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Old 02-20-2019, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,888 posts, read 2,091,587 times
Reputation: 2070

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Your point is taken. I understand it's not that simple.

But still... the people who plan this stuff out are industrial engineers. They're proficient in types of math I've never even heard of. A lot of them make 6-figure salaries. They know how to send deliveries to Tupelo, Mississippi and still make sure the truck doesn't come back empty.

So if they can't figure out how to plan routes so trucks don't hit spaghetti junction at 8:30am or 5:30pm, perhaps they deserve all that lost productivity.
They are civil engineers and Georgia hasn’t ever had a DOT on par with most other states.

I’ll bet no one at GDOT has ever analyzed how important a role out logistics historically has been to Arlanta’s Economy and therefore proposed a highway network supporting that former industry juggernaut.

I say former because even though there are a lot of transfer stations and distribution points in the metro and geographically it is the best in the Southeast, when Atlanta and NJ are teucjer’a most hated areas to traverse, you can’t say logistics is a one of our strengths anymore.
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Old 02-20-2019, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,888 posts, read 2,091,587 times
Reputation: 2070
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
Your point is taken. I understand it's not that simple.

But still... the people who plan this stuff out are industrial engineers. They're proficient in types of math I've never even heard of. A lot of them make 6-figure salaries. They know how to send deliveries to Tupelo, Mississippi and still make sure the truck doesn't come back empty.

So if they can't figure out how to plan routes so trucks don't hit spaghetti junction at 8:30am or 5:30pm, perhaps they deserve all that lost productivity.
They are civil engineers and Georgia hasnít ever had a DOT on par with most other states.

Iíll bet no one at GDOT has ever analyzed how important a role out logistics historically has been to Arlantaís Economy and therefore proposed a highway network supporting that former industry juggernaut.

I say former because even though there are a lot of transfer stations and distribution points in the metro that geographically is the best in the Southeast, when Atlanta and NJ are truckerís 2 most hated areas to traverse, you canít say logistics is a one of our strengths anymore.
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Old 02-20-2019, 06:43 AM
 
8,032 posts, read 9,869,142 times
Reputation: 5970
You're talking about DOT. I'm talking about the supply chain professionals who work at the companies who plan truck routes and traffic. I'm sure some of the smaller ones just have some guy in dispatch who routes things without thinking about it.

But really good companies have highly skilled engineers who plan all this stuff out.

Maybe that explains which trucks you see. I mean, when you're stuck in rush hour at spaghetti junction, you never see a UPS or a Pepsi truck. Maybe that's because these companies ARE sophisticated enough to know how to plan around it. The ones you see are the ones who don't understand how to plan well.

I mean, we're talking about an industry where the bean counters figured out how to keep delivery trucks from ever having to make left turns because they take too long. Avoiding one of the worst bottlenecks in the country during peak times should be a no-brainer.
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:07 AM
 
Location: NW Atlanta
5,130 posts, read 3,628,178 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
They are civil engineers and Georgia hasnít ever had a DOT on par with most other states.

Iíll bet no one at GDOT has ever analyzed how important a role out logistics historically has been to Arlantaís Economy and therefore proposed a highway network supporting that former industry juggernaut.

I say former because even though there are a lot of transfer stations and distribution points in the metro that geographically is the best in the Southeast, when Atlanta and NJ are truckerís 2 most hated areas to traverse, you canít say logistics is a one of our strengths anymore.
Georgia Statewide Freight & Logistics Action Plan (GDOT)
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:06 AM
 
4,396 posts, read 4,271,070 times
Reputation: 3400
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
https://www.ajc.com/news/traffic/ame...LsiUoO8Po7MjK/

"It’s not the worst in the country anymore, but Spaghetti Junction still sits high on the national list of truck bottlenecks in Georgia.

The interchange at I-285 and I-85 (north) was dethroned by the intersection of I-95 and SR 4 in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in the American Transportation Research Institute’s annual ranking of top 100 truck bottlenecks....

Although Spaghetti Junction fell a spot in the ranking, two metro Atlanta locations rose. The intersection of I-75 and I-285 (north) rose a spot, from No. 4 last year to No. 3. And the area where I-20 intersects with I-285 (west) rose from No. 17 last year to crack the top 10, finishing No. 9 this year...."


I20 at 285E is #25. I20 at 75/85 is #54. I75 at I85 is #91.

