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Old 04-23-2018, 09:13 AM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
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There are a lot of homes in Atlanta without garages. In fact, there are a few without driveways in the oldest parts of town.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:24 AM
 
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There are a lot of 1 car (and/or one person) households out there these days. These townhouses would be a great fit for many folks.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,236 posts, read 17,438,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Many of the trees I see being cut down certainly are 100+ years old. Some of them are over 100 feet tall as well. And it doesn't stop at the City Limits, it's also happening all over North DeKalb ITP neighborhoods.

As far as the City goes, I don't trust them. The outspoken head Arborist was fired several years ago, and the developers routinely get away with clear-cutting right up to the property lines - where they leave a tiny 'buffer' of small trees. The required replacements are very often pathetic.

Just as Fuqua gets to build whatever he wants, the developers pay the fines for clear-cutting and just keep things moving. It's basically out of control at this point.
Those fines go to planting of new trees.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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Ryan Gravel talks about missing middle housing in Atlanta, similar to this development, and how it can help.
Quote:
The need for this kind of housing is an enormous and largely untapped opportunity for both communities and builders. It’s called “missing middle” housing – the middle ground between single family houses and multi-story apartments that has been largely missing from American homebuilding for generations – certainly in places like Atlanta. It takes many forms, including traditional townhouses, row-houses, or brownstones, as well as small apartment buildings and individual garage apartments – what city planners call “accessory dwelling units,” or ADU’s.
In search of Atlanta's Missing Middle
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,181 posts, read 1,759,685 times
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https://www.reporternewspapers.net/2...dable-housing/

Here's an older article on the same project

Quote:
A Brookhaven developer said his company plans to build a 226-unit townhome complex off Buford Highway with units priced in the high $200,000 range as a way to fill a need for more affordable housing in the city and to also help transform the international corridor.

He noted the proposed project does not help low-income people but rather will be targeted toward people such as a police officer and a teacher who are married and each make $50,000 a year for a combined $100,000 annual income.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:25 AM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
9,894 posts, read 6,368,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Ryan Gravel talks about missing middle housing in Atlanta, similar to this development, and how it can help.

In search of Atlanta's Missing Middle
For Atlanta its even more than a missing middle. For single family houses zoned to very good schools ITP that didn't require a lot of work, its hard to find anything that many people can afford. When we were looking about 10 years ago, it seemed to take at least 800k. And with families, its hard to find the time to do that necessary work. There simply weren't many houses built from the 70s on under 7 figures. Those houses were all built in the burbs.

And there aren't many patio homes or townhomes around either ITP. I can only think of a couple of post war small lot subdivisions offhand, one on Rock Springs near Briarcliff and one near Mason Mill Park. There's one with smallish lots off DeKalb Avenue south of Lake Claire Park, but those seem to be pretty big houses. Still they fill a need for people who don't want big yards.

I disagree with Ryan that it takes more regulation. It takes less regulation.
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Old 04-23-2018, 04:25 PM
 
10,477 posts, read 7,463,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
For Atlanta its even more than a missing middle. For single family houses zoned to very good schools ITP that didn't require a lot of work, its hard to find anything that many people can afford. When we were looking about 10 years ago, it seemed to take at least 800k. And with families, its hard to find the time to do that necessary work. There simply weren't many houses built from the 70s on under 7 figures. Those houses were all built in the burbs.

And there aren't many patio homes or townhomes around either ITP. I can only think of a couple of post war small lot subdivisions offhand, one on Rock Springs near Briarcliff and one near Mason Mill Park. There's one with smallish lots off DeKalb Avenue south of Lake Claire Park, but those seem to be pretty big houses. Still they fill a need for people who don't want big yards.

I disagree with Ryan that it takes more regulation. It takes less regulation.
I don't see legalizing more housing types as "more regulation". I would consider it "less regulation" if anything. But honestly, it is more just a change. Going to a more form-based zoning than what we have now.

I think they should be legal to build basically anywhere one desires, but reality is single family homes in city centers are just never going to be very economical. That is why legalizing thing like 2 to 10 unit places and ADUs are so important, it can allow people to stay in their homes by bringing in additional streams of income to cover the mortgage and at the same time add affordable units to the area for new families.

EDIT: Ryan directly says "loosen regulations". I am not sure where you are getting "more regulation" from.

Quote:
1. What is the most important next step for Atlanta in order to start producing missing middle housing options?

We need to loosen regulations and allow ADUs and other small housing projects (2-10 units) in neighborhoods, and we should eliminate their parking requirements. Let’s let the market determine if people prefer off-street parking or better/larger/cheaper homes. The world is changing, and so is Atlanta – let’s give people an incentive to ditch their car.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,158 posts, read 3,442,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Those fines go to planting of new trees.
So you have no problem with the out of control deforestation going on. Got it.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:50 PM
 
10,477 posts, read 7,463,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
So you have no problem with the out of control deforestation going on. Got it.
JMatl, you seem to have no problem with trees getting cut down when it was in Piedmont Park or Grant Park for a new parking deck:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Same here, arjay. The plans and renderings look great as well, in my opinion.

I remember all of the heads exploding over the Piedmont Park deck, and look how wonderfully that turned out. You can barely see it, just as was promised.
And expanding suburbanization is way more harmful to the tree canopy & wildlife than densification within the city.

No, it seems you only like to latch onto being offended about other issues when it supports your vision of suburbia.

The double-standard palpable.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,158 posts, read 3,442,380 times
Reputation: 4358
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
JMatl, you seem to have no problem with trees getting cut down when it was in Piedmont Park or Grant Park for a new parking deck:



And expanding suburbanization is way more harmful to the tree canopy & wildlife than densification within the city.

No, it seems you only like to latch onto being offended about other issues when it supports your vision of suburbia.

The double-standard palpable.
You couldn't be more absolutely clueless if you tried.
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