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Old 05-20-2019, 09:50 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 1,650,881 times
Reputation: 2663

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PKCorey View Post


You are so dramatic .

So you want the police to do a half ass job of investigating a serious accident or fatal crash because you don't want to wait in traffic backup?

Either way, GDOT pays extra to clear a scene quickly. Even if the road is reopened, the reduced lanes still cause delays so its not that much of a help.

Tell the idiots like the ones that I saw on I-85 on Saturday who blocked the lane and caused a back up instead of driving over to the shoulder and waiting for GSP or Gwinnett County Police.

This confuses me though. I'm always hearing drivers should stay put so that the officers can visualize how the accident occurred to see who is at fault but then I also hear vehicles should move to the shoulder. My worst fear is if I should move my car so as not to block traffic and then the officer gives me a ticket for leaving the scene (and yes I do believe cops would do a bi**h move like this even though I wouldn't be far from the scene).

 
Old 05-20-2019, 10:00 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
4,441 posts, read 6,201,154 times
Reputation: 1983
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
This confuses me though. I'm always hearing drivers should stay put so that the officers can visualize how the accident occurred to see who is at fault but then I also hear vehicles should move to the shoulder. My worst fear is if I should move my car so as not to block traffic and then the officer gives me a ticket for leaving the scene (and yes I do believe cops would do a bi**h move like this even though I wouldn't be far from the scene).
The law says move the cars. It doesn't matter because the cops go off your statements then account for the damage to your cars.

You aren't leaving the scene, if you are still at the accident site. Now, if you ride to the house...

Quote:
I still stand by what I said but will add that I didn't mean leading up to the construction as drivers need to be forewarned so that they can start getting into other lanes before the three lanes are shut down. What I have a problem with is after you pass the construction having that length of road shut down when only a tiny fraction of it is being worked on. That's unnecessary.
I'll have to look for it again but it is a legitimate reason that they extend the zone. I think, I read about when they were discussing the construction zone on I-20 in Carroll and Douglas County with all the deaths and crashes during the current construction project. You are suppose to setup a zone in the beginning and end to alleviate the pressure during the work zone to protect workers on both sides hence why you see the cop cars lights so far before the construction, during and after construction zone.

It's a method to the madness, I suppose.
 
Old 05-20-2019, 10:14 PM
 
446 posts, read 223,647 times
Reputation: 622
Quote from the article:

"We spell this all out to say that bad traffic happens with very little rhyme or reason."

I disagree. The whole time I was reading the article I was wondering why all these wrecks happened. What happened that a car just flipped on 400? How did the two 18-wheelers collide on 75? They weren't going towards each other, so how did they manage to collide AND crush a car between them?

Is there just not enough police/trooper presence on the roads to (hopefully) make people stay within the speed limit? Could more preventing policing make for any less police closure after the fact? I don't know; I'm not a traffic engineer, nor am I a psychologist. But there HAD to be a reason why a car just flipped (out of control?) on 400, and why two trucks going in the same direction collided, and what on earth made the driver of the car get between them if they were driving at all erratically?
 
Old 05-20-2019, 10:39 PM
 
3,231 posts, read 1,281,996 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia Calico View Post
Quote from the article:

"We spell this all out to say that bad traffic happens with very little rhyme or reason."

I disagree. The whole time I was reading the article I was wondering why all these wrecks happened. What happened that a car just flipped on 400? How did the two 18-wheelers collide on 75? They weren't going towards each other, so how did they manage to collide AND crush a car between them?

Is there just not enough police/trooper presence on the roads to (hopefully) make people stay within the speed limit? Could more preventing policing make for any less police closure after the fact? I don't know; I'm not a traffic engineer, nor am I a psychologist. But there HAD to be a reason why a car just flipped (out of control?) on 400, and why two trucks going in the same direction collided, and what on earth made the driver of the car get between them if they were driving at all erratically?
For trucks, cars take them for granted way too easily and that is a BIG problem. They don't respect them and what they are capable of. Now I'm not saying this is what caused the accident, however; my imagination leads me to believe there was a tractor trailer in the left lane (which he should not have been there), car in the center lane, and tractor trailer in the right lane. -- Car in the center lane wasn't paying attention, maybe messing with his phone, stereo, or plainly just paced the trucks (very stupid thing to do, NEVER ride beside a tractor trailer, either pass him or stay behind him.). One of the truck drivers was either inattentive, looking up directions, or was plainly tired (and all too easily people forget, tractor trailers around the metro have been driving several more hours than themselves in that particular day and while your motives and goals are just around Atlanta, for them Atlanta is just one additional city they have to pass through. They get fatigued)...weeved into the left lanes, squishing the car who was pacing the trucks and smashed into eachother.

