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Old 01-16-2019, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,046 posts, read 9,754,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
It's Atlanta's elevation that helps make it's Summers less intense than other southern cities summers.
The word LESS as you have used it doesn't amount to a whole lot. It's still sweltering and humid and rough all over the south in the summer. The humidity is what makes things miserable. 90 degrees and 100% humidity is just as bad as 100+ but lower humidity.
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Old 01-16-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,046 posts, read 9,754,857 times
Reputation: 5556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
If I'm not mistaken I believe Spaghetti Junction's engineering was based off the stacks seen in California, probably not as overly engineered as those stacks are which have to withstand earthquakes (and occasionally still fail to). I'm not well versed in many of the stacks over in LA or San Francisco. Some of them seemed fairly new... fairly... others looked severely under planned and questionably interstate grade. Alot of California freeways are also state maintained routes so not sure if federal funding went into their designs. Actually some of their state routes would be impossible to distinguish from an actual interstate. Others seem very old and more like the parkways found in New England.

This is all opinion based but when it comes to Stacks I think Texas pretty much owns the book as just about every single freeway to freeway and sometimes even surface roads has a flyover that makes it seem like traffic is literally coming out of the sky. I happen to live near one currently for a toll road. They're pretty impressive stuff, they build them over access roads and braided ramps too but I fear the day Texas may have to rebuild these as well. Actually I question if they will feasibly be able to in another 40ish years if the oil market isn't as hot as it currently is.

Sometimes I can't help but wonder what Atlanta would be like if we had more stacks and a more redundant freeway network with Stacks everywhere like seen in DFW or Houston but I actually find that despite by ranking Texas has the best infrastructure in the nation..Georgia's roads are actual not that bad. Infact I find them alot more refreshing given the hills, TREES, and how much better they conform to the terrain rather than completely aniahlating it. Also much more diverse interchanges instead of every single exit being to an access road. Also I think I like Georgia's choice of pavement (black and I believe granite)
As one who has spent most of his life in either Georgia or Texas, I agree with most of this. Texas cannot get by with asphalt roads however, at least in the DFW region. The expansive clay soils require steel reinforced concrete. Asphalt roads end up buckling with the soil.
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Old 01-16-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,645 posts, read 16,668,030 times
Reputation: 5072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
The word LESS as you have used it doesn't amount to a whole lot. It's still sweltering and humid and rough all over the south in the summer. The humidity is what makes things miserable. 90 degrees and 100% humidity is just as bad as 100+ but lower humidity.
100% humidity would be raining.
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Old 01-16-2019, 05:33 PM
bu2
 
9,213 posts, read 5,909,093 times
Reputation: 3669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
If I'm not mistaken I believe Spaghetti Junction's engineering was based off the stacks seen in California, probably not as overly engineered as those stacks are which have to withstand earthquakes (and occasionally still fail to). I'm not well versed in many of the stacks over in LA or San Francisco. Some of them seemed fairly new... fairly... others looked severely under planned and questionably interstate grade. Alot of California freeways are also state maintained routes so not sure if federal funding went into their designs. Actually some of their state routes would be impossible to distinguish from an actual interstate. Others seem very old and more like the parkways found in New England.

This is all opinion based but when it comes to Stacks I think Texas pretty much owns the book as just about every single freeway to freeway and sometimes even surface roads has a flyover that makes it seem like traffic is literally coming out of the sky. I happen to live near one currently for a toll road. They're pretty impressive stuff, they build them over access roads and braided ramps too but I fear the day Texas may have to rebuild these as well. Actually I question if they will feasibly be able to in another 40ish years if the oil market isn't as hot as it currently is.

Sometimes I can't help but wonder what Atlanta would be like if we had more stacks and a more redundant freeway network with Stacks everywhere like seen in DFW or Houston but I actually find that despite by ranking Texas has the best infrastructure in the nation..Georgia's roads are actual not that bad. Infact I find them alot more refreshing given the hills, TREES, and how much better they conform to the terrain rather than completely aniahlating it. Also much more diverse interchanges instead of every single exit being to an access road. Also I think I like Georgia's choice of pavement (black and I believe granite)
A number of the interchanges in Texas have been rebuilt in the last 20 years.
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Old 01-16-2019, 05:40 PM
bu2
 
9,213 posts, read 5,909,093 times
Reputation: 3669
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
100% humidity would be raining.
Or Houston on a July day about 3:00 pm
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:02 PM
 
1,245 posts, read 535,867 times
Reputation: 1042
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Or Houston on a July day about 3:00 pm
This...

I have no idea how people survived there before Air Conditioning. Its like breathing out of a hot mug full of boiling water.
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Old 01-16-2019, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,831 posts, read 2,060,228 times
Reputation: 2031
I have driven on every East-West interstate through Texas and have seen many of their stacks.

Texas has an outstanding DOT and loves to build roads and stacks.

There is growing worry that they don't factor in future maintenance costs however, and their situation is becoming one like unfunded future pension liabilities.

Texas is not very beautiful to me, and I think the lack of trees combined with so much concrete infrastructure is why.

The flyover stacks are now considered not the best use of limited tax-payer funding.

Today, spaghetti junction would cost at least $1 billion, and when there's enough room, these flyover-style interchanges are being replaced by cheaper turbine interchanges.


In a nutshell the expensive flyovers are replaced with larger radii loops closer to the ground resting on soil except immediately when going over opposite direction lanes.

Charlotte is home to one of the first turbine interchanges at I-85/I-485 (2nd interchange East of downtown). Georgia is building one in Savannah too.

