U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-07-2018, 05:44 PM
 
2,489 posts, read 4,556,448 times
Reputation: 3104

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtloucks View Post

I just want to see kods running around and other families out that we may have some things in common.

There must be a few younger areas around there.
When I lived in a nice new house in Gwinnett county there were no kids out running around. The kids had their baseball practice,soccer games,swim lessons,music lessons,dance lessons,kumon lessons etc etc. When my kid wanted to play with his classmate that lived less than 1,000 ft. from him, we had to schedule it with a 3 week advance appointment.

In contrast one of my son's other classmates lived in a cheap apartment. That kid had lots of neighborhood friends because the apartment kids did not have a lot of scheduled activities.

The more upscale the neighborhood the less likely there will be kids running around with unscheduled time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-07-2018, 05:54 PM
 
7,687 posts, read 9,527,345 times
Reputation: 5657
I'm beginning to get the feeling that people try to discredit every great school by saying, "If your kids aren't overachievers, they'll fall through the cracks."

Maybe it's true...

But can you name a single excellent school in metro Atlanta people don't say this about?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2018, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,892 posts, read 9,586,933 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by capoeira View Post
When I lived in a nice new house in Gwinnett county there were no kids out running around. The kids had their baseball practice,soccer games,swim lessons,music lessons,dance lessons,kumon lessons etc etc. When my kid wanted to play with his classmate that lived less than 1,000 ft. from him, we had to schedule it with a 3 week advance appointment.

In contrast one of my son's other classmates lived in a cheap apartment. That kid had lots of neighborhood friends because the apartment kids did not have a lot of scheduled activities.

The more upscale the neighborhood the less likely there will be kids running around with unscheduled time.
This is true as well. I think my comment and this add up to why you might not see a bunch of kids running around outside in East Cobb. Schools are still pretty full from what I can tell. They aren't bursting at the seams like they were 20-30 years ago. I think they have leveled off as the area is pretty built out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2018, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,841 posts, read 1,252,650 times
Reputation: 1953
From experience, in an established (20-30 year old homes), upscale neighborhood there may actually be fewer kids. We live in a "kid perfect" neighborhood here in the Lake Spivey area (large family homes on acre plus lots on winding tree shaded street) what is the issue? Most of our neighbors found it "kid perfect", too and now are in their fifties and sixties and are "empty-nesters". Our elementary aged kids have basically NO ONE to play with except themselves (good thing we have three!) . Really, the only child their age around us lives with their great- grandparents, LOL!

That said, except for the lack of play mates, our community is STILL the ideal place to raise kids and they have a grand time playing in our large shady yard and riding bikes on our quiet, secluded street.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2018, 09:08 PM
 
205 posts, read 105,911 times
Reputation: 321
East Cobb has tons (tons) of families with kids! And they are constantly moving in, it seems like all home sales in my neighborhood are to families with young kids.

Do not be afraid, seriously, it’s kid central.

There is probably something going on with more kids playing inside, in backyards, at parks, or out shopping vs the past. My neighborhood often only gives off the kid vibe on the cul de sacs and at the pool. But they are everywhere and the families connect and have fun together. Yes, some empty nesters stay. As they should, it’s a great area.

Check out Jackson’s Creek. A little tight on your budget but doable. Constant influx of young families, active HOA with family and adults-only parties (ex. Guys march madness brought out 40 dudes). Established neighborhood with tall trees and colonial style homes. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 03:34 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL- For NOW
704 posts, read 657,550 times
Reputation: 798
Thank you to all so far. I agree that the day we live in simply proves that kids are either too busy with activities or in doors getting that much deserved video game time. Maybe part of it is because of all that. Maybe part is because there is a lot of older residents. Not sure. I want to believe that we are not the only 30s family with kids moving to one of the most popular areas in the country. And that many before us have moved there over the last few years. Just trying to figure out where they all are. Seems like Id have better luck finding Waldo having coffee with Carmen San Diego....

