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Old 08-16-2019, 08:32 PM
 
15,383 posts, read 27,668,688 times
Reputation: 18856

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Stay on topic of the OP or risk this thread being closed.

 
Old 08-16-2019, 09:45 PM
 
1,502 posts, read 1,674,757 times
Reputation: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
And this research led him to believe what happened in Atlanta wasn't mirrored all around the country? Arjay's comment that whites are moving back in is being mirrored all across the country as well. The trends were nationwide, not isolated to Atlanta.

Write this as an American issue. Don't single out Atlanta as if it were some outlier.
What gave you that idea; all of the deflection and denial in this thread?

Here are direct quotes from the article.

Quote:
In Atlanta, as in dozens of cities across America...
Quote:
As in most American cities in the decades after the Second World War...
Quote:
This was a common practice ... in countless metropolises across the country.
Atlanta is not being "singled out". Atlanta is being presented as an apt example considering that it likely demonstrates the legacy of segregation affecting traffic (the subject of the article) more than any other large city.
 
Old 08-17-2019, 03:16 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,378 posts, read 3,586,631 times
Reputation: 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
San Diego traffic isn't as bad as Atlanta's. I've been there a few times. Its bad though because everyone wants to live as close to the ocean as possible and the water serves as a natural boundary but going west to east is a lot easier than crossing the same direction through ATL.
Yes, it is as bad. I've been there more 'than a few times,' as my office happens to be there. West to east can't be compared to Atlanta, as East there is way more sparsely populated than here and has large expanses of totally undeveloped land. Due to the canyon and Mesa geography it's a North/South oriented Metro, and despite having Commuter rail (with very low ridership) their traffic is every bit as bad as here.

It took an hour and 10 minutes to drive from Sorrento Mesa to Downtown last Friday at 6pm, and the local coworkers riding with me said 'this is normal.' This was on the 805, which is nowhere near the Coast. The large majority of the population can't afford to live 'as close to the ocean as possible' as you claim.

Your bizarre and neverending anti-Atlanta agenda seems to be backfiring, yet again.

Last edited by JMatl; 08-17-2019 at 03:51 AM..
 
Old 08-17-2019, 05:47 AM
 
3,712 posts, read 8,899,511 times
Reputation: 2167
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Yes, it is as bad. I've been there more 'than a few times,' as my office happens to be there. West to east can't be compared to Atlanta, as East there is way more sparsely populated than here and has large expanses of totally undeveloped land. Due to the canyon and Mesa geography it's a North/South oriented Metro, and despite having Commuter rail (with very low ridership) their traffic is every bit as bad as here.

It took an hour and 10 minutes to drive from Sorrento Mesa to Downtown last Friday at 6pm, and the local coworkers riding with me said 'this is normal.' This was on the 805, which is nowhere near the Coast. The large majority of the population can't afford to live 'as close to the ocean as possible' as you claim.

Your bizarre and neverending anti-Atlanta agenda seems to be backfiring, yet again.
It was actually worse than Atlanta when I was living there, but that was like 15 years ago. I'm sure it hasn't gotten better there since then either.
 
Old 08-17-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,648 posts, read 10,167,554 times
Reputation: 5998
Quote:
Originally Posted by J2rescue View Post
What gave you that idea; all of the deflection and denial in this thread?

Here are direct quotes from the article.






Atlanta is not being "singled out". Atlanta is being presented as an apt example considering that it likely demonstrates the legacy of segregation affecting traffic (the subject of the article) more than any other large city.
In other words, Atlanta is being "singled out."
 
Old 08-17-2019, 02:00 PM
 
2,356 posts, read 922,359 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Yes, it is as bad. I've been there more 'than a few times,' as my office happens to be there. West to east can't be compared to Atlanta, as East there is way more sparsely populated than here and has large expanses of totally undeveloped land. Due to the canyon and Mesa geography it's a North/South oriented Metro, and despite having Commuter rail (with very low ridership) their traffic is every bit as bad as here.

It took an hour and 10 minutes to drive from Sorrento Mesa to Downtown last Friday at 6pm, and the local coworkers riding with me said 'this is normal.' This was on the 805, which is nowhere near the Coast. The large majority of the population can't afford to live 'as close to the ocean as possible' as you claim.

