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Old 02-20-2019, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek area
9,807 posts, read 8,967,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
But really good companies have highly skilled engineers who plan all this stuff out.
Back in the day, a fraternity brother of mine - a math major - was hired by UPS on graduation to design mathematical models that would allow UPS to most efficiently plan its delivery routes. As I recall, it was a rather high paying position for 1985.
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:30 PM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
We been over this a thousand times and keep running into same issues not being addressed

1. You suggestion a second by pass much futher out than most metros

2. Who homes and business are you volunteering to be razed for this YOU NEVER ANSWER THIS. You always come back to tell what Houston does, but that Houston folks, You make it sound so simple for other people to give of their neighborhood. If the goverment came to you about your neighborhood and the neighborhood you grew up in being razed for a freeway would you support? it's not that simple.


I mention this before the only way for Atlanta to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neigborhoods being razed, is build elevated freeways, or tunnels. Some corridors or even the perimeter could be decked, it could be a toll roadway. But the boldness for such ideals doesn't exist.
And several of you fail to acknowledge that condemnation happens all over the country. All these Marta projects require condemnations. Y’all act like it is something unusual. New York and New Jersey have used it for things like private casino parking lots
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:33 PM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
That's why I said "to minimize at least some of the damage from mass neighborhoods being razed" because construction will effect the areas, but it's minimal in comparison to making freeways wider or razing neighborhoods to make new paths altogether.
I remember a neighborhood in Houston that fought high sound walls because they were ugly. Sounds like aircraft going overhead now. Elevated structures can sometimes be a lot more disruptive than wider footprints
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:43 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 582,408 times
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I tend to agree that metro Atlanta seems to overestimate the power of public opposition in terms of fighting for the greater good of the public. I mean no offense by this but comparatively speaking, Places like Chicago, New York and Boston are ruthless in these arenas where as if you were holding up an agenda of theirs they would literally be there with a bulldozer and your check and an officer ready to escort you off the premises. Look at what happened to Meigs Field Airport in Chicago. There was no warning whatsoever to the occupants there. They seized it and bulldozed the runway while there were still aircraft parked, landing and taking off.

Now I'm not saying that we should be so ruthless no. But... at the same time I dont really see anything that happened here to be dramatically different than any other metro.

At this point though the idea of building more super highways within the immediate metro is also a fantasy..its extremely unlikely to happen unless it happens out west or south.

With that stated I believe the solution is extensive transit and more importantly, encouraging folks to use it. That and also theoretically... Thru Lanes for the major interstates allowing inter-regional traffic to pass through the metro with no exits or very limited exits within the metro as to bypass Atlanta without building a whole new route.
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Old 02-20-2019, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,877 posts, read 16,873,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
I tend to agree that metro Atlanta seems to overestimate the power of public opposition in terms of fighting for the greater good of the public. I mean no offense by this but comparatively speaking, Places like Chicago, New York and Boston are ruthless in these arenas where as if you were holding up an agenda of theirs they would literally be there with a bulldozer and your check and an officer ready to escort you off the premises. Look at what happened to Meigs Field Airport in Chicago. There was no warning whatsoever to the occupants there. They seized it and bulldozed the runway while there were still aircraft parked, landing and taking off.

Now I'm not saying that we should be so ruthless no. But... at the same time I dont really see anything that happened here to be dramatically different than any other metro.

At this point though the idea of building more super highways within the immediate metro is also a fantasy..its extremely unlikely to happen unless it happens out west or south.

With that stated I believe the solution is extensive transit and more importantly, encouraging folks to use it. That and also theoretically... Thru Lanes for the major interstates allowing inter-regional traffic to pass through the metro with no exits or very limited exits within the metro as to bypass Atlanta without building a whole new route.
Atlanta is the cradle of Civil Rights movement
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:01 PM
 
5,918 posts, read 5,229,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Truth, B2R. It does look kind of bad for us to have 3 of the worst truck bottlenecks.

I agree that it is not a good look for Atlanta to have 3 of the 10 (and 6 of the 100) worst truck bottlenecks in the country, to which I say "Welcome to the big leagues, Atlanta."

Atlanta may have more entries than anyone else in the Top-10 with 3 bottlenecks.

Though what is interesting is that Houston (a city/metro with 3 outer loops) had more entries (9 bottlenecks) than anyone else on the entire list of 100, as noted in the article linked to at the start of this thread...

