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Old 08-29-2019, 01:44 PM
 
177 posts, read 103,921 times
Reputation: 338

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citykid3785 View Post
I don't doubt that generally speaking the closer in to the city center you go, the more expensive the housing (with plenty of individual exceptions based on crime, infrastructure, schools, etc.).

But it would be false to say that all desire this, AND you get more for your money like the post implied. In fact, that's what curbs the demand.......you get LESS for your money. That may be a good tradeoff for an individual, but to imply you get more or the same for your money is silly. One only has to look at avg price/sqf. to see that that is false.


You get less for your money in terms of how much house you get, but living in the city I feel that you gain a lot of economic, cultural, and health benefits. I've been thinking recently, a child growing up in a 2 bedroom condo in midtown would have the art museums and the fox theater basically at their doorsteps, and kids in the suburbs would have...parks? Kids may not appreciate being taken to plays or musicals, but exposing kids to that type of stuff early on matters in their development. Exposing them to different people, places, ideas, and even foods will teaching them to appreciate diversity. The city just has more of those types of amenities. The suburbs off a lot of size, safety, and "good" schools, but you don't have all of the amenities of the city at your doorstep.

 
Old 08-29-2019, 02:04 PM
 
3,895 posts, read 1,000,794 times
Reputation: 4460
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
This. White college-educated households without children are the fastest growing population segment of high density US cities (NYC, SF, DC, Seattle, etc.). The population of households with school-age children has been declining for twenty years in those same cities. In fact, high density US cities are experiencing a declining birth rate faster than the country as a whole. The kind of boutique city that city fetishists so desire is mostly viewed as profoundly challenging by families with children, especially those with school-age children, for all but the absolutely most affluent households.

Moreover, a large portion of middle-class Europeans live in suburbs too for many of the same basic reasons as Americans, starting the price of real estate. Population growth in Euro metro areas has been decidedly outside of core urban areas for decades.
Yes, Europe has been experiencing the issue with an increasing number of 3-generation households for some time. Not a problem I strive to have one day.

In the US, you have people modifying their wants and goals just to be able to afford a detached home. This means delaying or deciding completely against a succeeding generation. Daycare prices in some high CoL areas are extortionate and rival private college tuition, just to find schools with a decent reputation, not rife with negligence or other abuse. Don't like that? What other choices do residents have? One spouse not work? Okay that's $100k less they're making.

So many households belong to DINKs (dual-income, no kids) that there are no more advantages, only disadvantages.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 02:50 PM
 
553 posts, read 417,811 times
Reputation: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
You get less for your money in terms of how much house you get, but living in the city I feel that you gain a lot of economic, cultural, and health benefits. I've been thinking recently, a child growing up in a 2 bedroom condo in midtown would have the art museums and the fox theater basically at their doorsteps, and kids in the suburbs would have...parks? Kids may not appreciate being taken to plays or musicals, but exposing kids to that type of stuff early on matters in their development. Exposing them to different people, places, ideas, and even foods will teaching them to appreciate diversity. The city just has more of those types of amenities. The suburbs off a lot of size, safety, and "good" schools, but you don't have all of the amenities of the city at your doorstep.
The suburbs are significantly more racially diverse than Atlanta and people tend to segregate themselves in both places anyway. Nonetheless, suburban kids have a much higher probability of attending racially and/or economically integrated schools than in the city. Atlanta schools are extremely segregated. Decatur is the second whitest and least impoverished school district in the metro and will soon enough be the whitest. And ... umm ... you can take your kids to do all the other things you mentioned even if you live in the burbs. How do you think all of those places remain open? They arenít just patronized by city residents.

Health benefits are a function of income not location. Forsyth has the healthiest population in Georgia. It also has the highest median income.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 04:47 PM
 
5,284 posts, read 3,399,091 times
Reputation: 3506
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
You get less for your money in terms of how much house you get, but living in the city I feel that you gain a lot of economic, cultural, and health benefits. I've been thinking recently, a child growing up in a 2 bedroom condo in midtown would have the art museums and the fox theater basically at their doorsteps, and kids in the suburbs would have...parks? Kids may not appreciate being taken to plays or musicals, but exposing kids to that type of stuff early on matters in their development. Exposing them to different people, places, ideas, and even foods will teaching them to appreciate diversity. The city just has more of those types of amenities. The suburbs off a lot of size, safety, and "good" schools, but you don't have all of the amenities of the city at your doorstep.
It's not like the Fox has a noon-stop roster of kids' shows or shows that kids would have any interest in seeing. And, believe it or not, people from the suburbs can come in and see shows there. It does actually happen. And, art museums...that's like, what...twice a year that anyone would take their kids to an art museum?