As logistics is a major part of Atlanta's economy, this is a concern. So far as I know, Spaghetti Junction is the only one of these 6 where any improvements are planned. By contrast, Houston, for example, has #5, #13 and #24 near downtown Houston. All are part of a massive rebuilding project that has been under planning for about a decade and has already started to some extent.

Again, an outer belt, linking 85N with 85S and 75N with 75S would improve these situtations. The much maligned "northern arc" would do less than a western and eastern to relieve these problems.
We been over this a thousand times and keep running into same issues not being addressed

1. You suggestion a second by pass much futher out than most metros

2. Who homes and business are you volunteering to be razed for this YOU NEVER ANSWER THIS. You always come back to tell what Houston does, but that Houston folks, You make it sound so simple for other people to give of their neighborhood. If the goverment came to you about your neighborhood and the neighborhood you grew up in being razed for a freeway would you support? it's not that simple.


I mention this before the only way for Atlanta to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neigborhoods being razed, is build elevated freeways, or tunnels. Some corridors or even the perimeter could be decked, it could be a toll roadway. But the boldness for such ideals doesn't exist.
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:08 AM
 
Location: NW Atlanta
5,130 posts, read 3,628,178 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post


I mention this before the only way for Atlanta to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neigborhoods being razed, is build elevated freeways, or tunnels. Some corridors or even the perimeter could be decked, it could be a toll roadway. But the boldness for such ideals doesn't exist.
GDOT is already planning elevated tollways along I-285 and GA 400 (similar to the NW Corridor), and even those are getting residents along those corridors riled up.
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:15 AM
 
4,396 posts, read 4,271,070 times
Reputation: 3400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulch View Post
GDOT is already planning elevated tollways along I-285 and GA 400 (similar to the NW Corridor), and even those are getting residents along those corridors riled up.
That's why I said "to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neighborhoods being razed" because construction will effect the areas, but it's minimal in comparison to making freeways wider or razing neighborhoods to make new paths altogether.
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Old 02-20-2019, 09:16 AM
 
28,642 posts, read 25,430,791 times
Reputation: 9889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
Without trucks transporting those goods and materials at all hours of the day, our economy basically does not function at any level, much less a high level. Trucks are the very backbone of the prosperous economy that we enjoy in modern times.
Truth, B2R. It does look kind of bad for us to have 3 of the worst truck bottlenecks.

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Old 02-20-2019, 09:19 AM
 
28,642 posts, read 25,430,791 times
Reputation: 9889
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
We been over this a thousand times and keep running into same issues not being addressed

1. You suggestion a second by pass much futher out than most metros

2. Who homes and business are you volunteering to be razed for this YOU NEVER ANSWER THIS. You always come back to tell what Houston does, but that Houston folks, You make it sound so simple for other people to give of their neighborhood. If the goverment came to you about your neighborhood and the neighborhood you grew up in being razed for a freeway would you support? it's not that simple.


I mention this before the only way for Atlanta to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neigborhoods being razed, is build elevated freeways, or tunnels. Some corridors or even the perimeter could be decked, it could be a toll roadway. But the boldness for such ideals doesn't exist.
I'm a huge advocate for the neighborhoods. However, many areas in the ATL have had to endure having a freeway rammed through their heart, and most have managed to bounce back.
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Old 02-20-2019, 09:43 AM
 
4,185 posts, read 3,866,251 times
Reputation: 3238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulch View Post
GDOT is already planning elevated tollways along I-285 and GA 400 (similar to the NW Corridor), and even those are getting residents along those corridors riled up.

This has been he story of just about any plan to make improvements in metro Atlanta from transit to roads for the past few decades. People gets upset and complains it will affect them, then turn around and complain about how the traffic and gridlock affects them after plans for the improvements were scrapped.


Outer Perimeter was voted down and the area was built up on, and now the metro area suffers, even though the solution was turned down.


Marta Red line expansion has been discussed and researched, almost to planning stages on where it would go, only to be scrapped for a soon to be bus line. By 2025 people on 400 will be complaining constantly about, we really wish Marta built the red line out to Windward, as 400 traffic continue to get worse as more people move north. Gwinnett rejecting MARTA and the current outcome is a thread to itself.


Trucks will continue to overturn at these interchanges and we will just have to live with it, until they are rebuild or the Perimeter is double decked.
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