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Old Yesterday, 08:16 AM
 
3,700 posts, read 1,259,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
My husband is from there...
And there it is...

It's unfortunate that you feel offended by my critique.
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Old Yesterday, 08:27 AM
 
1,152 posts, read 1,814,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
Oh Sweet Baby Jesus!!! Talk about a weird business decision indeed.

As a native of Michigan (Detroit), I'd first slit my wrist before moving to bum**** nowhere that is Kalamazoo.

I'm sure there are very nice people who live there and it's a fine town that suits the needs of some individuals, but you're 2-3 hours away from major cities (Chicago and Detroit), you're in the lake effect snow belt (thus virtually 9 months out of the year is solid overcast skies), it's lacking in diversity (very black/white and poor/working class) and besides Stryker, there are no other major white collar employers there (it does have a somewhat large university, but that's about it).

It's hard enough for companies trying to keep/attract talent to Metro Detroit after the auto industry collapse, so I can about imagine the hell it's been attracting/keeping talent at this design center for Newell.
I feel you, I'm from Michigan as well, Saginaw and I'd jump off a bridge before moving to Kalamazoo lol. I'm sure if fine for some people, but not my cup of tea. It's going to be an area where it's hard to attract young professionals.
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Old Today, 07:34 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,015 posts, read 612,141 times
Reputation: 1892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsville_secede View Post
I feel you, I'm from Michigan as well, Saginaw and I'd jump off a bridge before moving to Kalamazoo lol. I'm sure if fine for some people, but not my cup of tea. It's going to be an area where it's hard to attract young professionals.
I have a former friend from the Detroit Area/Southeast Michigan. He has a searing hatred for West Michigan for what ever reason. My relatives from Muskegon and Grand Rapids seem to hate Detroit or outright ignore it. They're fans of the Detroit Lions, but went to Chicago as their "big city". Michiganders make Georgians look downright peaceful and chill when it comes to their geographic divisions. A native of Macomb County I know of is always talking crazy about Oakland County and since I've never been to neither, so I just politely change the subject.
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Old Today, 06:22 PM
 
379 posts, read 357,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
It's a good company, for sure. Hopefully, it's learned from its past mistakes. However, Newell seems to still maintain this:

Newell Brands Design Center - Home

Several years ago, Newell decided to open a design center in Kalamazoo, Michigan, forcing many of its designers to relocate there. Why Kalamazoo? Good question, and I have no answer. It's as random as it sounds. The most believable story I heard is that some executive high up had roots in Michigan and wanted to move there. So he got some incentives from the state, and made it happen. That's not impossible to believe, stuff like that happens.

I have no idea if that's true, but it doesn't take a Harvard MBA to realize Kalamazoo, Michigan isn't exactly where you want to to be if you hope to attract top design talent. Rumors from the people who did make the move is the design center is a "total disaster."

This is based on third hand information, so if anyone knows better, feel free to correct.
WMU's Design Engineering Program is in the top ten in the country and Newell's design center is on WMU's Engineering School's campus. In moving their operations to Kalamazoo they have opened themselves up to being at the top of the list in getting some of the best design engineer, interns in the country. With this and adding their new location's proximity to students from the University of Michigan and Mich. State University, then you start understanding how this was a brilliant move on their part!

Kalamazoo is a very white collar, progressive and artsy city with a higher than average level of college educated population. It's downtown is vibrant and the population of the metro area has gone up every year. Even the central city that has been land locked for almost 60 years, is seeing its population rise as the city builds vertically. A few posters on here claiming to know about Michigan, either in fact have no idea of what they are talking about or they have a less than honorable agenda that they are pushing with negative comments.

Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor and Kalamazoo are thriving cities that are not struggling in attracting educated Millennials. ----Average ages: Kalamazoo- 26.2 yrs, Ann Arbor - 28, Grand Rapids- 31.1 ........
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Old Today, 08:15 PM
 
3,700 posts, read 1,259,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westernwilly View Post
WMU's Design Engineering Program is in the top ten in the country...
And I assume you have a source to back up this claim?

Every school ranking I've found doesn't show Western Michigan University anywhere within the top 10 or top 25.

https://www.collegechoice.net/rankin...fting-degrees/

https://www.collegefactual.com/major...ocused/p3.html

https://study.com/articles/Top_Schoo...gineering.html

Quote:
Kalamazoo is a very white collar, progressive and artsy city
Like most decent-sized college towns, Kalamazoo may have a not-so-insignificant professional and artsy class revolving around the University that anchors the city, but for those who don't have ties to that University, they're SOL. This is especially true if they're trying to job hop, move up the ladder within the few local companies and network with others. It's nothing like a Chicago, Atlanta or even Detroit where you can interact and meet with people from all backgrounds / walks of life and there are a ton of large employers to choose from. Thus the community isn't so clique-ish. That gets back to the point I made other about *diversity.*

Quote:
----Average ages: Kalamazoo- 26.2 yrs........
All this proves is that it does a good job of attracting people of the age that one typically attend college, because you know, it's a college town...

I'd be more interested in seeing the stats of actual working professional post-college. I'm sure it would tell a different story.

Quote:
Ann Arbor - 28
Ann Arbor is home a major flagship research university and is adjoined to the Greater Detroit area (with access to the economic opportunities and amenities it offers). Completely different dynamics at play.
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Old Today, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,343 posts, read 3,555,757 times
Reputation: 4566
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
And I assume you have a source to back up this claim?

Every school ranking I've found doesn't show Western Michigan University anywhere within the top 10 or top 25.

https://www.collegechoice.net/rankin...fting-degrees/

https://www.collegefactual.com/major...ocused/p3.html

https://study.com/articles/Top_Schoo...gineering.html



Like most decent-sized college towns, Kalamazoo may have a not-so-insignificant professional and artsy class revolving around the University that anchors the city, but for those who don't have ties to that University, they're SOL. This is especially true if they're trying to job hop, move up the ladder within the few local companies and network with others. It's nothing like a Chicago, Atlanta or even Detroit where you can interact and meet with people from all backgrounds / walks of life and there are a ton of large employers to choose from. Thus the community isn't so clique-ish. That gets back to the point I made other about *diversity.*



All this proves is that it does a good job of attracting people of the age that one typically attend college, because you know, it's a college town...

I'd be more interested in seeing the stats of actual working professional post-college. I'm sure it would tell a different story.



Ann Arbor is home a major flagship research university and is adjoined to the Greater Detroit area (with access to the economic opportunities and amenities it offers). Completely different dynamics at play.
You're the last person to ask anyone to backup what they state about WMU.You outright lied about Kalamazoo with your claim that Stryker is their largest employer, completely ignoring the fact that Pfizer with their well paid workforce double the size is their economic cornerstone.

You are clearly incapable of ever admitting to being wrong, no matter the subject.
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