You can still expose your kids to plenty, even if you live in the suburbs. Who actually spends every single day pushing the boundaries of exploring diversity? Only hipsters and radical urbanists really. The suburbs offer plenty of things to do with kids that expose them to all sorts of things. The city is not some magical wonderland.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 04:54 PM
 
3,815 posts, read 1,327,266 times
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Talk about a timely article given the subject of discussion.

It focuses on Millennial buyers, but it goes into detail about the reasons why this upcoming recession won't be like the last recession for home prices.

https://www.curbed.com/2019/8/29/208...ebuying-prices
 
Old 08-29-2019, 05:59 PM
 
177 posts, read 103,921 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
It's not like the Fox has a noon-stop roster of kids' shows or shows that kids would have any interest in seeing. And, believe it or not, people from the suburbs can come in and see shows there. It does actually happen. And, art museums...that's like, what...twice a year that anyone would take their kids to an art museum?

You can still expose your kids to plenty, even if you live in the suburbs. .

Concerts? Festivals? Diverse high-end dining? Nightlife for young singles? The burbs just don't have the amenities. To each their own, but don't act as if there is as much to do in the burbs as there is in the city.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 06:04 PM
 
177 posts, read 103,921 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by BR Valentine View Post
The suburbs are significantly more racially diverse than Atlanta.

.

I wanna say, no. Just no. I guess it depends on what suburb you are talking about but generally, no.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 09:40 PM
 
2,117 posts, read 1,841,198 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
You get less for your money in terms of how much house you get, but living in the city I feel that you gain a lot of economic, cultural, and health benefits. I've been thinking recently, a child growing up in a 2 bedroom condo in midtown would have the art museums and the fox theater basically at their doorsteps, and kids in the suburbs would have...parks? Kids may not appreciate being taken to plays or musicals, but exposing kids to that type of stuff early on matters in their development. Exposing them to different people, places, ideas, and even foods will teaching them to appreciate diversity. The city just has more of those types of amenities. The suburbs off a lot of size, safety, and "good" schools, but you don't have all of the amenities of the city at your doorstep.
Easily the greatest advantage of living in the city for my children is that my wife and I have two extra hours in the day to spend with them. Compared to that, any other advantage is just a bonus, and any disadvantages are just a minor nuisance.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 10:05 PM
 
8,437 posts, read 10,414,295 times
Reputation: 6571
Oh, boy, this discussion again. Alright... well, here goes....

Quote:
I've been thinking recently, a child growing up in a 2 bedroom condo in midtown would have the art museums and the fox theater basically at their doorsteps, and kids in the suburbs would have...parks?
I'm not going to say your entire argument is incorrect, but you sure picked strange points to try to make it. Exactly how often do you think a kid, or really any person, is going to wander into the Fox Theater for an event or go to the Woodruff Art Center? As opposed to a park, which kids pretty much use every single day? I think anybody would say easy access to parks is much more important than access to a theater or museum. However, even that argument is pretty terrible because do we know suburban kids have better access to parks? Depends on which suburb you live in, and which part of the city you're talking about.

Quote:
Concerts? Festivals? Diverse high-end dining? Nightlife for young singles? The burbs just don't have the amenities.
And these benefit kids... how, exactly? This stuff is great for adults, but if we're talking about kids, many suburbs actually have way more concerts and festivals geared toward them than most intown neighborhoods.

Quote:
I wanna say, no. Just no. I guess it depends on what suburb you are talking about but generally, no.
Welp, you can wanna say no as much as you like, but the fact remains most suburbs in Atlanta are more diverse than most intown neighborhoods. And not by a little. The city is WAAAAYYYY more economically segregated, and that translates directly to more segregation on just about every front. This isn't difficult to prove. You can visualize it using the New York Times map the census tool.

Quote:
Easily the greatest advantage of living in the city for my children is that my wife and I have two extra hours in the day to spend with them.
Now, that is a totally legit argument to make and impossible, or at least foolish, to argue against.
 
Old 08-29-2019, 10:08 PM
 
2,117 posts, read 1,841,198 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgpremed13 View Post
Concerts? Festivals? Diverse high-end dining? Nightlife for young singles? The burbs just don't have the amenities. To each their own, but don't act as if there is as much to do in the burbs as there is in the city.
Those aren’t exactly essential amenities for raising kids—which is what the conversation was about. As far as a child’s time goes, most of a child’s enrichment comes from doing, learning to play an instrument, creating their own art, being in a school play, playing outside with friends, playing a sport, learning at school, baking a cake, visiting new places and people. None of those things are unique to the city, many are more expensive or difficult in the city, and paying for city life actually limits the money that can be spent on a child’s enrichment. For most of the more passive types of enrichment, occasionally visiting the city is sufficient.
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