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Old Yesterday, 10:41 AM
bu2
 
10,232 posts, read 6,568,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
A simple "yes" would have sufficed. So, our traffic is because people were racist. If people weren't racist, we (and the rest of the country) wouldn't have traffic. This is what we like to call blasto out yo asso. It's taking two fairly separate topics and conflating them into one idea.
You don't agree with his progressive idea so you MUST be an idiot. Don't you understand????
Actually applying knowledge outside of accepted thought is not allowed.

 
Old Yesterday, 10:57 AM
 
2,358 posts, read 922,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
I stand corrected. You are dim. Simple enough for you?
Even still though I personally feel its a bit of a stretch to say Atlanta's freeway system is 'intentionally' designed to segregate. I just don't see how that argument can really support itself. I don't see any areas where the Interstate really divides major races and really, not even wealth classes. I will say the northern suburbs tend to have better roads overall than the rest of the metro but more than half the population lives on the top end as well. Also it is also easier to say that the more affluent population seem to live off of GA-400 / I-75 / I-575 / I-85 / I-985 ...but those roads provide access to those communities and do not divide any other race or class more than any other road in the metro or for that matter the rest of the country.

Then there was the proposed I-420 which was canceled and that went through a very black neighborhood with the only section being designed was GA-166. Same for I-675... Those roads were canned due to political opposition and had nothing to do with racial cues but the fact the metro did not want to have freeways dividing major urban communities causing blight in certain sections of the city.

For MARTA rail however, yes...I can easily see and make that assertion that race plays a big roll in the lack of its expansions. Cobb, N.Fulton and Gwinnett are pretty blatantly evasive over expanding service into those communities. Truthfully so is the rest of the metro asside from Clayton who's trying to embrace it.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,594 posts, read 17,782,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Even still though I personally feel its a bit of a stretch to say Atlanta's freeway system is 'intentionally' designed to segregate. I just don't see how that argument can really support itself. I don't see any areas where the Interstate really divides major races and really, not even wealth classes. I will say the northern suburbs tend to have better roads overall than the rest of the metro but more than half the population lives on the top end as well. Also it is also easier to say that the more affluent population seem to live off of GA-400 / I-75 / I-575 / I-85 / I-985 ...but those roads provide access to those communities and do not divide any other race or class more than any other road in the metro or for that matter the rest of the country.

Then there was the proposed I-420 which was canceled and that went through a very black neighborhood with the only section being designed was GA-166. Same for I-675... Those roads were canned due to political opposition and had nothing to do with racial cues but the fact the metro did not want to have freeways dividing major urban communities causing blight in certain sections of the city.

For MARTA rail however, yes...I can easily see and make that assertion that race plays a big roll in the lack of its expansions. Cobb, N.Fulton and Gwinnett are pretty blatantly evasive over expanding service into those communities. Truthfully so is the rest of the metro asside from Clayton who's trying to embrace it.
The focus is on the first sections of freeways built
Quote:
Interstate 20, the east-west corridor that connects with I-75 and I-85 in Atlanta’s center, was deliberately plotted along a winding route in the late 1950s to serve, in the words of Mayor Bill Hartsfield, as “the boundary between the white and Negro communities” on the west side of town.
And of course everyone knows the Downtown Connector, built before the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 and the Grady Curve was built to cut Sweet Auburn (then the center of AA commerce) in half.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,281 posts, read 3,280,517 times
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Default How segregation caused oyur traffic jam

Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
You don't agree with his progressive idea so you MUST be an idiot. Don't you understand????
Actually applying knowledge outside of accepted thought is not allowed.

In all candor your words can be applied in both directions politically-speaking.
You focused only on "progressive ideas" & the idiocy thing here but as you wrote the last sentence you surely realized how it goes both ways. Right? If not, there's a tremendous dose of irony to be found there in your post.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:47 AM
 
2,358 posts, read 922,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
The focus is on the first sections of freeways built

And of course everyone knows the Downtown Connector, built before the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 and the Grady Curve was built to cut Sweet Auburn (then the center of AA commerce) in half.
Possibly impactful at that time but no more than any other major city. I-35 in Austin was built as a barrier to keep the African American population in East Austin out of downtown. DFW, where do I begin? Same for Chicago and NYC. The real bulk of the metro's major transportation issues did not occur until after its explosive growth and negligence in expanding transportion routes and options.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:59 AM
 
29,538 posts, read 26,581,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
The focus is on the first sections of freeways built

And of course everyone knows the Downtown Connector, built before the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 and the Grady Curve was built to cut Sweet Auburn (then the center of AA commerce) in half.
Seems like another big chunk of the downtown Connector was built to cut Midtown in half.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,594 posts, read 17,782,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Possibly impactful at that time but no more than any other major city. I-35 in Austin was built as a barrier to keep the African American population in East Austin out of downtown. DFW, where do I begin? Same for Chicago and NYC. The real bulk of the metro's major transportation issues did not occur until after its explosive growth and negligence in expanding transportion routes and options.
No one is arguing that it did not happen in other cities. The author used Atlanta as an example
 
Old Yesterday, 12:58 PM
 
2,358 posts, read 922,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
No one is arguing that it did not happen in other cities. The author used Atlanta as an example
Some are arguing that they are singling Atlanta out in this regard and that it's the prime reason for the traffic concerns. While it does contribute to it, it's far from the only reason.
 
Old Yesterday, 02:43 PM
 
540 posts, read 655,680 times
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For example sake, let's say that the white flight had not occurred and that whites had remained in SW Atlanta and South DeKalb, would the situation with Atlanta traffic be that different today? I ask this because as the Atlanta area grew and people moved in from other parts of the south and the rest of the country, they would have to live somewhere, so if blacks who ended up moving into SW Atlanta and South DeKalb in the 1960's had not had the large amount of housing stock available to them when white flight occurred (which Kruse covers in detail in his book), they would have been essentially forced to look at housing further out - whether it was in the close in areas of Cobb or Tucker and the close in areas of Gwinnett. The major way for increased density to have occurred is for higher density in a lot of developed areas which at that time had single family homes on large lots - look at SW Atlanta from the air and you will see a tree canopy which reflects this reality.


They (blacks) would have been a higher percentage of those commuting in during the 1970's, so this begs the question, does the race of the driver of the car make a difference when it comes to congestion? There are hundreds of thousands of blacks driving in to jobs from the suburbs every day. In the big scheme of things in a Metro area of almost 6 million, the black residents of the City of Atlanta (and you can throw in South DeKalb, too for that matter) are a minority of the black population of the Metro area. Therefore to focus so intensely on the areas that experienced the most dramatic white flight in the 1960's is missing the larger picture. Atlanta was going to face traffic challenges as a city which grew most rapidly in the car era after World War Ii.


People forget that the Atlanta area had a street car system which traveled out to the suburbs and all converged at Five Points. The Uncle Rufus line went along Atlanta Rd. to the Square in Marietta. However, service was discontinued in 1947 because too many of the riders had their own cars by that time. Race and white flight had nothing to do with it, (This was before any white flight had begun to any significant extent and certainly not in Cobb) so whatever lack of enthusiasm there may have been for mass transit didn't always have racism as its roots.
 
Old Yesterday, 02:44 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 3,380,574 times
Reputation: 3483
Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
The focus is on the first sections of freeways built

And of course everyone knows the Downtown Connector, built before the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 and the Grady Curve was built to cut Sweet Auburn (then the center of AA commerce) in half.
I don't think anyone is arguing that interstate construction may have divided minority neighborhoods. The focus of the discussion is whether traffic would exist if the interstates weren't racist.
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