California does have some new interchanges like on the I-110 between airport and downtown, but I'm thinking of so many old ones out in San Bernardino and Riverside Co. that were built during California's big road-building effort in mid 20th century.


When I lived in SoCal in the 90's California's highway exits including interstates didn't have a single exit number on any of them.


When finally forced to add them, they defied standards again by not "tab-mounting" them, and rather used whatever free space was available on the short/wide box truss supports.


The end result is the "California cool" factor was preserved despite the old & rickety condition of California's road infrastructure.


Thank God we have the beautiful style of Spaghetti junction and everything else designed in the 80's "freeing the freeways" initiative.


Because although the I-75 North recent project looks ok...


what GDOT pumps out these days like the new Capt. Herb Emory flyover from GA400 to I-85 North looks like a*s with its use of straight, precast beams to form a curve and its coat of paint to hide all the dirty details.
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Old 01-16-2019, 09:47 PM
 
1,245 posts, read 535,867 times
Reputation: 1042
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
I have driven on every East-West interstate through Texas and have seen many of their stacks.

Texas has an outstanding DOT and loves to build roads and stacks.

There is growing worry that they don't factor in future maintenance costs however, and their situation is becoming one like unfunded future pension liabilities.

Texas is not very beautiful to me, and I think the lack of trees combined with so much concrete infrastructure is why.

The flyover stacks are now considered not the best use of limited tax-payer funding.

Today, spaghetti junction would cost at least $1 billion, and when there's enough room, these flyover-style interchanges are being replaced by cheaper turbine interchanges.


In a nutshell the expensive flyovers are replaced with larger radii loops closer to the ground resting on soil except immediately when going over opposite direction lanes.

Charlotte is home to one of the first turbine interchanges at I-85/I-485 (2nd interchange East of downtown). Georgia is building one in Savannah too.

California does have some new interchanges like on the I-110 between airport and downtown, but I'm thinking of so many old ones out in San Bernardino and Riverside Co. that were built during California's big road-building effort in mid 20th century.


When I lived in SoCal in the 90's California's highway exits including interstates didn't have a single exit number on any of them.


When finally forced to add them, they defied standards again by not "tab-mounting" them, and rather used whatever free space was available on the short/wide box truss supports.


The end result is the "California cool" factor was preserved despite the old & rickety condition of California's road infrastructure.


Thank God we have the beautiful style of Spaghetti junction and everything else designed in the 80's "freeing the freeways" initiative.


Because although the I-75 North recent project looks ok...


what GDOT pumps out these days like the new Capt. Herb Emory flyover from GA400 to I-85 North looks like a*s with its use of straight, precast beams to form a curve and its coat of paint to hide all the dirty details.
Now that you mention this, I remember using I-485's western portion between I-77 and I-85 literally 2 days after it opened to traffic, purely by coincidence as I hadn't intended on it nor did I know it was finally complete but GPS routed me that way to bypass some inner-city traffic, but the northern interchange between I-85 and I-485 near Concorde is beautiful. I love that interchange.

Texas definitely has some state of the art highways though. The interchanges here are insane and sometimes it feels like they purposely biuld some of these stacks with the intent on intimidating drivers. Have you used I-35 between DFW and Austin? They pretty much re-made that road. It looks awesome... but its pretty hard keeping up with traffic, people on it are typically doing 85 MPH or higher.

Last edited by Need4Camaro; 01-16-2019 at 10:03 PM..
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Old 01-16-2019, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia
5,060 posts, read 4,102,297 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
I'm concerned about it all because the way the US politicizes infrastructure is scary. Our bridges, dams, pipes underground, etc., all need to be addressed.
You'd think that infrastructure would be a rare moment of bipartisanship. But no.
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Old Yesterday, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,645 posts, read 16,668,030 times
Reputation: 5072
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
I have driven on every East-West interstate through Texas and have seen many of their stacks.

Texas has an outstanding DOT and loves to build roads and stacks.

There is growing worry that they don't factor in future maintenance costs however, and their situation is becoming one like unfunded future pension liabilities.

Texas is not very beautiful to me, and I think the lack of trees combined with so much concrete infrastructure is why.

The flyover stacks are now considered not the best use of limited tax-payer funding.

Today, spaghetti junction would cost at least $1 billion, and when there's enough room, these flyover-style interchanges are being replaced by cheaper turbine interchanges.


In a nutshell the expensive flyovers are replaced with larger radii loops closer to the ground resting on soil except immediately when going over opposite direction lanes.

Charlotte is home to one of the first turbine interchanges at I-85/I-485 (2nd interchange East of downtown). Georgia is building one in Savannah too.

California does have some new interchanges like on the I-110 between airport and downtown, but I'm thinking of so many old ones out in San Bernardino and Riverside Co. that were built during California's big road-building effort in mid 20th century.


When I lived in SoCal in the 90's California's highway exits including interstates didn't have a single exit number on any of them.


When finally forced to add them, they defied standards again by not "tab-mounting" them, and rather used whatever free space was available on the short/wide box truss supports.


The end result is the "California cool" factor was preserved despite the old & rickety condition of California's road infrastructure.


Thank God we have the beautiful style of Spaghetti junction and everything else designed in the 80's "freeing the freeways" initiative.


Because although the I-75 North recent project looks ok...


what GDOT pumps out these days like the new Capt. Herb Emory flyover from GA400 to I-85 North looks like a*s with its use of straight, precast beams to form a curve and its coat of paint to hide all the dirty details.
ROW appears to the be the biggest challenge for Turbine Interchanges, would not work well in urban settings.
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