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Old 04-03-2007, 08:05 PM
 
2 posts, read 7,614 times
Reputation: 11

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I found the mention of section 8 housing interesting. That's a term that neither my husband, nor I, or any of our neighbors have heard before, but it's been used recently by one of the builders of our community here in Canton. I'm glad a definition of the term was posted after your post. There are three homes in this "single family home" community that house more than one family. I'm talking about the multiple families that need to call the sheriffs department out in order to resolve civil disputes on a regular basis. We were under the impression that we were buying a home in a neighborhood, not an odd house in an apartment complex. I'm not clear on how this is legal.

At any rate, that's enough of my rant. For those of you looking at Legacy beware, as they will not protect your investment.
My husband and I both love the Rosewood. It really is a large house, but it’s an easy floorplan to call home once you’ve settled in.
Some of the problems we encountered: The drywall throughout the house has more nail pops and tape tearing than I can count. There are chips, cracks, and enamel is warn away on all of the tubs, showers, and sinks. We’ve found a leak in just about every bathroom, and I’m talking about the ones that you find when you notice the water dripping from the ceiling on the floor below. All of the cabinets have some sort of film that looks like glue all over them. It takes some elbow Greece to get that out. Every linoleum surface is covered in glue splatters. The floorboards are coming up on the second story in several places. We don’t know yet what’s wrong with the wiring in the house. All of the appliances supplied by Legacy’s vender Cowan and Cowan are second hand or refurbished appliances. And last week while reinforcing an electrical box in my attic that was only attached to the ceiling by one nail I happened upon a large plastic bucket full of what once was urine, and feces (now emaciated in my attic). I can only assume that the workers left it up there for us to find later on.

All new homes have their kinks, and problems. We knew this, and we were willing to deal with this, but when we find that the warranty is virtually nonexistent it makes all of those "new house" problems so much larger. We've had our air conditioners replaced three times now. Did I mention we've only been in the house for one year? All three times were due to the fact that the last guy didn't install the compressor correctly. The most difficult thing was to try and get them to come out and look at the units each time we noticed they weren't working. We were told that "people in Georgia have been without air conditioning for over 20 years" twice by two different customer service reps at Legacy corporate. We were hung up on, and told that we’re just too far away by Deerman; the company who was hired to provide maintenance and service to the A/C units in this subdivision.

After a year, a much more watchful eye, a much more developed sense of humor, and no idea what might come next I can conclude that while the Rosewood is a lovely floorplan; no one in their right mind should willingly allow Legacy Communities into any part of their life, let alone an investment as important as their home.
If I had it to do all over again, I’d have purchased a smaller home for the same price.
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Old 04-04-2007, 08:33 PM
 
26 posts, read 169,272 times
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Sorry to hear about all of your problems new to Canton. I am finding alot of people that have very simalar problems with Legacy. I see a few responses from people in this forum, but people who live in the communities are saying the same thing. Live big for less is true, and there is always a reason why you can get big for less. I wish you good luck, maybe you should try to sell before the community gets old and harder to sell your property.
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Old 04-07-2007, 07:29 AM
 
37 posts, read 160,500 times
Reputation: 24
Default Rosewood Problems

New2Canton,

Thanks for the post and the warnings. I'd like to know if you hired an inspector before purchasing your home. If so, are any of the problems you mentioned something he should or could have identified. I have hired an inspector and want to ensure that he finds/identifies these sort of problems before I sign my contract. I guess my follow up question would be, if you had an inspector, how does he fit in the equation in rectifying your problems.

All others:

