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Old 05-18-2018, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,691 posts, read 16,711,706 times
Reputation: 5094

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Unbundling of costs of parking and rent is a great start!
Quote:
For example, last week City Planning Commissioner Tim Keane kicked off the search for a developer of a proposed south downtown residential tower, with the hope of featuring something rare in Atlanta — a “car-free lifestyle.”

“Encouraging a high level of density, what is contemplated is a multi-story residential tower, ground-floor retail ... and no additional parking spaces,” according to the city’s request for information.

The project is a reminder that parking is a likely inflection point on the city’s arc toward becoming a more dense, vibrant, urban environment.

Maybe Enrique Peñalosa, former mayor of Bogota, Colombia, had it right when he said, “A city can be friendly to people, or it can be friendly to cars, but it can’t be both.”

For Atlanta, long the poster child of sprawl, time will tell.

“Think about all the cities you’ve enjoyed and name what they all had in common,” said Karl Smith-Davids, a senior project manager with Midtown Alliance. “Parking was always secondary to your experience. It was probably out-of-sight and out-of-mind. That’s because cars are never the lifeblood of a great city. People are.”

As boring or technical as a discussion about parking may seem, consider how many quality of life issues it touches across the city.

‘The affordability challenge’

Parking is costly, sometimes as much as $25,000 per space in dense, urban areas where decks are required. That can add millions to the costs of building a residential tower.

Developers have to adjust, often by increasing rents, but that contributes to growing concerns about an overall lack of affordability for people who want to live in the city.

As of March, median rents had climbed to $1,546 per month, according to Zillow. That’s up 4 percent year-over-year. A few units in new towers overlooking Midtown and Buckhead are even approaching $3,000 a month.

The proposed downtown residential building wouldn’t have a new parking deck. Spaces could be provided in an existing, nearby parking garage.

Residents who don’t need parking spots may be able to give them away in exchange for lower rents. It’s called “unbundling,” or separating parking costs from all the other costs of living or working in a building. It’s common in cities such as Portland, Ore., and Seattle, but it’s still rare here.

The city hopes the units can help firefighters, teachers and other government employees who want to stay in the neighborhood but may not be able to keep up with escalating housing costs.

More than one in four renters in the city pay at least half of their monthly income on housing, according to the planning department. Low-income renters are competing for an increasingly scarce supply of affordable apartments.

‘Productive neighborhoods’

These days architect Eric Kronberg spends spends a lot of time in city planning offices. He’s got plenty of new projects, and some have far too much required parking in neighborhoods where people are encouraged to walk and bike or take a train. So, he’s asking the city to help him erase many of those required parking spaces from the plans.

For example, he was granted a reduction of 1,476 parking spaces at the Lee+ White project, which is being developed by Stream Realty. It features 23 acres of brick warehouses re-purposed into food and beverage destinations alongside the Atlanta Beltline’s Westside Trail. It’s a place people want to walk and bike. One day, it may have light rail.

Kronberg asked for a total reduction of parking spaces at Lee+White from the required 2,228. It ended up with 752. It was a reminder that parking requirements are often based on long-outdated suburban models.

Planners are updating them to fit a rapidly urbanizing Atlanta. It’s about time, Kronberg says. He believes over-parking undermines a city’s potential. It eats up land that could be developed as offices, housing, restaurants and entertainment.

“Parking is just a tax on productive neighborhoods,” he said.

‘America lost its way’

In Midtown, Kip Dunlap says he’s like a “sherpa” for the tenants of Colony Square, the aging mixed-use project at 14th and Peachtree that’s getting a major upgrade.

His official title is “mobility concierge.”

Basically, he shows all the people coming to and from Colony Square how they can explore Atlanta — without using their cars. For example, he might accompany a group of tenants on a MARTA ride from Midtown to the suburbs.

Sometimes, it’s as simple as making sure everyone has their MARTA passes. Other times, he’s recommending the best restaurants along the route. The job never fails to remind him Atlanta is still shedding its autocentric past.

“One of the first things I noticed was that a lot of commuters didn’t even know the MARTA station is right across the street from us,” Dunlap said.

Mark Toro, whose company, North American Properties, is redeveloping Colony Square, believes the time has come for Atlanta’s over-dependence on the car to end. For example, he’s passed on potential Colony Square office tenants that wanted extra parking for their employees.

“The world is changing,” Toro said. “It’s time that we changed with them.”

The more Colony Square tenants or residents take the train, ride a bike, or decide to walk, it reduces the need for additional parking at the project. That gives Colony Square more space to devote for new housing, offices and amenities such as hotels and restaurants.

“I think America lost its way after World War II,” Dunlap said. “It began this retreat from urban living. I wish I were seeing more progress, but it takes just a small nudge to change a way of thinking.”
https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/...rossroads.html
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:03 PM
bu2
 
9,260 posts, read 5,934,125 times
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America didn't lose its way. It offered people freedom. Once people had more money than time, they chose time.

But parking costs should not be hidden. Have them transparent. It will encourage transit ridership.

But Atlanta NEEDS more roads. Its not just rush hour that is a problem. Traveling on the connector at 11:30 the other day it was bumper to bumper southbound until beyond I-20, even in the HOV lane. Traveling northbound, it was stop and go bumper to bumper from the 75/85 split to downtown and beyond. Transit will never cover a significant portion of the non-peak hour traffic. Car free people will always be a tiny minority in Atlanta.

