U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-10-2018, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Downtown Marietta
1,062 posts, read 691,491 times
Reputation: 1334

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Amen.


The New Cities of East Cobb
Willeo Park
Sope Creek
Shallowford Heights (or Shallowford Forest)
Sandy Plains
Noonday Creek
Sounds about right. And I have nothing against East Cobb - it's a pleasant place and I am sure that those who live there really enjoy it. Because of the way addresses are allocated in the county, whenever I heard "Marietta," I used to just think of East Cobb - and that was after 15 years of living fairly nearby, in Smyrna. Now, I know better. The City of Marietta is a very different animal, one that I have come to really appreciate since moving here four years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-10-2018, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
674 posts, read 1,016,742 times
Reputation: 527
I think I read the population of Gwinnett is soon to surpass Fulton. So a lot of the growth of the metro is definetly still Gwinnnett although other portions are changing as well (COA infill, Northern Cobb, Cummming, etc ). I guess this could go for another post, but the post about “suburbs being increasingly sophisticated” is super true.

Seems like every downtown in these suburban cities (Suwanee, Duluth, Norcross, Woodstock, Alpharetta even are having their own density of shops, apartments, few homes etc.... Nothing CLEARLY compares to Atlanta though. I actually despise how some Alpharetta folks look down on Atlanta but then replicate what we have...That’s another topic though....

Regarding Gwinnett, City planners need get it together! So many people continue to move there, but there is no office prescence like Cobb who has significantly less people. At least Cobb has designated a portion of it`s county to contribute to the metro economy while still keeping that suburban feel for those that want it further up 75. Gwinnett can`t remain a bedroom community. Hopefully one day they densify near the arena. I think they have a good opportunity with the arena in the Sugarloaf area but with their voting patterns they still seem to oppose progression and are committing suicide.

Regarding Atlanta census, I think the population will definelty increase, seeing all the construction and people moving back in the city... Perhaps nearing 550Kish??? The white population clearly will increase while the black decreases, but black will still pack a punch and a notable prescence. We`ll still have a large lgbt population, but it seems like gentrification is moving the social scene. And Marta will still remain a gold mine densifying the areas close by.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2018, 10:46 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 632,780 times
Reputation: 1704
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolieandre View Post
I think I read the population of Gwinnett is soon to surpass Fulton. So a lot of the growth of the metro is definetly still Gwinnnett although other portions are changing as well (COA infill, Northern Cobb, Cummming, etc ). I guess this could go for another post, but the post about “suburbs being increasingly sophisticated” is super true.

Seems like every downtown in these suburban cities (Suwanee, Duluth, Norcross, Woodstock, Alpharetta even are having their own density of shops, apartments, few homes etc.... Nothing CLEARLY compares to Atlanta though. I actually despise how some Alpharetta folks look down on Atlanta but then replicate what we have...That’s another topic though....

Regarding Gwinnett, City planners need get it together! So many people continue to move there, but there is no office prescence like Cobb who has significantly less people. At least Cobb has designated a portion of it`s county to contribute to the metro economy while still keeping that suburban feel for those that want it further up 75. Gwinnett can`t remain a bedroom community. Hopefully one day they densify near the arena. I think they have a good opportunity with the arena in the Sugarloaf area but with their voting patterns they still seem to oppose progression and are committing suicide.

Regarding Atlanta census, I think the population will definelty increase, seeing all the construction and people moving back in the city... Perhaps nearing 550Kish??? The white population clearly will increase while the black decreases, but black will still pack a punch and a notable prescence. We`ll still have a large lgbt population, but it seems like gentrification is moving the social scene. And Marta will still remain a gold mine densifying the areas close by.
Agree on most points but unsure about 550k, seems high. Also I don't think gentrification is pushing out the LGBT community. Most are dual income no kids so if anything I've noticed a larger LGBT presence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2018, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,268,204 times
Reputation: 4205
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolieandre View Post
Regarding Gwinnett, City planners need get it together! So many people continue to move there, but there is no office prescence like Cobb who has significantly less people. At least Cobb has designated a portion of it`s county to contribute to the metro economy while still keeping that suburban feel for those that want it further up 75. Gwinnett can`t remain a bedroom community. Hopefully one day they densify near the arena. I think they have a good opportunity with the arena in the Sugarloaf area but with their voting patterns they still seem to oppose progression and are committing suicide.
True Cobb does have slightly higher employment, but Gwinnett has done a bit better than you might realize and it has Dekalb as a barrier that is closer to town than Cobb, but keeps Gwinnett slightly further away from town too. The Northeast corridor areas of Dekalb also bring a decent amount of jobs to the corridor, that make it hard to get a perfect geographical equal comparison on distance out of town.

One mistake to make would be to only use tall building to justify jobs. Cobb certainly excels here and has more of their office space built near Cumberland than further out towards Marietta and Kennesaw.

Gwinnett is close to break even at supplying as many jobs as it has citizens, so it contributes a good deal.

In 2015...
Gwinnett had 299k jobs.
Cobb had 310k.
Dekalb had 262k
Fulton having the core of the city, Perimeter, and North Fulton has 705k.

