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Old 07-08-2019, 07:41 AM
 
2,070 posts, read 830,621 times
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https://www.city-journal.org/atlanta-growth

Thoughts on this?

I havent really checked around but I'm pretty sure most of the GDP in this country resides in the Pacific region, with San Francisco currently having the highest. How does Atlanta fair against eastern cities in this realm? Reason I state is it seems our GDP flows from west to east gradually weakening the further east it flows so I'm not real sure it's fair to compare it to places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, ect in this attribute.

Never really took much heart into mind over this but the growth from 1.4 to 6 million people between 1960 to current is pretty insane... but I do feel the article is right about Atlanta now facing competition that it never had to before (Nashville, Charlotte, smaller and growing sunbelt metros)
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:18 AM
 
260 posts, read 159,995 times
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The tone of the author I felt was a bit pessimistic. A city of 1.5M can easily have a 5-10% population growth in 10 years but not a city of 6M when we are talking in percentages. Also as of last year Atlanta is still the 3rd fastest growing metro area after Dallas and Houston. There is a competition in Nashville, Charlotte but Atlanta is still the only place that gives you that big metropolitan feeling in the South East in terms of diversity, air connectivity and corporate presence.

Some of the comments below the article give us the hint. The north side is booming and is becoming a job and population center of it's own. Any big metro area that grows beyond 7 to 8M is prone to this. It's not practical to expect everything to be concentrated in downtown and midtown and expect people to drive there everyday.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:32 AM
Status: "Apparently not a person." (set 28 days ago)
 
5,102 posts, read 3,311,260 times
Reputation: 3387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
https://www.city-journal.org/atlanta-growth

Thoughts on this?

I havent really checked around but I'm pretty sure most of the GDP in this country resides in the Pacific region, with San Francisco currently having the highest. How does Atlanta fair against eastern cities in this realm? Reason I state is it seems our GDP flows from west to east gradually weakening the further east it flows so I'm not real sure it's fair to compare it to places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, ect in this attribute.
I'm not sure this is true, at least according to this wikipedia page: List of U.S. metropolitan areas by GDP. Don't know how accurate it is.

Shows NYC as the largest by far, followed by LA, Chicago, Dallas, DC, then San Fran. Atlanta is #10.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:50 AM
 
3,620 posts, read 1,207,162 times
Reputation: 2368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
https://www.city-journal.org/atlanta-growth

Thoughts on this?

I havent really checked around but I'm pretty sure most of the GDP in this country resides in the Pacific region, with San Francisco currently having the highest. How does Atlanta fair against eastern cities in this realm? Reason I state is it seems our GDP flows from west to east gradually weakening the further east it flows so I'm not real sure it's fair to compare it to places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, ect in this attribute.

Never really took much heart into mind over this but the growth from 1.4 to 6 million people between 1960 to current is pretty insane... but I do feel the article is right about Atlanta now facing competition that it never had to before (Nashville, Charlotte, smaller and growing sunbelt metros)
We kind of had this same discussion in the thread below a few months ago. And I still think my post is relevant to this topic.

FWIW, my post didn't account for the effects of the culture war ongoing inside the state capitol.

Has metro ATL lost the traits of what once made it desirable to so many?

Quote:
There's a lot of things I like about Atlanta:

1. Weather (Would never have the awesome weather we're seeing this week back in Michigan this time of year).

2. Tree Canopy.

3. Southern Hospitality (everyone's well-mannered and friendly, even many of the transplants after being here for so long).

4. Relatively low COL.

That said, I do have some concerns/uncertainty about the future.

1. Corporate M&As. We've been seeing an historically high number of them recently, and they don't seem to be slowing down. I think we can honestly say that the BB&T/SunTrust as well as the AT&T/Time Warner mergers were completely unexpected, and it's looking like Atlanta will end up on the short end of both sticks. I know Atlanta's claim to fame is its diversity of industries, but this can be a good and a bad thing. It's a bad thing in that when these M&As take place, the newly combined companies will have a tendency to gravitate to regions where there's a much more extensive ecosystem of talent/knowledge/infrastructure to support the combined company in said industry (such as finance/banking with Charlotte and Entertainment/Media with NYC/LA).