We just love Atlanta and especially Marietta. Have for many years. Long before East Cobb County Schools had anything to do with our love for the area. Just that having moved so many times and now making this our final stop to get through graduation, we want to find the right neighborhood more than the right house. We are not the type that falls in love with upgrades. We love a beautiful neighborhood with good people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,895 posts, read 32,892,157 times
Reputation: 12542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
From experience, in an established (20-30 year old homes), upscale neighborhood there may actually be fewer kids. We live in a "kid perfect" neighborhood here in the Lake Spivey area (large family homes on acre plus lots on winding tree shaded street) what is the issue? Most of our neighbors found it "kid perfect", too and now are in their fifties and sixties and are "empty-nesters". Our elementary aged kids have basically NO ONE to play with except themselves (good thing we have three!) . Really, the only child their age around us lives with their great- grandparents, LOL!

That said, except for the lack of play mates, our community is STILL the ideal place to raise kids and they have a grand time playing in our large shady yard and riding bikes on our quiet, secluded street.
CWG, you raise a very good point. Often neighborhoods have a 'life cycle' like this; it accounts for the rise and fall (and rise again) in local school populations. Case in point is my neighborhood of North Druid Hills in NW DeKalb. Young families began moving in during the mid to late 50's. The bulk of the children graduated from the local schools in the 70's, and the schools began to experience serious attrition by the 80's. The local HS (Briarcliff) was shuttered in 1983; with a peak population of 2000 in the 70's, it had an enrollment of under 800 at the time of its closing.
Now we come full circle. The local schools are bursting at the seams, and we are looking forward to a new expanded HS and a new MS in the immediate area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,892 posts, read 9,586,933 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
CWG, you raise a very good point. Often neighborhoods have a 'life cycle' like this; it accounts for the rise and fall (and rise again) in local school populations. Case in point is my neighborhood of North Druid Hills in NW DeKalb. Young families began moving in during the mid to late 50's. The bulk of the children graduated from the local schools in the 70's, and the schools began to experience serious attrition by the 80's. The local HS (Briarcliff) was shuttered in 1983; with a peak population of 2000 in the 70's, it had an enrollment of under 800 at the time of its closing.
Now we come full circle. The local schools are bursting at the seams, and we are looking forward to a new expanded HS and a new MS in the immediate area.
Exactly this. In the OP's target area, Pope, Kell and Sprayberry High Schools have gone from the largest classification to the second largest in sports. Lassiter was once the largest high school in the state, Cobb County building new schools to relieve moved it down the list but some of it is due to this maturing of a neighborhood. But as another poster listed above, East Cobb is still kid central. The schools might not be bursting at the seams any longer, but stable. And is that not a good thing? I don't foresee any decline. Because of its location and the reputation of the schools, this area will always be a draw for families with kids.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,895 posts, read 32,892,157 times
Reputation: 12542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
Exactly this. In the OP's target area, Pope, Kell and Sprayberry High Schools have gone from the largest classification to the second largest in sports. Lassiter was once the largest high school in the state, Cobb County building new schools to relieve moved it down the list but some of it is due to this maturing of a neighborhood. But as another poster listed above, East Cobb is still kid central. The schools might not be bursting at the seams any longer, but stable. And is that not a good thing? I don't foresee any decline. Because of its location and the reputation of the schools, this area will always be a draw for families with kids.
Frankly, I would rather my kids attend a 'stable' school than one dealing with overcrowding, pod classrooms and too-large class sizes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 04:43 PM
 
151 posts, read 63,007 times
Reputation: 199
My parents lived in East Cobb when I was in college and I lived with them a bit after college; the part wtih a Roswell address. Personally, I didn't care for the area. I did rent a house with some friends on Lower Roswell Road really liked it. I know a lot of people who grew up in East Cobb and now live in West Cobb in the Hillgrove HS district. That HS has really good ratings. If you get into Fulton/Roswell the property taxes are more than likely going to be triple what they would be in Cobb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top