In terms of office space:

Colliers uses Northwest, Northeast, and Northlake. Northwest is primarily Cobb and up the I-75 corridor NW. Northeast is primarily Gwinnett and further up I-85. Northlake is Northern Dekable that is not in the Central Perimeter area.

Northwest brings in a strong 36.6 million square feet of office space
Northlake brings in 17.3 million square feet of office space.
Northeast brings in 24.3 million square feet of office space.


Gwinnett done a decent job, although it isn't cobb. Most of it is attributed to Dekalb being a part of the northeast corridor.

Key differences is how Gwinnett builds itself. Its job centers are lower and more spread out. The largest concentration is Peacthree Corners, which is where about just under half of Gwinnett's office space is. The office buildings are a lot of 1 to 8 store tall buildings, often hidden behind trees too.

The real suburban behemoth's are Central perimeter and North Fulton, with 29.6 msf and 28.6 msf... respectively. (keep in mind added together they are a 58.2 msf northern corridor)


The Buckhead/Midtown/Downtown markets contribute 74msf of office space, however it is worth noting that colliers doesn't include certain government office space that is never rented out of sold. So the intown market has a decent amount of this left out of the total, primarily in downtown.


Gwinnett has the region's largest industrial concentration as well. The Northeast corridor (including parts of Dekalb and Hall) is the largest.

The northeast corridor includes 197msf of industrial properties (includes Doraville outside 285).
North corridor has 30.6 msf.
The Northwest corridor has 73.8 msf
The Southern corridors (75 and 85 together, and inside the perimeter around the airport) has 183.4 msf.
Fulton Industrial and west is 102.7 msf.
I-20 east is 47.2 msf

So the story of Gwinnett's economic might is that its bi-polar and adjustable and it depends heavily on its industrial backbone. You can operate office and industrial properties close together. Where as other spaces tend to be mostly industrial or mostly office.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 01:07 AM
 
5,388 posts, read 4,903,585 times
Reputation: 3573
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolieandre View Post
Regarding Gwinnett, City planners need get it together! So many people continue to move there, but there is no office prescence like Cobb who has significantly less people. At least Cobb has designated a portion of it`s county to contribute to the metro economy while still keeping that suburban feel for those that want it further up 75. Gwinnett can`t remain a bedroom community. Hopefully one day they densify near the arena. I think they have a good opportunity with the arena in the Sugarloaf area but with their voting patterns they still seem to oppose progression and are committing suicide.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
True Cobb does have slightly higher employment, but Gwinnett has done a bit better than you might realize and it has Dekalb as a barrier that is closer to town than Cobb, but keeps Gwinnett slightly further away from town too. The Northeast corridor areas of Dekalb also bring a decent amount of jobs to the corridor, that make it hard to get a perfect geographical equal comparison on distance out of town.

One mistake to make would be to only use tall building to justify jobs. Cobb certainly excels here and has more of their office space built near Cumberland than further out towards Marietta and Kennesaw.

Gwinnett is close to break even at supplying as many jobs as it has citizens, so it contributes a good deal.

In 2015...
Gwinnett had 299k jobs.
Cobb had 310k.
Dekalb had 262k
Fulton having the core of the city, Perimeter, and North Fulton has 705k.

In terms of office space:

Colliers uses Northwest, Northeast, and Northlake. Northwest is primarily Cobb and up the I-75 corridor NW. Northeast is primarily Gwinnett and further up I-85. Northlake is Northern Dekable that is not in the Central Perimeter area.

Northwest brings in a strong 36.6 million square feet of office space
Northlake brings in 17.3 million square feet of office space.
Northeast brings in 24.3 million square feet of office space.


Gwinnett done a decent job, although it isn't cobb. Most of it is attributed to Dekalb being a part of the northeast corridor.

Key differences is how Gwinnett builds itself. Its job centers are lower and more spread out. The largest concentration is Peacthree Corners, which is where about just under half of Gwinnett's office space is. The office buildings are a lot of 1 to 8 store tall buildings, often hidden behind trees too.

The real suburban behemoth's are Central perimeter and North Fulton, with 29.6 msf and 28.6 msf... respectively. (keep in mind added together they are a 58.2 msf northern corridor)


The Buckhead/Midtown/Downtown markets contribute 74msf of office space, however it is worth noting that colliers doesn't include certain government office space that is never rented out of sold. So the intown market has a decent amount of this left out of the total, primarily in downtown.


Gwinnett has the region's largest industrial concentration as well. The Northeast corridor (including parts of Dekalb and Hall) is the largest.

The northeast corridor includes 197msf of industrial properties (includes Doraville outside 285).
North corridor has 30.6 msf.
The Northwest corridor has 73.8 msf
The Southern corridors (75 and 85 together, and inside the perimeter around the airport) has 183.4 msf.
Fulton Industrial and west is 102.7 msf.
I-20 east is 47.2 msf

So the story of Gwinnett's economic might is that its bi-polar and adjustable and it depends heavily on its industrial backbone. You can operate office and industrial properties close together. Where as other spaces tend to be mostly industrial or mostly office.
cwkimbro makes some excellent points here about the amount of office and industrial commercial space in metro Atlanta, including in Gwinnett County.

cwkimbro's excellent comments on this thread raise the very important point that Gwinnett County (and its ultra-diverse population of nearly 1 million residents) has become a major economic driver for the greater Atlanta metropolitan region and the state of Georgia.

