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Old Today, 08:03 AM
 
3,144 posts, read 1,453,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
If they are FT then that's doubtful if they are getting $15+ an hour.
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
The poverty threshold for a family of 6 is $34K/year For a family of 4, the threshold for food stamps is anything under $32K

($15/hr full time is only $31K/year)

Besides that, not all of the employees will be full time.

Just from my experience, these kind of jobs are seldom full-time. I've worked retail for a number of years and all the jobs that pay $10-$14 ish and this would include Amazon-like jobs, are very part-time. I remember weeks I was barely on the schedule. Me and my co-workers would get less than 10 hours a week and this would go on for very long. They seem to be implementing this system where they look at peak times and only want people working during peak times which can be maybe 2-3 hours in the evening/morning. I can easily see how these people would need to rely on benefits but I do wonder how they would survive because benefits are temporary unless you have a disability, etc. Depending on the shift if are given, it can make it extremely difficult to get/keep a second job. I literally applied to a job the other day that said you could get up to 20 hours in a given week but don't think you're not working a full work week...you'd still be working 5 days, which means most days you wouldn't be working for more than 4 hours.


Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhornet View Post
Yes, because Amazon is going to hire a bunch of unemployed people to fill these positions lol. Likely it'll be folks that are already working some type of hard labor job that go there for an extra dollar or two an hour. Nobody that is sitting around drawing government benefits would last a week in one of these positions. And 90% of them won't make it 5 years. The ones that do will end up with bad knees, a bad back and tons of other health problems. Like I said, ive done it. It's a crap job and the workers get treated like garbage.

I appreciate your posts. I think people need to see the good and bad. It will bring jobs and this is a positive. For people who have trouble gaining employment, this may be a good option for them due to this kind of job experiencing high turnover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
&


Everyone roots for and desires for the IT presence then when rents and mortgages soar through the clouds everyone complains. I never understand that.

I was going to ask about this...the effects on property valuation. It's one of the main reasons people in Queens, NY were so vocal about them not wanting Amazon in their neighborhood.

$62k is nowhere near enough to support a family of 6 comfortably. That's easily six figure territory.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBurgh View Post
No one is being forced to work there



I don't think the person was trying to indicate that anyone is being forced to work there. They were just providing another side to Amazon opening up a facility in Gwinnett. Actually...I've been doing a lot of research into mass incarceration and the aftermath of it. I would argue some people are forced to work for companies like these because there are only a handful of companies actually hiring and keeping people with a criminal record and this very much includes non-violent charges/convictions.
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Old Today, 08:20 AM
 
1,431 posts, read 784,837 times
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I hope to see many more relocations/new offices that lead to white collar jobs as well. While I'm happy to bring any jobs to the area for people, I so think Atlanta metro seems to have fewer white collar jobs as a percentage compared to other large metros where I have lived. A healthy city must have many job opportunities, as well as a large and thriving upper middle class.
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Old Today, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,293 posts, read 3,508,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forhall View Post
I hope to see many more relocations/new offices that lead to white collar jobs as well. While I'm happy to bring any jobs to the area for people, I so think Atlanta metro seems to have fewer white collar jobs as a percentage compared to other large metros where I have lived. A healthy city must have many job opportunities, as well as a large and thriving upper middle class.
Atlanta has always had a large amount of white collar jobs, and they are still increasing.There are many thousands more on the way, particularly in Midtown. We have many, many more than our larger peer Miami for one example.
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Old Today, 09:06 AM
 
2,057 posts, read 825,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forhall View Post
I hope to see many more relocations/new offices that lead to white collar jobs as well. While I'm happy to bring any jobs to the area for people, I so think Atlanta metro seems to have fewer white collar jobs as a percentage compared to other large metros where I have lived. A healthy city must have many job opportunities, as well as a large and thriving upper middle class.
Theres also the opposite end of the spectrum, a city that has too many white collar jobs that half the population isnt qualified for, thats when you end up with homeless littering the streets every other block like you see in San Francisco, Seattle and heck even Austin. There needs to be balance between the two. Atlanta is a logistics hub so warehousing, trucking, and blue collar labor tends to stand out more because it's very easy to attract those industries in Atlanta... while they're not the highest paying, they definitely have their purpose and it is much better with than completely without them.
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Old Today, 09:49 AM
 
3,611 posts, read 1,201,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Theres also the opposite end of the spectrum, a city that has too many white collar jobs that half the population isnt qualified for, thats when you end up with homeless littering the streets every other block like you see in San Francisco, Seattle and heck even Austin. There needs to be balance between the two. Atlanta is a logistics hub so warehousing, trucking, and blue collar labor tends to stand out more because it's very easy to attract those industries in Atlanta... while they're not the highest paying, they definitely have their purpose and it is much better with than completely without them.
On the flip side of the spectrum, you have places too heavily reliant on blue collar jobs. Inland Empire is a perfect example. There have been numerous articles about the extremely long commutes its white collar residents face everyday to/from Los Angeles just to find work, as well as the pollution generated from the excessive trcuk traffic and the health problems they cause.
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Old Today, 11:32 AM
 
3,297 posts, read 850,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
On the flip side of the spectrum, you have places too heavily reliant on blue collar jobs. Inland Empire is a perfect example. There have been numerous articles about the extremely long commutes its white collar residents face everyday to/from Los Angeles just to find work, as well as the pollution generated from the excessive trcuk traffic and the health problems they cause.
My goodness this sounds like something regurgitated from the bowels of the ivory tower.