Whenever I come up to a tractor trailer...ALWAYS assume he is very tired, they have stringent laws about how far / long they can drive but as an adverse affect it puts alot of stain / pressure on the driver who is trying to make a delivery on time. NEVER...EVER...ride beside them, don't care what the speed limit is, you either stay behind or you pass him QUICKLY. It doesn't take much for one of them to completely massacre your life.... and lastly, ignore those stupid billboards on the highway with a lawyer practically promoting you to tie up with a truck, your LAWYER may get the settlement...but thats only if YOU survive.

Finally, as with anyone on the highway, always assume other drivers around you are completely irrational and clueless, predict and react.

Last edited by Need4Camaro; 05-20-2019 at 10:48 PM..
 
Old 05-20-2019, 11:21 PM
 
63 posts, read 16,408 times
Reputation: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
Did it? Now instead of a single, contained highway which can be blocked by sound walls which can be made decorative, those neighborhoods are drowning in traffic. Not having the highway didn't make the traffic not come, it just left it in everyone's front yards (literally) instead of putting it on a highway.
If the original Atlanta highway plan had been built, there would be a freeway where my house and every other house on my street is right now. Huge parts of the eastside neighborhoods that are the hottest in the city would be dead zones. It is a bizarre little fantasy to suggest that the highway planners had the right idea.
 
Old 05-20-2019, 11:22 PM
 
6,361 posts, read 5,832,880 times
Reputation: 4411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia Calico View Post
Quote from the article:

"We spell this all out to say that bad traffic happens with very little rhyme or reason."

I disagree. The whole time I was reading the article I was wondering why all these wrecks happened. What happened that a car just flipped on 400? How did the two 18-wheelers collide on 75? They weren't going towards each other, so how did they manage to collide AND crush a car between them?

Is there just not enough police/trooper presence on the roads to (hopefully) make people stay within the speed limit? Could more preventing policing make for any less police closure after the fact? I don't know; I'm not a traffic engineer, nor am I a psychologist. But there HAD to be a reason why a car just flipped (out of control?) on 400, and why two trucks going in the same direction collided, and what on earth made the driver of the car get between them if they were driving at all erratically?
These are all excellent questions, especially the questions asking if more police presence on the roads could make people drive closer to the speed limit and prevent the collisions that cause the police to have to close down the roads after the fact.

To at least partially answer your question, an increased and more visible police presence on the roads has been shown to cause motorists to drive more safely. The problem is that there is a general acute shortage of police personnel, not just in the Atlanta metropolitan area, but throughout much (if not most) of the country in both heavily populated metro areas and in sparsely populated rural areas alike.

Policing/law enforcement is a very stressful profession in which there seems to be a never-ending high rate of turnover and attrition... Something which (along with a high crime rate in many areas, both rural and urban; a stubborn refusal by government leaders to adequately compensate law enforcement personnel, and rising anti-government and anti-police sentiment in society making the law enforcement appear less attractive to many people) means that resources for traffic enforcement are often severely strained at every level.

On the seemingly rare occasions that there is less crime activity and that local and state law enforcement agencies may have enough manpower available, police agencies will put forth a 'show of force' to attempt to motivate motorists to drive safer... But incidents of crime, lack of available manpower, and serious (and sometimes fatal) multi-vehicle collisions can pull away whatever manpower might have been available for increased traffic enforcement in many jurisdictions.