And that connector traffic was NOT atypical. It is backed up all morning in those areas and I think it is in the pre-rush hour afternoon as well.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:05 PM
 
1,252 posts, read 543,604 times
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Its interesting, and a nice start, but Atlanta is far from ready for this on a large scale unless transit really takes off, especially in the suburban areas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
America didn't lose its way. It offered people freedom. Once people had more money than time, they chose time.

But parking costs should not be hidden. Have them transparent. It will encourage transit ridership.

But Atlanta NEEDS more roads. Its not just rush hour that is a problem. Traveling on the connector at 11:30 the other day it was bumper to bumper southbound until beyond I-20, even in the HOV lane. Traveling northbound, it was stop and go bumper to bumper from the 75/85 split to downtown and beyond. Transit will never cover a significant portion of the non-peak hour traffic. Car free people will always be a tiny minority in Atlanta.

And that connector traffic was NOT atypical. It is backed up all morning in those areas and I think it is in the pre-rush hour afternoon as well.
I would have to agree with this. After driving through Houston and Austin, despite the levels of traffic being quite high..it is exponentially easier to get around those cities...night and day no contest whatsoever. Grid layout, redundant highway networks, more high capacity streets.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,691 posts, read 16,711,706 times
Reputation: 5094
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
America didn't lose its way. It offered people freedom. Once people had more money than time, they chose time.

But parking costs should not be hidden. Have them transparent. It will encourage transit ridership.

But Atlanta NEEDS more roads. Its not just rush hour that is a problem. Traveling on the connector at 11:30 the other day it was bumper to bumper southbound until beyond I-20, even in the HOV lane. Traveling northbound, it was stop and go bumper to bumper from the 75/85 split to downtown and beyond. Transit will never cover a significant portion of the non-peak hour traffic. Car free people will always be a tiny minority in Atlanta.

And that connector traffic was NOT atypical. It is backed up all morning in those areas and I think it is in the pre-rush hour afternoon as well.
The Downtown Connector will not see any increase in capacity, it's built out. Land acquisition would be too high and then what do you do about the W Peachtree crossing? That's a MARTA station above the freeway.
Suburban Atlanta may need more roads, but City of Atlanta does not need more or wider streets.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:39 PM
 
1,252 posts, read 543,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
The Downtown Connector will not see any increase in capacity, it's built out. Land acquisition would be too high and then what do you do about the W Peachtree crossing? That's a MARTA station above the freeway.
Suburban Atlanta may need more roads, but City of Atlanta does not need more or wider streets.
Not necessarily downtown - but noting eventually that W Peachtree Station is going to have to be addressed one way or another. Bridges cant last forever.

IF... any additional lanes were to be built ITP...they need to be tolled express lanes, and they also need to be underground.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:48 PM
 
405 posts, read 483,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Its not just rush hour that is a problem. Traveling on the connector at 11:30 the other day it was bumper to bumper southbound until beyond I-20, even in the HOV lane. Traveling northbound, it was stop and go bumper to bumper from the 75/85 split to downtown and beyond. Transit will never cover a significant portion of the non-peak hour traffic. Car free people will always be a tiny minority in Atlanta.

And that connector traffic was NOT atypical. It is backed up all morning in those areas and I think it is in the pre-rush hour afternoon as well.
Absolutely.

When I moved here in 2000, you could basically count on major traffic snarls from 7-10am and 3-7pm, M-F. Now, it's extremely random and frustrating. Jump in the car on Sunday afternoon, midday during the week - doesn't matter. It's always something. Yesterday I left work near Centennial Park around 11:40am to head north to N. Druid Hills on 85. Traffic was TOAST in both directions, with no accident to be found or reported on any of the traffic apps. I experience these types of random jams more often than not.

We are full.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,691 posts, read 16,711,706 times
Reputation: 5094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Not necessarily downtown - but noting eventually that W Peachtree Station is going to have to be addressed one way or another. Bridges cant last forever.

IF... any additional lanes were to be built ITP...they need to be tolled express lanes, and they also need to be underground.
We could us the billions to tunnel more car lanes and build out our transit system.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:51 PM
 
1,252 posts, read 543,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
We could us the billions to tunnel more car lanes and build out our transit system.
I really dont think ITP needs more lanes, I-75 and I-85 are more than wide enough. Whats needed is redundancy.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,691 posts, read 16,711,706 times
Reputation: 5094
Quote:
Originally Posted by gold15 View Post
Absolutely.

When I moved here in 2000, you could basically count on major traffic snarls from 7-10am and 3-7pm, M-F. Now, it's extremely random and frustrating. Jump in the car on Sunday afternoon, midday during the week - doesn't matter. It's always something. Yesterday I left work near Centennial Park around 11:40am to head north to N. Druid Hills on 85. Traffic was TOAST in both directions, with no accident to be found or reported on any of the traffic apps. I experience these types of random jams more often than not.

We are full.
We are not full.

Atlanta
Atlanta
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:53 PM
 
1,252 posts, read 543,604 times
Reputation: 1052
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
We are not full.

Atlanta
Atlanta
Honestly it would be quite scary if a region that big densified to capacity..infact nightmarish.
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