Just because Gwinnett County does not have the hub of high-rise office commercial development that Cobb County has in the Cumberland District does not mean that Gwinnett County is not a massively important economic contributor to the economy of the Atlanta metropolitan area and the state of Georgia.

Like cwkimbro alluded to, Gwinnett is home to one of the largest regional hubs of employment in the Atlanta region in the Peachtree Corners/Norcross area and on up the I-85 Northeast, Georgia 316 and I-985 corridors... The massive amount of jobs, employment and commercial development that the county has makes Gwinnett a major economic player in the Atlanta region and the state of Georgia.

coolieandre also makes an excellent point that heavily-populated suburban counties like Gwinnett need to be good at more than just being bedroom communities... Something which Gwinnett has made an effort to do with its large cluster of office and industrial commercial development in the Peachtree Corners, Norcross, Duluth, Suwanee, Lawrenceville and Buford areas.

Though, it should also be recognized that there is nothing wrong with a heavily-populated suburban county like Gwinnett having a strong 'bedroom community' element to its way-of-life.

Other heavily-populated suburban counties like Cobb and North Fulton may have more high-rise and higher-rise office commercial development in areas like Cumberland, Perimeter Center and the Georgia 400 North corridor... But much like in heavily-populated Gwinnett, heavily-populated suburban counties like Cobb and North Fulton also have exceptionally strong 'bedroom community' type elements (that include attractive housing stock and excellent public schools) that not only make them extremely attractive targets and extremely strong draws for relocating families with children but also make them very attractive targets for corporate relocations.

One of Gwinnett County's major strengths has been and will continue to be its exceptionally strong public school system... Along with its excellent location northeast of Atlanta along Interstate 85, Gwinnett's exceptionally strong public school system has played a leading role in propelling the county's population to nearly 1 million residents.

...So the 'bedroom community' element of life in Gwinnett (especially in regards to Gwinnett being a leading bedroom community to a booming city/metro of international importance like Atlanta) cannot and should not be downplayed as the community moves forward into a different era of existence as a large urban county that is more than just a bedroom community.

Last edited by Born 2 Roll; 05-11-2018 at 01:48 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 08:24 AM
 
28,150 posts, read 24,687,439 times
Reputation: 9549
Gwinnett doesn't need highrises to keep being an economic powerhouse. (Nor does anyplace else, for that matter). Gwinnett's got great roads, parks, industry, schools, and neighborhoods. The one thing they might want to look into is flooding the zone with modern, efficient buses running on frequent headways. They could be the lifeline for many Gwinnett commuters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 01:56 PM
 
206 posts, read 101,481 times
Reputation: 287
The metro is line to hit 6 million in 2019 - 2020.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 02:05 PM
 
28,150 posts, read 24,687,439 times
Reputation: 9549
I'm guessing that both the COA and the metro area will be up 12% over where they were in 2010.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 04:41 PM
 
1,137 posts, read 475,899 times
Reputation: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Gwinnett doesn't need highrises to keep being an economic powerhouse. (Nor does anyplace else, for that matter). Gwinnett's got great roads, parks, industry, schools, and neighborhoods. The one thing they might want to look into is flooding the zone with modern, efficient buses running on frequent headways. They could be the lifeline for many Gwinnett commuters.
Yeah, out of the entire metro I too feel Gwinnett had the most aquedate road system and several large avenues. Only thing I wish Gwinnett had was a rail network to Downtown, whether it have been MARTA, Commuter, or even light.

My blessing was in my later years of living in Gwinnett my commute transformed to a 5 mile local commute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2018, 06:08 PM
 
4,228 posts, read 4,123,088 times
Reputation: 3191
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Gwinnett doesn't need highrises to keep being an economic powerhouse. (Nor does anyplace else, for that matter). Gwinnett's got great roads, parks, industry, schools, and neighborhoods. The one thing they might want to look into is flooding the zone with modern, efficient buses running on frequent headways. They could be the lifeline for many Gwinnett commuters.
Your last sentence " They could be the lifeline for many Gwinnett commuters."

Makes the an issue for the first "Gwinnett doesn't need highrises to keep being an economic powerhouse."


I pretty sure they would be open to highrise but that not end all of urbanism. Gwinnett leaders and etc want a more organized business area and with density and retail in stead of being sprawl out, which forces commuting in the first place. Basically they want a diversity of housing and lifestyle choices as well.


So areas like Gwinnett Place CID, Gwinnet85 "Gwinnett Village" are looking at Cumberland, Perimeter Center, and even alpharetta growth.

Gwinnett Place CID officials looking at conceptual mixed-use redevelopment of area | News | gwinnettdailypost.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top