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Old Today, 07:05 AM
 
1,804 posts, read 1,855,100 times
Reputation: 1643

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Bike lanes have nothing to do with displacement. They are used by riders of all race, socioeconomic class, etc. They are infrastructure.
Is this true though? Do you have the numbers on that? Most people I see in the bike lanes are middle to upper middle class bikers with high-end gear and/or young singles.

I do not see a lot of working class Latino women for example in the bike lanes. I don't see elderly white women represented proportionally in the bike lanes either. I don't see elderly black women in the bike lanes in proportion to their % of the population. I just really doubt that the bike lanes are as egalitarian as you claim.

Are they used by the newcomers to the neighborhood at higher rates than those residents who were already in the neighborhood?
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Old Today, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,418 posts, read 17,576,989 times
Reputation: 5423
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlJan View Post
Is this true though? Do you have the numbers on that? Most people I see in the bike lanes are middle to upper middle class bikers with high-end gear and/or young singles.
What neighborhood or community are you observing this in?
Quote:
I do not see a lot of working class Latino women for example in the bike lanes. I don't see elderly white women represented proportionally in the bike lanes either. I don't see elderly black women in the bike lanes in proportion to their % of the population. I just really doubt that the bike lanes are as egalitarian as you claim.
Just because you don't see at the sliver of of the day you are there, does not mean they don't exist. AKA the Invisible Rider.
Quote:
Are they used by the newcomers to the neighborhood at higher rates than those residents who were already in the neighborhood?
Were the new residents attracted to the area because of the LIT infrastructure?
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Old Today, 09:11 AM
 
29,386 posts, read 26,339,390 times
Reputation: 10281
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
Bike lanes have nothing to do with displacement. They are used by riders of all race, socioeconomic class, etc. They are infrastructure. Thought like this is why The City of Atlanta installed a great, high quality tow-way, protected cycle track on Westview Dr using grants from REI and People for Bikes; then torn out a section of it because of a politically connected church.
I thought the locals objected because they'd been left out of the loop, and then boom, the bike lanes are put in.
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Old Today, 09:15 AM
 
Location: North Atlanta
5,443 posts, read 3,838,987 times
Reputation: 2979
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I thought the locals objected because they'd been left out of the loop, and then boom, the bike lanes are put in.
It wasn't the locals, but the church that wanted the lanes removed.
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Old Today, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,418 posts, read 17,576,989 times
Reputation: 5423
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I thought the locals objected because they'd been left out of the loop, and then boom, the bike lanes are put in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulch View Post
It wasn't the locals, but the church that wanted the lanes removed.
Bingo, Gulch is correct as evidence to the only section removed is directly bordering the church.
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Old Today, 10:29 AM
bu2
 
10,049 posts, read 6,448,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulch View Post
The idea that bike lanes are strictly for white people is absolutely disgusting and anyone who subscribes to that belief is an ignorant moron.
Its pretty ignorant to ignore that almost all those riding are 20-30 something white people.
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Old Today, 10:59 AM
 
Location: North Atlanta
5,443 posts, read 3,838,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Its pretty ignorant to ignore that almost all those riding are 20-30 something white people.
I'm referring to the idea that it's sound policy to not build out bike lanes because they're viewed by morons as a "white person thing."
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Old Today, 11:07 AM
bu2
 
10,049 posts, read 6,448,118 times
Reputation: 4171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulch View Post
I'm referring to the idea that it's sound policy to not build out bike lanes because they're viewed by morons as a "white person thing."
Ok, I misinterpreted what you were saying.
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Old Today, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,415 posts, read 10,078,074 times
Reputation: 5922
This debate always seems to be futile. The overall gentrification argument that is, not the poorly thought out brochure....

If a neighborhood is more than rough around the edges... if it has derelict properties and vacancies and crime and all the other negative ills that go along with it, isn't there room for improvement to better the place, bring in businesses and make it a safe place to live?

Is there a lesser level that it should aspire to so it doesn't increase the value exponentially? Maybe not too trendy and still rough around the edges?

Seems the places that are skyrocketing and seeing trendy businesses and clientele are simply following the old real estate maxim.... location, location, location. Having property near the core of major cities is a thing these days and has been for the past couple of decades.

What is the answer for those being priced out? Keep it derelict and crime ridden? Why wish that on lower income people? Tell only a certain demographic that they are allowed in? Racist, no? What about the pioneers that invested their own money and sweat equity to build up a neighborhood one house by one? Should they not receive a recompense for what was a not a sure thing?

I don't see an easy answer here. I do not think it is a good idea to lump the word gentrification with a broad racist brush. Perhaps it is a reversal of old racist attitudes. White people used to flee at the sight of one black face on the street. That a younger generation of whites is ok being in a diverse neighborhood, is this not a reversal of racism of the past? Or is racism going to always be with us no matter what is done?

I would hate that that is the answer.
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Old Today, 01:41 PM
 
1,116 posts, read 990,736 times
Reputation: 1608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
This debate always seems to be futile. The overall gentrification argument that is, not the poorly thought out brochure....

If a neighborhood is more than rough around the edges... if it has derelict properties and vacancies and crime and all the other negative ills that go along with it, isn't there room for improvement to better the place, bring in businesses and make it a safe place to live?

Is there a lesser level that it should aspire to so it doesn't increase the value exponentially? Maybe not too trendy and still rough around the edges?

Seems the places that are skyrocketing and seeing trendy businesses and clientele are simply following the old real estate maxim.... location, location, location. Having property near the core of major cities is a thing these days and has been for the past couple of decades.

What is the answer for those being priced out? Keep it derelict and crime ridden? Why wish that on lower income people? Tell only a certain demographic that they are allowed in? Racist, no? What about the pioneers that invested their own money and sweat equity to build up a neighborhood one house by one? Should they not receive a recompense for what was a not a sure thing?

I don't see an easy answer here. I do not think it is a good idea to lump the word gentrification with a broad racist brush. Perhaps it is a reversal of old racist attitudes. White people used to flee at the sight of one black face on the street. That a younger generation of whites is ok being in a diverse neighborhood, is this not a reversal of racism of the past? Or is racism going to always be with us no matter what is done?

I would hate that that is the answer.
Very well said. Most industrialized countries are going to gradually raise their standard of living, and one has a choice to do the same (get new skills, invest in assets, not liabilities, etc.), or go stagnant. Its hard to have sympathy for those that choose to be stagnant and watch the world around them improve. When I move into a new community, I've never felt owed some sort of guarantee that it wouldn't change (let alone improve). I realize this is a narrow view of the topic, but many studies have shown that the term is overblown in both definition and prevalence.
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