It will be interesting to see where Atlanta stands 10-20 years from now as more of these M&As continue to occur at a record pace. Part of the reason some Rust Belt cities (looking at St. Louis and Cincinnati for examples) that were major in the early/mid 20th century lost their prestige and luster was because they lost many of their locally based "major" corporations via M&As. Not saying that will happen to Atlanta, but you never know what the future will bring.

2. Growth rates/patterns. Back in the 70s - 2000s, it seemed like everyone was enjoying the prosperity as shopping centers and massive subdivisions were popping up everywhere you went. Also, there was a lot less wealth inequality as Atlanta had a ton of jobs that paid a solid middle class wage for unskilled workers (Ford/GM plants, the Army bases, Eastern Airlines, etc.).

Today, between the real estate collapse back in 2007-2009 combined with those loss of those plants, the Airline and army bases, Atlanta seems to be a lot more unequal in terms of economic growth.

Many parts of Metro Atlanta that were experiencing explosive growth prior to the recession (I.E. Coweta, Paulding and Douglas County) have yet to regain their mojo and have even gone downhill (I.E. South Fulton and South DeKalb). Yet, the highly sought-after areas into the region seem to be reaching a critical mass where the infrastructure can no longer handle much more traffic/development and the COL is getting ridiculous. Common sense would dictate that growth would start to spillover into other parts of Atlanta that still have a ton of undeveloped land and is still cheap (similar to other metro areas, like in Houston, Phoenix, LA, even Nashville, etc.) but that isn't showing signs of happening (yet).

On the flip side, the city of Atlanta proper is experiencing an unprecedented amount of infill and growing at possibly its fastest rate in history. There's a good chance 10-20 years from now that it will offer a much more solid urban lifestyle and have a higher population/wealth density. Metro Atlanta also continues to witness a decent amount of raw job creation in a diversity of industries (even if they're widely unequal in terms of location/pay scales and mainly back office/support/service roles), which should ensure at least a moderate pace of growth for the region in the coming years.

In what form that growth will take will be the hardest thing to peg.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:54 AM
 
3,620 posts, read 1,207,162 times
Reputation: 2368
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
I'm not sure this is true, at least according to this wikipedia page: List of U.S. metropolitan areas by GDP. Don't know how accurate it is.

Shows NYC as the largest by far, followed by LA, Chicago, Dallas, DC, then San Fran. Atlanta is #10.
The OP might have been referring to GDP per-capita.
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Old 07-08-2019, 09:02 AM
 
3,620 posts, read 1,207,162 times
Reputation: 2368
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthAtlanta View Post
The tone of the author I felt was a bit pessimistic. A city of 1.5M can easily have a 5-10% population growth in 10 years but not a city of 6M when we are talking in percentages. Also as of last year Atlanta is still the 3rd fastest growing metro area after Dallas and Houston. There is a competition in Nashville, Charlotte but Atlanta is still the only place that gives you that big metropolitan feeling in the South East in terms of diversity, air connectivity and corporate presence.

Some of the comments below the article give us the hint. The north side is booming and is becoming a job and population center of it's own. Any big metro area that grows beyond 7 to 8M is prone to this. It's not practical to expect everything to be concentrated in downtown and midtown and expect people to drive there everyday.
A commenter named "Tina Trent" seemed to hit on some of the points I highlihhted a couple posts up, in a much shorter and sweeter summary.
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Old 07-08-2019, 10:06 AM
 
2,070 posts, read 830,621 times
Reputation: 1658
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
I'm not sure this is true, at least according to this wikipedia page: List of U.S. metropolitan areas by GDP. Don't know how accurate it is.

Shows NYC as the largest by far, followed by LA, Chicago, Dallas, DC, then San Fran. Atlanta is #10.
Its true. You are comparing a single city but I am comparing an entire region. California currently holds the highest GDP in the country.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_California

San Fran while is extremely expensive to live in, currently also has the highest average income in the nation as well.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.bus...economy-2018-4

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.the...ry-world-earth

Major stem businesses / IT corporations, spawn in the Pacific and trickle down operations further East. This movement is also a BIG reason as to why DFW is doing so well economically right now as their location in central time and proximity to their parent corporations while capabilities of redistributing tasks further east makes it an ideal hub in that aspect.
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Old 07-08-2019, 12:28 PM
bu2
 
10,010 posts, read 6,441,414 times
Reputation: 4161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
https://www.city-journal.org/atlanta-growth

Thoughts on this?