Until recently, I really did not know how beautiful the Rosewood really was. But thanks to Khris (dedicated poster) and a few others who emailed me photos, I now know the size and beauty of this house. In fact, I now have photos of the Rosewood, Newport, and Waverly. All are amazingly beautiful and each has its pros and cons. If someone would like the photos, send me an email at Removed. I'll send what I have. I delete all JUNK mail, so please use this forum to let me know you want the photos. New2Canton is not the first to post some of the problems with Legacy. Again, each post is greatly appreciated. I thought about leaving Legacy alone and buying a KB Home. KB however, has several websites dedicated to the mountain of problems it is currently having. I've come to the conclusion that KB Homes, McCar Homes, Legacy and other builders in Atlanta are doing every thing they can to move their inventory, including taking shortcuts. We have about three options: spend northern VA/CA/NY prices for homes (which also have problems, just not as easy to identify), rent (which pays someone else's mortgage) or you do the best job you can in ensuring the builders build your home to standards. If it is not to standard, do not buy the house. WALK AWAY. If during the walk through you identify (or your independent inspector identifies) a problem, make the builder fix it. If not, WALK AWAY.
This is not minimize the pain and agony that others are going through, they are definately in my prayers. As most of you have read, I'm in the process of purchasing a Rosewood. If during this process things don't go as I feel they should, I will WALK AWAY. I don't live in GA, but from what I've been told, there are thousands of houses just waiting for a buyer. I will find a home for my family. The question is not whether it will be to my liking, because it will. It's which builder/seller is willing to sell a home to my liking. I'm patient enough to wait. If Legacy is not the home, Brayson here I come.

Last edited by xxman777; 04-09-2007 at 08:44 PM.. Reason: Removed Personal Info
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Old 04-07-2007, 04:49 PM
 
3,966 posts, read 10,814,719 times
Reputation: 1428
I am curious, why do you have to have a newly built home? Just wonderng, I live in a part of Metro ATlanta where there weren't new homes until a couple of years ago and those that are being built run close to a million dollar or so, so most who want the convience of our location, have to buy an older home.

One of the biggest risks in buying a new home, is if the builder walks away and/or sales the land to a lower price builder thus bringing down the entire community's property values
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Old 04-07-2007, 09:21 PM
 
37 posts, read 160,500 times
Reputation: 24
Default Buying Old

lastminutemom,

You bring up an interesting point. Buying an older home can bring less risk. At the very least, you accept that there will be acceptable risk. My wife wants new, I want very old. I'm talking 100-150 years old. I wanted to buy a 100 year old house and then renovate it. My wife wanted no part of that idea. My take is that the structure is stable, purchase can be reasonable, and renovations to modern specs can prove to be cost effective. Again, I lost that battle. Her side of the story..."I'd rather live out of the city, than in it. That way I can take advantage of everything the city has to offer, and leave it behind at will."
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Old 04-08-2007, 09:19 AM
 
37 posts, read 160,500 times
Reputation: 24
Default Photos of the Rosewood

Pearl,

I sent you about three emails with photos of the Rosewood. I also sent a link that have photos of the Rosewood, Newport, and some other models. Hope this helps. Here's another link for you to review. The first 3 or 4 photos are of the Rosewood. The 5th is of the Waverly. The Rosewood picks up again after the Elevation B/C photo.

http://www.kodakgallery.com/Slidesho...e&conn_speed=1

For Newport/Rosewood and Other Models, Click Below.

Moderator cut: commercial real estate sales site
Skip
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:21 AM
 
3,966 posts, read 10,814,719 times
Reputation: 1428
I hope that your wife will take advantage of all that is offered in the City of aTlanta. I find that most people who live far out, really don't, except for an occasional trip in or driving through town to the airport, most could be living in a suburb anywhere. I think people are sometimes surprised about that -- but traffic is a bear here and can be a real barrier to pariticipating in activities. Try making it in from Canton or Cartersville or Newnan for a Friday night baseball game or play at the Fox. Even from Dunwoody, it takes hair off your chest. (Saturdays and Sundays are better though one wreck or construction or multiple events and you are a goner.)

I understand the appeal of a new home, the pull is very strong. Just be careful.
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Old 04-08-2007, 11:28 AM
 
3 posts, read 10,282 times
Reputation: 10
Default I've been reading along

and watching this thread to see where it was going. I wanted to post earlier, but decided it would be better to be onlooker and let some issues evolve. Legacy like KB, Centex, Ryland, Bowen...are going to have complaints. They build thousands of units yearly in several different markets. It would be highly unlikely that they would not have any complaints. I'll tell you what, I'd bet if you took the number of complaints and divided it by the number of units built, I would be that the percentage would be extremely low. I guarantee you Emory hospital gets hundreds of complaints, but yet it's still revered as one of the best hospitals in the southeast. Legacy has a wonderful subdivision in Braselton called Chateu Elan. An awesome golf course and an exclusive neighborhood. I'm personally not a fan of new construction, but I know many who live in this multi-million dollar neighborhood and I have yet to hear a complaint.

