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Old 09-02-2019, 09:49 PM
 
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ATL edging toward Vision Zero, a policy of no deaths when vehicles strike humans | Saporta Report

Quote:
The job posting for Atlanta’s first transportation commissioner calls for experience with implementing Vision Zero, a mobility policy that includes reducing vehicular speed on city streets in order to improve safety for folks not in vehicles.

Atlanta has not formally adopted Vision Zero. But Vision Zero is cited by name on the job posting and is increasingly relevant as Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms’ administration grapples with issues including:
  • Deadly crashes involving electric scooters struck by vehicles;
  • Rising tension on the Atlanta BeltLine among those competing for space to safely walk, jog, cycle, skate, ride a scooter;
  • A proposed revision of traffic patterns for pedestrians and vehicles in the central business district, home of the city’s convention industry;
  • “Smart Cities” technology that aims to create a mobility bubble around vehicles and pedestrians along street corridors, including a pilot program on North Avenue;
  • Legacy industrial areas that rely on truck traffic even as they are being retrofitted as places to live, work and play.
Atlanta has stopped accepting applications for the commissioner’s position. The commissioner is to oversee a Department of Transportation the Atlanta City Council voted in June establish. The DOT is to be devised with public input gathered in a community engagement process, and the department is to start work in late 2020, according to the legislation adopted by council

The job posting for Atlanta’s DOT commissioner lists experience with Vision Zero as fifth of 10 items cited on a segment of the wish list titled, Ideal Candidate. The candidate is to have:
Peachtree, Midtown

“Demonstrated commitment to championing safety in transportation planning with a preference for candidates with experience implementing a Vision Zero Policy.”

About 40 U.S. cities have adopted Vision Zero, including the coastal anchors of New York and Boston, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Smaller cities that support Vision Zero include Austin, Boulder, Charlotte – and Macon.

Macon embraced Vision Zero as part of the effort that started in 2015 to increase pedestrian safety. The website doesn’t make clear any measures that have been implemented beyond the fundamental step of putting pedestrian safety at the center of transportation planning.

...
Here is hoping Atlanta adopts a "Vision Zero" plan and funds & acts on it!

Last edited by jsvh; 09-02-2019 at 10:33 PM..
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:06 AM
 
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Here's a map of pedestrian deaths in the ATL from 2013. (Click on the dots for more detail regarding each incident).

Wonder if this would generally correspond to the problem areas today?


https://www.ajc.com/news/pedestrian-fatalities/
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
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City of Atlanta adopted Cycle Atlanta Plans and ATP, but has not implemented either. What will Vision Zero do other than look good on paper?
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:54 AM
 
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I can understand wanting to curb pedestrian deaths on urban streets, but looking at arjay's map, there really aren't many pedestrian deaths on these roads.

I mean...one where a driver accidentally swerves onto a sidewalk to avoid another car? That can happen regardless of any Vision Zero. Someone who fell onto a street and was hit while lying down? That's going to happen anyway.

Those are the only pedestrian deaths I see in downtown, midtown, or Buckhead.

Judging by this map, I'd argue the city of Atlanta doesn't have a problem with pedestrian deaths.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,634 posts, read 17,857,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLTJL View Post
I can understand wanting to curb pedestrian deaths on urban streets, but looking at arjay's map, there really aren't many pedestrian deaths on these roads.

I mean...one where a driver accidentally swerves onto a sidewalk to avoid another car? That can happen regardless of any Vision Zero. Someone who fell onto a street and was hit while lying down? That's going to happen anyway.

Those are the only pedestrian deaths I see in downtown, midtown, or Buckhead.

Judging by this map, I'd argue the city of Atlanta doesn't have a problem with pedestrian deaths.
That's 2013 data.
See City of Atlanta's High Injury Network
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:17 AM
 
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We have such a long way to go. Every time I travel I am reminded of how we are such a car-centric city that it will take dramatic change just to achieve average walkability.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:30 AM
 
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Thanks, cq. Good update.

I wonder how the numbers compare to those outside the city limits?
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:39 AM
 
5,313 posts, read 3,410,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Here's a map of pedestrian deaths in the ATL from 2013. (Click on the dots for more detail regarding each incident).

Wonder if this would generally correspond to the problem areas today?


https://www.ajc.com/news/pedestrian-fatalities/
I highly suggest people click on the dots and read the accompanying stories. It is shocking how many of the deaths are related to people walking in the middle of the interstate. Many of the others appear to be at night with people not taking any precautions. Some aren't even pedestrian/vehicle accidents, so I'm not sure why they are included (a backhoe at a construction site?).

Quote:
Originally Posted by cqholt View Post
That's 2013 data.
See City of Atlanta's High Injury Network
I saw a recent map kind of like this which designated dangerous intersections. It designated a few small intersections along Moore's Mill, even though I have never seen a single emergency vehicle, a singe fender-bender, or any other sign of an issue in 14 years of using that road on a nearly-daily basis. However, it did not designate the intersection in front of our neighborhood, which has seen a fair amount of crashes and pedestrian issues (and where the city has refused to install a traffic signal after 13 years of begging by the neighborhood.

I would prefer to see the actual data, rather than work off a "high injury network" map. For example, looking at the map, is the entire length of Hollowell really a high-injury corridor? Is the entire length of MLK?

But, there's something else to look at here. I think we can all agree that there is decidedly more traffic in the northern and eastern parts of the city, yet those are the ones with the least amount of pedestrian issues.

This is not to say it's all safe and we don't need to do anything.
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Old 09-03-2019, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood
23,634 posts, read 17,857,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
I would prefer to see the actual data, rather than work off a "high injury network" map. For example, looking at the map, is the entire length of Hollowell really a high-injury corridor? Is the entire length of MLK?

But, there's something else to look at here. I think we can all agree that there is decidedly more traffic in the northern and eastern parts of the city, yet those are the ones with the least amount of pedestrian issues.

This is not to say it's all safe and we don't need to do anything.
There is a difference between injury crashes and what people consider fender-benders.
Safer Streets section of the ATP, which goes into depth on the methodology, etc.
https://transportationplanatl.blob.c...er_Streets.pdf
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Old Today, 05:04 PM
 
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Reducing traffic violence reduces crime. Who would have guessed safer streets results in... safer streets? Yet another reason for a "Vision Zero" plan here in Atlanta:

Want to Make Your City Safe? The Data Points To Prioritizing 'Vision Zero' To Cut Crime | Forbes
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