the curriculum halfway toward the end of the fall term since it seemed like they were ready (more than half the class was redshirted). They've learned to write nearly the entire alphabet, and now she and her classmates have a huge head start to their third-grade year.

A big focus I'm already seeing in my second-grader is the concept of working on a passion project, which by the time they're in Upper Learning, turns into self-directed learning that's more like working on a thesis. They're already learning how to do research in Early Learning, and it's only going to get better and more exacting.

Learning by playing/doing has been part of Galloway's DNA from the start, and any classroom you go in, you'll be hard-pressed to find a classroom where all the students are sitting in tidy rows listening to someone lecture. Because of that, the classes can seem a bit chaotic as each student or groups of students are working on their own thing on the floor, at the whiteboard, outside or on a table, but there's no doubt learning is happening. When we saw the classrooms at Pace, we were uninspired, though my daughter was all about the Hogwarts feel of the buildings.

One thing that Galloway acknowledges is it's kind of a hidden gem with a great history (it was the only private school that would admit MLK Jr.'s kids), and though they had a record number of applications this year, they're working on getting the word out.

If you haven't already, check out Galloway's YouTube channel to get a better feel.
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Old 04-24-2018, 11:25 AM
 
Location: ATL Shawty
38 posts, read 16,133 times
Reputation: 38
Curious to know how far each parent travels to take their children to Galloway? My son just turned 4 and I'd like to explore Galloway. We live about 40+ miles away, but will moving soon (northern suburbs). Is it worth the commute?
Not really good school options in the area we live and for about 20+ miles each way.
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Old 04-24-2018, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Dunwoody,GA
1,861 posts, read 4,554,426 times
Reputation: 1932
I'm not a Galloway parent, but I have been doing a 15-mile one-way private school commute for the past 10 years. For the majority of those years, I had a carpool and that was a lifesaver. This year for the first time, though, I am carpool-less. And I am counting the days until the end of the year. It has been exhausting and a real time-killer. I spend two hours a day driving, which certainly cuts into my work productivity. Really, really think about this before you commit. 12 or 13 years of the commute you propose will be super, super difficult. Move closer or find another school; that's my advice.
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Old 04-24-2018, 11:56 AM
 
Location: ATL Shawty
38 posts, read 16,133 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMMom View Post
I'm not a Galloway parent, but I have been doing a 15-mile one-way private school commute for the past 10 years. For the majority of those years, I had a carpool and that was a lifesaver. This year for the first time, though, I am carpool-less. And I am counting the days until the end of the year. It has been exhausting and a real time-killer. I spend two hours a day driving, which certainly cuts into my work productivity. Really, really think about this before you commit. 12 or 13 years of the commute you propose will be super, super difficult. Move closer or find another school; that's my advice.
Thank you for this info. I will be speaking with my husband about this. The area we want to move to has a good school system/cluster, however I'm finding my child to be very explorative(?) and as such I'd like to keep that going while he is in school. I'm doing my own types of activities with him at school.
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Old 04-24-2018, 12:30 PM
 
1,683 posts, read 1,668,089 times
Reputation: 1442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaw-Ga Peach View Post
Thank you for this info. I will be speaking with my husband about this. The area we want to move to has a good school system/cluster, however I'm finding my child to be very explorative(?) and as such I'd like to keep that going while he is in school. I'm doing my own types of activities with him at school.
Like CMMom, I have a long school commute (11 miles through town one-way) for one of my kids and it is extremely time consuming and mentally frazzling to the point that my work-life is basically on hold until I can get the child closer. Nevertheless, I do it because the child has unique interests and some academic challenges that make public school not a good fit.

What area are you thinking of living in? There are several private elementary schools that I can think of that have the same feel as Galloway. If you can't move closer but want a private & creative elementary school, there are some great ones. DO NOT drive 40 miles to a school.
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