On top of that, the instances of distraction and fatigue (leading to driver error) by motorists that Need4Camaro described play a leading role in causing the types of multiple serious collisions that tied up traffic in metro on Thursday and Friday of last week and that frequently tie up traffic in Atlanta and in other large major metro areas across the nation and around the world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
For trucks, cars take them for granted way too easily and that is a BIG problem. They don't respect them and what they are capable of. Now I'm not saying this is what caused the accident, however; my imagination leads me to believe there was a tractor trailer in the left lane (which he should not have been there), car in the center lane, and tractor trailer in the right lane. -- Car in the center lane wasn't paying attention, maybe messing with his phone, stereo, or plainly just paced the trucks (very stupid thing to do, NEVER ride beside a tractor trailer, either pass him or stay behind him.). One of the truck drivers was either inattentive, looking up directions, or was plainly tired (and all too easily people forget, tractor trailers around the metro have been driving several more hours than themselves in that particular day and while your motives and goals are just around Atlanta, for them Atlanta is just one additional city they have to pass through. They get fatigued)...weeved into the left lanes, squishing the car who was pacing the trucks and smashed into eachother.

Whenever I come up to a tractor trailer...ALWAYS assume he is very tired, they have stringent laws about how far / long they can drive but as an adverse affect it puts alot of stain / pressure on the driver who is trying to make a delivery on time. NEVER...EVER...ride beside them, don't care what the speed limit is, you either stay behind or you pass him QUICKLY. It doesn't take much for one of them to completely massacre your life.... and lastly, ignore those stupid billboards on the highway with a lawyer practically promoting you to tie up with a truck, you may get the settlement...but thats only if you survive.

Finally, as with anyone on the highway, always assume other drivers around you are completely irrational and clueless, predict and react.
… These are excellent comments and this is excellent advice about how motorists should drive when around trucks.
 
Old 05-20-2019, 11:30 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
4,441 posts, read 6,201,154 times
Reputation: 1983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia Calico View Post
Quote from the article:

"We spell this all out to say that bad traffic happens with very little rhyme or reason."

I disagree. The whole time I was reading the article I was wondering why all these wrecks happened. What happened that a car just flipped on 400? How did the two 18-wheelers collide on 75? They weren't going towards each other, so how did they manage to collide AND crush a car between them?

Is there just not enough police/trooper presence on the roads to (hopefully) make people stay within the speed limit? Could more preventing policing make for any less police closure after the fact? I don't know; I'm not a traffic engineer, nor am I a psychologist. But there HAD to be a reason why a car just flipped (out of control?) on 400, and why two trucks going in the same direction collided, and what on earth made the driver of the car get between them if they were driving at all erratically?
From the video, it seems traffic was stopped (truck 1)...the Chevy with a trailer came up behind and started slowing down for the first truck. Truck 2 came in flying at full speed and hit pickup/trailer and the first truck.

https://www.ajc.com/news/crime--law/...EIjJONDayTiwK/

I wouldn't be surprised, if the driver was on drugs or distracted driving. Just another reason why trucks should have mandated automatic emergency braking.
 
Old 05-21-2019, 12:39 AM
 
6,361 posts, read 5,832,880 times
Reputation: 4411
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
It's 3 reasons:

1. All of the tractor trailers from the explosive growth of distribution centers in McDonough, yet without any corresponding improvements to the road infrastructure to accommodate such heavy freight traffic.

2. I-75 is a major north-south tourist route for folks going to/from places like Florida and Michigan, and all of the major cities along it (Detroit, Cincinnati, Atlanta, Jacksonville, Miami). I-85 doesn't really get that tourist traffic, and the only major cities along it are Charlotte and Atlanta.

3. Poor planning of commercial developments by Henry County in McDonough, allowing shopping centers to be built right along side interstate exits without a secondary road network to improve their connectivity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by alco89 View Post
This is the best answer ESPECIALLY number 2. You can't efficiently get to/from Florida from anywhere north and west of Atlanta without funneling down 75. All you have to do is pay attention to all the different states' car tags while sitting in traffic. Lots of Canadians too.

I also sometimes wonder if the huge rolling hills near Jodeco and Hudson Bridge exacerbate the issue when the large volume of semis struggle to climb them from dead-stops.
Also keep in mind that I-75 through North Georgia and metro Atlanta carries interstate/transcontinental traffic headed to (and from) Florida not just from cities along the I-75 corridor like Windsor, Detroit, Toledo, Dayton, Cincinnati, Lexington and Knoxville, but also carries interstate/transcontinental traffic headed to (and from) Florida from points north and west like Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis, Louisville and Nashville.

