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Old 08-31-2018, 07:41 AM
 
291 posts, read 90,301 times
Reputation: 162

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Lindbergh Center Station is the 2nd major transfer point in the MARTA rail system. It has bus connections and is a top 5 station is the # of riders tapping in.

I think the Armour Infill make some sense, but... you're right about the bus hub at Lindbergh. There would need to be some decently-tricky (politically, if nothing else) new roads out of Armour Yards built if you ever want to put the bus hub there instead of Lindbergh.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,140,747 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by autolycus25 View Post
I think the Armour Infill make some sense, but... you're right about the bus hub at Lindbergh. There would need to be some decently-tricky (politically, if nothing else) new roads out of Armour Yards built if you ever want to put the bus hub there instead of Lindbergh.
I like the idea of creating major hubs at Lindbergh and Avondale, both have many bus connections. Armour infill would serve railroad transfers, but then forcing 2 transfers for bus connections from Lindbergh.
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Old 08-31-2018, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,147 posts, read 16,140,747 times
Reputation: 4894
Good reading material
https://www.citylab.com/transportati...ransit/568825/
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Old 08-31-2018, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,709 posts, read 1,983,890 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
I support rail.

But the answer isn't so simplistic.

Those old transit lines were grossly polluting, didn't have AC, and didn't have the technology that's expensive to maintain.

Ridership is falling in Atl, Charlotte and LA, even Portland I think.

When people have money they perceive driving in their own personal chariot as the best regardless of stress, delays.

Washington's metro is so dilapidated that people can't count on service anymore so they've quit using it.

Tens of billions is necessary to bring it back to normal, maintenance neglect,though, is to blame for its problems.


I think we need some lighter-weight plastic train cars that are easier to propel and cheaper to build.


2 million per rail car for a heavy, all metal contraption is not being innovated like everything around us.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:20 PM
bu2
 
8,968 posts, read 5,658,755 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
I like the idea of creating major hubs at Lindbergh and Avondale, both have many bus connections. Armour infill would serve railroad transfers, but then forcing 2 transfers for bus connections from Lindbergh.
I like the idea of people not HAVING to transfer at Lindberg or Avondale as LRT forces them to do.
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:26 PM
bu2
 
8,968 posts, read 5,658,755 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Arjay would like this!
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:28 PM
bu2
 
8,968 posts, read 5,658,755 times
Reputation: 3529
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
I support rail.

But the answer isn't so simplistic.

Those old transit lines were grossly polluting, didn't have AC, and didn't have the technology that's expensive to maintain.

Ridership is falling in Atl, Charlotte and LA, even Portland I think.

When people have money they perceive driving in their own personal chariot as the best regardless of stress, delays.

Washington's metro is so dilapidated that people can't count on service anymore so they've quit using it.

Tens of billions is necessary to bring it back to normal, maintenance neglect,though, is to blame for its problems.


I think we need some lighter-weight plastic train cars that are easier to propel and cheaper to build.


2 million per rail car for a heavy, all metal contraption is not being innovated like everything around us.
Ridership last year dropped everywhere except Seattle, which is spending unprecedented billions and Houston, which revamped their 40 year old bus routes (and is doing some of the things in cq's linked article).
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Old 09-01-2018, 05:16 PM
 
28,101 posts, read 24,632,008 times
Reputation: 9523
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Arjay would like this!
I sure do!

The key to building transit ridership is convenience. Make it frequent, dependable and reasonably close and people will ride.

If you can walk to the corner and be reasonably sure a bus will be along in a few minutes, you may just hop on. But if you've got to walk half a mile and wait indefinitely in the boiling sun, folks who can afford it will look for something else.
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Old 09-01-2018, 07:02 PM
 
4,240 posts, read 2,816,756 times
Reputation: 2758
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I sure do!

The key to building transit ridership is convenience. Make it frequent, dependable and reasonably close and people will ride.

If you can walk to the corner and be reasonably sure a bus will be along in a few minutes, you may just hop on. But if you've got to walk half a mile and wait indefinitely in the boiling sun, folks who can afford it will look for something else.
Of course. I have the choice between a typical 25-minute car trip, or a minimum 87-minute bus trip, including nearly a mile of walking. So, round-trip, it's 50 minutes vs. likely more than three hours. And since I often have only 10 hours between getting off work and being back at work, taking three hours to make the commute is a non-starter. If the choice was more reasonable, I might. But the reasonable choice is not making my car trip take 90 minutes.
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Old 09-01-2018, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,442 posts, read 2,816,679 times
Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Of course. I have the choice between a typical 25-minute car trip, or a minimum 87-minute bus trip, including nearly a mile of walking. So, round-trip, it's 50 minutes vs. likely more than three hours. And since I often have only 10 hours between getting off work and being back at work, taking three hours to make the commute is a non-starter. If the choice was more reasonable, I might. But the reasonable choice is not making my car trip take 90 minutes.
Plus the misery of standing in the heat/cold/wind.
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