Here are some pointers that I would give to all who read this and are looking for a "new construction" home.

1. Do not buy a home until it is built, unless you are present during the construction process or have hired a custom builder.

2. Have a representative involved in the process; a lawyer, Realtor, General Contractor, whoever you feel is knowledgeable and will protect your interest.

3. Visit some sites. Go and see the houses they are building in other areas other than your own.

4. Be picky and ask thousands of questions. Is this common or select, why do you use these products, what if we moved this wall, how long do you let the concrete cure before you begin framing, how many units have you presold, show me... I mean come on your paying for your new home and this is a 30 year commitment.

Like I said before I am not a fan of new construction by any of those builders, or any builders that builds in bulk. Track building leads to mistakes and cover ups. The only thing I can say good about new, is just that it's new, it will appreciate, and it's new. I like the historic home idea. Grant Park, where I live, is indicative of that. Character, eloquence, value, uniqueness, structural integrity, value, appreciation, and many more great features. Well I hope this helps.
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Old 04-09-2007, 04:34 PM
 
12 posts, read 60,474 times
Reputation: 12
Default Legacy Communities

Dear jtmony:

Much of what you said makes sense. Legacy Communities estimate my closing to be sometime next week. During my walk, I am going to take my father whose into construction to help me identify areas on the surface that i is dissatisying, but as you mentioned it is impossible to know what lay beneath the surface. If I do not like what i see, I am going to walk away. You are right! It is better to loose the 2000 earnest money than to repay a loan for something that you are not satisfied with.

You mentioned McCar home.. are they a builder in GA?

Thank you very much for your comments.

Kind regards,
figueroa


Quote:
Originally Posted by jtmony View Post
Khris,

Thanks again for the replies. I again agree with your assessments. I prefer the garage exit/enter into the hallway, and not the Family Room. Entering into the FR seems wrong on so many different levels. Tracking mud into the FR is only one concern I have. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I was told that the rooms that share a bathroom were about 12x12. That is small compared to the master suite, but not so small for a kid, teen or guest. Would you estimate that the rooms are at least 12x12? If not, what would you guest their measurements are? I also don't like the stairs, but that's a long-term project I've planned out. Again, thanks.

Firgueroa,
No promblem on the response. I'm just glad I could help. When I first started searching for information about ATL and houses, there were many negative comments. Some like, "don't move here," "stay away from Clayton County,"
"don't buy a McCar home," and "Legacy was the worst experience ever." I don't dispute any of the opinions. In fact, that's exactly what this forum is about. However, some posters fail to provide evidence. For example, Armetha (I believe that's his User Name) gave great examples of what he was experiencing. He also said that based on his experience, he could not recommend a Legacy home. In his post, he mentioned that the builders had been replaced and things were better than when his house was built. Those are all great things to read when considering a home. That's not to say that only Legacy make mistakes, or that they are the only builders who will leave trash in your dry walls and/other areas. My first home was a Richmond American in Northern VA. It was a beautiful home. When I went to upgrade the carpet, I found trash, broken pieces of dry wall and other items in the floor registers. I found other errors under the surface of the house too. My point is, we as home owners/buyers, only get a chance to see the surface. We depend of boards like this to help us get two and three layers deeper. McCar builds wonderful homes, as do Legacy minus the amenities. Can builders be bad, yes. If you go to your final walk through and things are not to your standard, don't sign the closing documents. We're in a buyer's market. We have the power. Do you risk losing your ernest money, yes, but that is better than losing $200-$300K. They're losing $200 -$300k, you're losing $1000 plus years of regret. As I understand it, ATL has a lot of homes just waiting on the right buyer.
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:46 PM
 
93 posts, read 360,082 times
Reputation: 24
Dear jtmony:

Much of what you said makes sense. Legacy Communities estimate my closing to be sometime next week. During my walk, I am going to take my father whose into construction to help me identify areas on the surface that i is dissatisying, but as you mentioned it is impossible to know what lay beneath the surface. If I do not like what i see, I am going to walk away. You are right! It is better to loose the 2000 earnest money than to repay a loan for something that you are not satisfied with.

You mentioned McCar home.. are they a builder in GA?

Thank you very much for your comments.

Kind regards,
figueroa


I hope you don't mind my answering this...yes...they build in 4 states: GA, NC, SC, & FL.
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