Your bizarre and neverending anti-Atlanta agenda seems to be backfiring, yet again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
It was actually worse than Atlanta when I was living there, but that was like 15 years ago. I'm sure it hasn't gotten better there since then either.
For what it is worth I personally do not see dwellers in San Diego as very apt toward mass-transit given the kind of citizens it seems to attract. With the average cost of a SFH being over $1 mill, most people who live there are either military, retired or have a crapton of money... few of those are your average joe commuters - that stated transit - probably does not appeal to them as easily as it would on the eastern board - thus you get more drivers.

I have visited San Diego a few times but not during peak hours so I haven't spent any time in its rush hour and usually stayed in the suburban areas. I 'personally' would believe San Diego's core and areas around its core to be MUCH worse than its suburbs due to the amount of activity around those areas, and proximity to the beach...

however... statistically speaking...
San Diego ranked 40th most congested city in the U.S. - San Diego, CA's Scorecard Report
Atlanta ranked 11th ... Atlanta, GA's Scorecard Report

That stated once again however, there are far less people inhabiting (or could even dream to dwell) in San Diego.

About 60ish miles north however is where the real traffic fun begins (Los Angeles metro) -- which is easily much worse than Atlanta.

That stated again - While the freeways in the Pacific and Southwest region are extremely convenient - they ARE overall very limited in terms of effectiveness with dealing with high volumes of commuters - sophisticated and feasible transit is the right direction to go with the Atlanta metro rather than piling layers and layers of freeways as the metro grows (both outward and more dense at the same time) those nodes in time become limited as per how many commuters they can serve - the other issue is the term 'freeway' is a past tense term. Very few metro's are building 'freeways' - most of them are now building 'Toll Roads' or 'Toll Lanes' - and contrary to popular belief, they are NOT intended to deliver masses of commuters - they are intended to promote reliable speeds for a price, sometimes a pretty expensive one. (this is why Texas toll roads often have speed limits ranging from 75 to 85 MPH) The other issue is, some states are literally selling their souls to build them. While the private funding organization will front the fee - the state has to promise no competing nodes of transportation along its corridor (much like the I-75 NW corridor's original proposal) and also - alot of these roads will be forever tolled, and some contract agreements leased out for 75 to 100 years... While the roads DO make enough money for necessary maintenance or even complete replacements when their life expectancy is over, the length of time their contract is employed for is VERY shortsighted when comparing to how quickly the areas around them will grow and transit necessities around those areas are needed in conjuction on top of which - what the status of automobiles will even become in a distance so far out.

In short, the toll roads today are a very shortsighted solution and cannot fathomly accomodate exponential population growth when it occurs and it is this reason that I would rather see billions invested in rail rather than toll lanes or toll roads.. ..with the exception of the outer perimeter however - for industrial purposes - trucks really do need a better bypass.

Last edited by Need4Camaro; 08-17-2019 at 02:36 PM..
 
Old 08-17-2019, 02:49 PM
 
15,383 posts, read 27,668,688 times
Reputation: 18856
One other reminder: This subforums posts are to be regarding Atlanta.
 
Old 08-20-2019, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
510 posts, read 352,920 times
Reputation: 438
Kruse said all that to say this:


Quote:
In the end, Atlanta's traffic is at a standstill because its attitude about transit is at a standstill, too. Fifty years after its Interstates were set down with an eye to segregation and its rapid-transit system was stunted by white flight, the city is still stalled in the past.

He can't make up his mind. Is Atlanta's awful traffic due to segregation or a lack of public transportation?
 
Old 08-20-2019, 07:02 PM
 
10,740 posts, read 7,625,026 times
Reputation: 3336
Quote:
Originally Posted by IntentionsRGood View Post
He can't make up his mind. Is Atlanta's awful traffic due to segregation or a lack of public transportation?

The lack of support for public transit in the US is intertwined with segregation and racism. Have you not heard the "alternate" abbreviations for "M.A.R.T.A."?
 
Old 08-20-2019, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
510 posts, read 352,920 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsvh View Post
The lack of support for public transit in the US is intertwined with segregation and racism. Have you not heard the "alternate" abbreviations for "M.A.R.T.A."?

The article is about Atlanta's segregationist history. And yes, I heard the ignorant acronym alternative for MARTA.
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