I-75 through North Georgia and metro Atlanta also carries much freight truck traffic headed to and from the growing international seaport at Savannah along with the massive amount of all types of interstate/transcontinental traffic that it carries to and from Florida.

What helps to make the traffic so bad on I-75 through an area like McDonough and Henry County is the massive amount of local/regional commuter traffic that is added to the road along with the massive amount of interstate/transcontinental traffic generated by points south like the Port of Savannah and Florida.

Like alco89 refers to, northbound I-75 traffic from Florida and westbound I-16 truck traffic from the Port of Savannah merges onto one roadway (I-75 northbound) at Macon and is funneled through the Atlanta metro area on one I-75 roadway that basically has only three northbound lanes through the McDonough area.

Meanwhile, southbound I-75 traffic from points north (Knoxville, Lexington, Cincinnati, Dayton, Toledo, Detroit and Windsor/southwest Ontario) and I-24 eastbound traffic from points northwest (Nashville, Louisville, Indianapolis, Chicago, Milwaukee and Minneapolis) merges into one roadway (I-75 southbound) at Chattanooga and is funneled through the Atlanta area on the I-75 and I-285 southbound roadways.

It is a massive amount of local and through traffic that the I-75 corridor (and I-285 West Wall corridor) is being asked to handle on roadways with limited capacity, particularly through the McDonough area where I-75 basically only has three through lanes in each direction with a reversible toll lane that was just added a couple of years ago.

The merging of 2 lanes of I-675 southbound traffic into a 3-lane I-75 southbound roadway in the Stockbridge area (that had 4 southbound lanes before the GA 138 exit north of the I-675 merge) is also another factor that contributes to a massive bottleneck of traffic along I-75 southbound through the McDonough area.

GDOT basically takes 4 lanes of already extremely heavy traffic on I-75 southbound, merges it down into 3 lanes at GA 138, then dumps 2 more lanes of very heavy traffic from I-675 southbound into those 3 lanes of I-75 southbound through the McDonough area, and (with the exception of the reversible toll lane that opened in 2017) pretty much absolutely refuses to widen the road and provide meaningful alternatives (like an Outer Perimeter bypass and a high level of high-capacity mass transit for local and regional commuters) to deal with the exceptionally heavy traffic.

It makes absolutely no sense for GDOT to expect a 6-lane I-75 roadway through Henry County to be able to handle 12-20 lanes worth of traffic at peak times.
 
Old 05-21-2019, 03:01 AM
 
385 posts, read 163,790 times
Reputation: 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnHarris1 View Post
There are many “bad traffic days” on Atlanta’s roads, but an 18-hour stretch from Thursday, May 16th, and into Friday, the 17th, was absurd. In particular, the subsequent closures of I-75/northbound between McDonough and Stockbridge on Thursday almost entirely proved Murphy’s Law. This was a period for the ages, and the horror also broke out elsewhere..."

FULL STORY: https://www.ajc.com/news/local/gridl...lB80hXJsDW9cK/

SOURCE: AJC
Ain't there a heatwave coming? I'm sure that's the problem: people are losing their ever lovin' minds. Meanwhile I'm over here dodging potholes on inner city streets like I'm Cam Newton. For me, public transit at max adds an additional 20 minutes per commute, but if those 20 minutes elongate my life then let's ride!
 
Old 05-21-2019, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Decatur, GA
5,438 posts, read 4,206,563 times
Reputation: 2943
Quote:
Originally Posted by citydwelling View Post
If the original Atlanta highway plan had been built, there would be a freeway where my house and every other house on my street is right now. Huge parts of the eastside neighborhoods that are the hottest in the city would be dead zones. It is a bizarre little fantasy to suggest that the highway planners had the right idea.
Are the neighborhoods around I-20 dead zones? Is Buckhead where 400 is a dead zone? No. Ridiculous. Another classic case of letting the wants of the few outweigh the needs of the many, and we're all far worse off for it.
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