I havent really checked around but I'm pretty sure most of the GDP in this country resides in the Pacific region, with San Francisco currently having the highest. How does Atlanta fair against eastern cities in this realm? Reason I state is it seems our GDP flows from west to east gradually weakening the further east it flows so I'm not real sure it's fair to compare it to places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, ect in this attribute.

Never really took much heart into mind over this but the growth from 1.4 to 6 million people between 1960 to current is pretty insane... but I do feel the article is right about Atlanta now facing competition that it never had to before (Nashville, Charlotte, smaller and growing sunbelt metros)
I think it points out that Atlanta has started resting on its laurels and not planned for future growth by improving infrastructure. It doesn't mention water & sewer, but that is a factor as well.

"... Its freeways are among the nationís widest but also the most congested. Atlanta failed to rearchitect its freeway network as it grew, retaining its sixties-era beltway-and-spoke system. By contrast, Houston is working on its third beltway. The net result: Atlanta outside its I-285 perimeter is by far the most developed urban area in the world without non-radial freeways, according to demographer Wendell Cox. The metro area has the nationís third-lowest share of jobs accessible to the average commuter in 30 minutes or less...."
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Old 07-08-2019, 07:56 PM
 
172 posts, read 75,971 times
Reputation: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
We kind of had this same discussion in the thread below a few months ago. And I still think my post is relevant to this topic.

FWIW, my post didn't account for the effects of the culture war ongoing inside the state capitol.

Has metro ATL lost the traits of what once made it desirable to so many?
I think Atlanta has kind of found it niche in certain business segments. Recently, we have just been losing the odd ends of certain segments like Suntrust (banking). While these things are bad, the main niche that Atlanta specializes in is still there. With transportation, you have Delta, UPS, Veritiv, now Norfolk Southern, and a other companies that help with transportation. We have fintech with Global Payments, Fleetcor, and other large regional offices throughout the area. You have wholesale/ retail with Home Depot, Genuine Parts, Westrock, Mohawk, AGCO, etc. And then you have fast food with places like Chik Fil A, Waffle House, and Roark Capital with all off its brands that give ATL fast food prowess.

Even with these niches, I still agree that ATL has definietly lost some corporate presence, but it could definitely be a lot worse.
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Old 07-09-2019, 12:20 PM
 
3,481 posts, read 5,110,412 times
Reputation: 1544
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthAtlanta View Post
The tone of the author I felt was a bit pessimistic. A city of 1.5M can easily have a 5-10% population growth in 10 years but not a city of 6M when we are talking in percentages. Also as of last year Atlanta is still the 3rd fastest growing metro area after Dallas and Houston. There is a competition in Nashville, Charlotte but Atlanta is still the only place that gives you that big metropolitan feeling in the South East in terms of diversity, air connectivity and corporate presence.

Some of the comments below the article give us the hint. The north side is booming and is becoming a job and population center of it's own. Any big metro area that grows beyond 7 to 8M is prone to this. It's not practical to expect everything to be concentrated in downtown and midtown and expect people to drive there everyday.
A good example large metro areas which grew beyond the 8m is Chicago. The metro area has sprawled well beyond the traditional downtown to where there is clusters of office complexes which in many metro areas would be the traditional downtown. This is one of the hottest areas for business in the US & will continue to keep growing.

GA DOT needs to address the lack of public transportation along the 400/perimeter area. What is needed is heavy rail running all the way up to cummings with 4 to 6 spurs into Forsyth county & into Northern Fulton & then turn the Sandy Springs station into a transfer point, where you can transfer to public transportation for the local area. A line from Sandy Springs to the Braves stadium with several stops would be a good start.

The other big fix is to run Marta to the Braves Stadium, this is a no brainer.
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