Quote:
The only city to have more freight bottlenecks than Atlanta was Houston, which had nine.
3 of America’s 10 worst truck bottlenecks are in metro Atlanta (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Other large major metro areas also had multiple entries on the entire list of 100, including Greater Los Angeles (which had 2 entries in the Top-10 and at least about 5 overall despite having a much more extensive regional freeway system than Atlanta), and Greater Chicago (which had 2 entries in the Top-11 and at least about 5 overall, despite also arguably having a noticeably more extensive regional expressway system than Atlanta).

In Atlanta's particular case of having 3 freight bottlenecks in the Top-10 and 6 on the entire list of 100... It should not be surprising that Atlanta has so many freight bottlenecks, given that Atlanta is a major (massive) logistical hub, nexus point and crossroads for the entire southeastern North American continent with a fast-growing population and fast-growing economy at a central location... All factors that combine to generate an extreme amount of truck traffic.

Atlanta's status as a large major metro with a large population and a large economy at a central logistical location is going to generate a massive (extreme) amount of truck traffic... And Atlanta's politically, socially and culturally constrained road network admittedly does not help the situation.
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:17 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 582,408 times
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Chicago is unsurprising given it has a significantly larger population and Chicago in general is just not someplace you want to drive through.

Houston is a city I avoid if / when possible.
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:29 PM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Chicago is unsurprising given it has a significantly larger population and Chicago in general is just not someplace you want to drive through.

Houston is a city I avoid if / when possible.
Chicago and Atlanta are major logistical hubs. Having these delays hampers them. Both are in key centrally located geographical locations as well as being major rail hubs. Many of these Atlanta jobs could move to Birmingham or Charlotte or Nashville (although Tennessee is probably behind Georgia in dealing with traffic).
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Old 02-20-2019, 09:04 PM
 
5,918 posts, read 5,229,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Chicago and Atlanta are major logistical hubs. Having these delays hampers them. Both are in key centrally located geographical locations as well as being major rail hubs. Many of these Atlanta jobs could move to Birmingham or Charlotte or Nashville (although Tennessee is probably behind Georgia in dealing with traffic).
I don't know about Birmingham taking too many jobs from Atlanta, just simply because Birmingham has a tiny airport by comparison (fewer than 3 million passengers at B'ham Airport compared to over 107 million passengers at ATL Airport in 2018), and because Birmingham continues to experience some degree of regional infighting and appears to continue to suffer from a noticeable comparative lack of support from the Alabama state government when it comes to recruiting business relocations and courting business investment.

Although, I guess that one could say that there have been some recent demonstrations that Southeastern competitors like Charlotte and Nashville seem to be capable of taking jobs and economic activity and opportunities from Atlanta, with Amazon awarding a 5,000-job regional operations center to Nashville back in November, and with the news of yet another Atlanta major bank corporate headquarters (SunTrust Bank) relocating to Charlotte a few weeks ago.
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Old 02-21-2019, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
22,877 posts, read 16,873,592 times
Reputation: 5178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
I agree that it is not a good look for Atlanta to have 3 of the 10 (and 6 of the 100) worst truck bottlenecks in the country, to which I say "Welcome to the big leagues, Atlanta."

Atlanta may have more entries than anyone else in the Top-10 with 3 bottlenecks.

Though what is interesting is that Houston (a city/metro with 3 outer loops) had more entries (9 bottlenecks) than anyone else on the entire list of 100, as noted in the article linked to at the start of this thread...


3 of America’s 10 worst truck bottlenecks are in metro Atlanta (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Other large major metro areas also had multiple entries on the entire list of 100, including Greater Los Angeles (which had 2 entries in the Top-10 and at least about 5 overall despite having a much more extensive regional freeway system than Atlanta), and Greater Chicago (which had 2 entries in the Top-11 and at least about 5 overall, despite also arguably having a noticeably more extensive regional expressway system than Atlanta).

In Atlanta's particular case of having 3 freight bottlenecks in the Top-10 and 6 on the entire list of 100... It should not be surprising that Atlanta has so many freight bottlenecks, given that Atlanta is a major (massive) logistical hub, nexus point and crossroads for the entire southeastern North American continent with a fast-growing population and fast-growing economy at a central location... All factors that combine to generate an extreme amount of truck traffic.

Atlanta's status as a large major metro with a large population and a large economy at a central logistical location is going to generate a massive (extreme) amount of truck traffic... And Atlanta's politically, socially and culturally constrained road network admittedly does not help the situation.
But bypass loops remove trucks from inner freeways
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