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Old Yesterday, 07:53 AM
 
29,476 posts, read 26,480,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Unfortunately there is no easy solution but I have heard that our government has alot to do with it due to the restriction of building denser communities where they are needed thus pushing the existing dense communities in higher demand and escalating their prices. Low density developments can only sprawl so far before they become too inaccessible from job locations or they plainly run out of land. Those developments also face developmental restrictions, but not as much as dense development. In a sense so much has to be approved before new housing developments can go up that they literally cannot keep up with demand therefor creating artificial shortages.
The problem is that when you allow more density developers just slap up more ultra-expensive housing that is way beyond the means of ordinary folks.

By contrast, most reasonably priced housing gets built in lower density areas.
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Old Yesterday, 08:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
The problem is that when you allow more density developers just slap up more ultra-expensive housing that is way beyond the means of ordinary folks.

By contrast, most reasonably priced housing gets built in lower density areas.
Yeah, It also all falls into our capitalist economy. Developers are not in this to put everybody in houses, they are in this to make money. They throw up most dense housing near highly desirable areas (job sites, recreational / attraction areas (like the beltline) ect...) which by landvalue alone immediately inflates the price then tap on they're most likely going to be an upscale development and whammo you get a $2 - 2.5k monthly rent apartment.
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Old Yesterday, 09:09 AM
 
29,476 posts, read 26,480,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Yeah, It also all falls into our capitalist economy. Developers are not in this to put everybody in houses, they are in this to make money. They throw up most dense housing near highly desirable areas (job sites, recreational / attraction areas (like the beltline) ect...) which by landvalue alone immediately inflates the price then tap on they're most likely going to be an upscale development and whammo you get a $2 - 2.5k monthly rent apartment.
Even in command economies like China where mega density is allowed (many times that in the ATL), you still wind up with skyrocketing rents and lack of affordable housing.
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Old Yesterday, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Even in command economies like China where mega density is allowed (many times that in the ATL), you still wind up with skyrocketing rents and lack of affordable housing.
Yeah but you also have to consider that China's metro areas are ampletons more populated than what is seen in the U.S. The U.S. is actually one of the least dense while most resourceful nations in the world. The only places we have that come close to touching them in the density department is NYC and Chicago.... in the population department - Los Angeles.
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Old Yesterday, 12:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Yeah but you also have to consider that China's metro areas are ampletons more populated than what is seen in the U.S. The U.S. is actually one of the least dense while most resourceful nations in the world. The only places we have that come close to touching them in the density department is NYC and Chicago.... in the population department - Los Angeles.
Only mildly related, but I just got back from a work trip to China yesterday, and anecdotally noticed that the density of cities appeared to be the same whether it was Shanghai (20M+) or a small city, the large cities just covered more area. Even the smaller cities that were more in the 500K-1M person range had a crazy amount of density. It was not uncommon to see a 30 story high rise in the middle of nowhere. Virtually everyone lives in high rises, most are earth-tone from the more heavily communist era. I'm not implying this was good or bad, just some of my observations.
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Old Yesterday, 02:49 PM
bu2
 
10,143 posts, read 6,516,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
The problem is that when you allow more density developers just slap up more ultra-expensive housing that is way beyond the means of ordinary folks.

By contrast, most reasonably priced housing gets built in lower density areas.
But in the end it creates affordable housing as people move up.
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Old Today, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
1,190 posts, read 544,732 times
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When you are starting out with already relatively low housing prices, then it’s easy for them to increase in value. I heard that the bottom fell out during the recession, so maybe prices were undervalued anyways.

To my knowledge, there aren’t many major corporate relocations to Atlanta which should begin to slow population growth and demand for housing.
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Old Today, 03:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Soccernerd View Post
When you are starting out with already relatively low housing prices, then itís easy for them to increase in value. I heard that the bottom fell out during the recession, so maybe prices were undervalued anyways.

To my knowledge, there arenít many major corporate relocations to Atlanta which should begin to slow population growth and demand for housing.
Even without that there is still a steady demand of people moving from more expensive metro's into Atlanta.
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Old Today, 04:37 PM
 
288 posts, read 172,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soccernerd View Post
When you are starting out with already relatively low housing prices, then itís easy for them to increase in value. I heard that the bottom fell out during the recession, so maybe prices were undervalued anyways.

To my knowledge, there arenít many major corporate relocations to Atlanta which should begin to slow population growth and demand for housing.
I doubt that. High profile fortune 50 companies employ only 25 to 30% of the work force in the Atlanta metro area, I remember reading this stat some where a few years ago. It's the regional offices, satellite offices and the mid level enterprises that employ the remaining 70%. There is a steady influx of these regional offices and smaller companies into the region. Unless something changes we will keep gaining between 50 to 100k residents per year. Most of the big IT companies like Google and Facebook have a presence here. Google is currently in talks to lease 200,000 SqFt of office space in Midtown. In this tight labor market every company wants to tap into the workforce available in other metro areas not just in the metro area where they are located in. Not every one wants to move to Seattle or Bay area, so the companies open regional offices here and hire employees here..

https://www.bisnow.com/atlanta/news/...eachtree-97302
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Old Today, 04:57 PM
 
2,243 posts, read 883,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthAtlanta View Post
I doubt that. High profile fortune 50 companies employ only 25 to 30% of the work force in the Atlanta metro area, I remember reading this stat some where a few years ago. It's the regional offices, satellite offices and the mid level enterprises that employ the remaining 70%. There is a steady influx of these regional offices and smaller companies into the region. Unless something changes we will keep gaining between 50 to 100k residents per year. Most of the big IT companies like Google and Facebook have a presence here. Google is currently in talks to lease 200,000 SqFt of office space in Midtown. In this tight labor market every company wants to tap into the workforce available in other metro areas not just in the metro area where they are located in. Not every one wants to move to Seattle or Bay area, so the companies open regional offices here and hire employees here..

https://www.bisnow.com/atlanta/news/...eachtree-97302
To my knowledge (having worked for Google) Google only has a data center shared with CenturyLink in Atlanta mainly used as a MPLS peering node. Its existance has little to do with the local workforce but more so the presence of fiberoptic links necessary to route traffic both across their MPLS and other BGP peers (as to properly advertise Google Space) They may be getting an office there in the future.

The reason companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon are expanding operations outside of their parent hub is not because noone is willing to relocate to the Pacific to employ them (as they could easily afford to pay them competitive salaries to make that relocation viable much cheaper than it is to build an entire new campus) but because regional, timezone, geographical and logistical advantages of covering more of the continent to run different operations.
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