Blue collar jobs went where there was blue collar labor. Not everyone is cut out for white collar labor. Maybe if you stop thinking about blue collar labor as "maybe the bottom 20%" and acquiesce in that not only would more high school graduates (even TODAY) like to work such jobs, that many pay wages that would boost one's income several social strata above entry level white collar ranks.

I think we're sending too many kids to college. And sending the perfectly viable alternatives offshore.

1. Not everyone wants to work in an office, or "work their way up" to a desk job
2. Not everyone wants to be a manager
3. Not all blue collar jobs are worth only minimum wage
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Old Today, 11:42 AM
 
2,057 posts, read 825,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
On the flip side of the spectrum, you have places too heavily reliant on blue collar jobs. Inland Empire is a perfect example. There have been numerous articles about the extremely long commutes its white collar residents face everyday to/from Los Angeles just to find work, as well as the pollution generated from the excessive trcuk traffic and the health problems they cause.
In that aspect the southern end of the Atlanta metro is hit the hardest.
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Old Today, 11:53 AM
 
3,611 posts, read 1,201,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
My goodness this sounds like something regurgitated from the bowels of the ivory tower.

Blue collar jobs went where there was blue collar labor. Not everyone is cut out for white collar labor. Maybe if you stop thinking about blue collar labor as "maybe the bottom 20%" and acquiesce in that not only would more high school graduates (even TODAY) like to work such jobs, that many pay wages that would boost one's income several social strata above entry level white collar ranks.

I think we're sending too many kids to college. And sending the perfectly viable alternatives offshore.

1. Not everyone wants to work in an office, or "work their way up" to a desk job
2. Not everyone wants to be a manager
3. Not all blue collar jobs are worth only minimum wage
Talk about assumptions.

First off, I don't have a problem with "blue collar jobs" and I don't live in this "ivory tower" you speak of. I was born and raised in a blue collar family and a blue collar city (Detroit). So if you're trying to accuse me of being uppity, you have the wrong one.

What I do have a problem with are employers who destroy the environment they occupy with their intense operations but fail to treat their employees well such as offering them decent wages/benefits and offering them job security. Warehouses (such as this Amazon one) bring the worst of both world because their activity puts a ton of wear/tear on surrounding infrastructure and the traffic they generate produces a ton of pollution yet the workers they hire are treated like crap.

From a quality of life standpoint, I don't see how the benefits of having them in a commumity outweigh the drawbacks when they're the only type of investment occurring and those are the only type of jobs being created. The workers have relatively little disposable income to spend at local restaurants/stores, children tend to grow up with relatively more health problems from the poorer air/water quality, etc.

I agree with the poster earlier who said balance is key when it comes to economic growth. The goal should be to attract employers that place a high value in labor from all walks of life.
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Old Today, 11:55 AM
 
3,611 posts, read 1,201,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
In that aspect the southern end of the Atlanta metro is hit the hardest.
That's why I said in another thread that I-75 south is becoming the Inland Empire of Atlanta. It's not as intensely developed yet, but it's getting there.

Last edited by citidata18; Today at 01:23 PM..
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Old Today, 12:04 PM
 
3,297 posts, read 850,592 times
Reputation: 3789
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
Talk about assumptions.

First off, I don't have a problem with "blue collar jobs" and I don't live in this "ivory tower" you speak of. I was born and raised in a blue collar family and a blue collar city (Detroit). So if you're trying to accuse me of being uppity, you have the wrong one.

What I do have a problem with are employers who destroy the environment they occupy with their intense operations but fail to treat their employees well such as offering them decent wages/benefits and offering them job security. Warehouses (such as this Amazon one) bring the worst of both world because their activity puts a ton of wear/tear on surrounding infrastructure and the traffic they generate produces a ton of pollution yet the workers they hire are treated like crap.

From a quality of life standpoint, I don't see how it's benefits of having them in a commumity outweigh the drawbacks when they're the only type of investment occurring and those are the only type of jobs being created. The workers have relatively little disposable income to spend at local restaurants/stores, children tend to grow up with relatively more health problems from the poorer air/water quality, etc.

I agree with the poster earlier who said balance is key when it comes to economic growth. The goal should be to attract employers that place a high value in labor from all walks of life.
Watched an interview where Jeff Bezos was speaking to a German TV show host about his warehouses in Europe. They are a much more union-minded bunch than the US. His answer was along the lines of "we want our employees to have a choice ... blah blah ... with no intermediary" and was not popular at all.

Amazon has a sort of kangaroo court for when an employee disputes corrective action. It's a panel of (surprise) Amazon managers who have an adversarial relationship with employees to begin with, except they can override the pending action if and when it would cause the company to lose face with the public, depending on the social issue of the week.

Last edited by ddm2k; Today at 01:14 PM..
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