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Old 05-05-2008, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Montgomery County, MD
293 posts, read 345,075 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
I think I said before that I never wanted to live in Atlanta. I've always seen it as the most expensive place in Christendom. But somehow I got the impression that at least the salaries kept up with the cost of living. I'm quickly discovering that this is a major misnomer.

We're having to cancel our family insurance coverage because it costs roughly 1/4 of my husband's salary!!! Around here, family coverage for one child is usually double the single person's coverage--NOT EIGHT TIMES AS MUCH!!! WTF???!!! So now I have a three-year-old with no health insurance coverage. I can't imagine anything more frightening. That's what terrified me about my husband losing his job in the first place.

Most of the jobs I've applied for thus far pay substantially less than I was paid when I worked before, and I had better benefits. Plus, I'll probably have to fork over money for daycare or pre-school, all of which is crazy expensive as well. I just don't see anything in our future but bankruptcy. Which is the reason I didn't want to move there in the first place. All of my friends who moved to Atlanta in the 90s left a decade later because of the outrageous cost of living. It's just depressing as hell that my husband couldn't find a job elsewhere.

I know I'm exhausted and hysterical, but honest to God if we hadn't already signed the contracts I'd so not be making this move.

...if you think that Atlanta is bad be glad you do not live in the metro DC area...
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Old 05-05-2008, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
2,384 posts, read 3,902,190 times
Reputation: 1076
I am so sorry that you are going throught the insurance issue! I know how hard it can be to provide even the necessities for your children. That said, it will get better and you have to have some faith in the idea that it only gets better and that everything happens for a reason.
Good luck and you should check into some of these programs that others on here have referred to.

DVCGAL
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Old 05-06-2008, 07:37 AM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,112 posts, read 20,393,381 times
Reputation: 4641
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyRainyDay View Post
Up north of us in my homeland, Canada, life expectancy is higher and infant mortality lower than in the US.

There are no copays, deductibles, exclusions or lifetime limits. It's all free.

Of course, Canadian medical care is not really free. Canadians prefer to have a single-payer insurance system, funded through taxes, that covers everyone. It's not perfect, but it's pretty darned great compared to what we have here.
There's a good reason they're able to do this, too. Ever seen the paperwork involved if you want to become a Canadian citizen, or even for that matter stay up there and work a while? You can't just walk across the lines and use their health care system then walk out without paying (which cough cough, seems to be our new national pasttime here). They keep it under control (and sell us cheap prescriptions for extra money). LOL But, that's another topic.

The OP does sound like a candidate for that Peachcare program, but look into it quickly, as they may put caps on it at some point or change the standards due to budget concerns. But if you're already in it, it shouldn't effect you, so apply as soon as you can.
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:01 AM
 
2,642 posts, read 5,086,689 times
Reputation: 541
Here is a shining example of what public assistance is for - to help people get on their feet and keep from going under.

Roslyn, when I moved to Georgia I was just out of grad school with a one-year old. My husband was starting a PhD program. I didn't have a job. We had noooooooooo money. I used Peachcare for the first several months we were here until I got a job that luckily had affordable insurance.

Before we moved here both my husband and I were grad students in Louisiana living on a small stipend (that we had to pay tuition out of) and student loans and when I unexpectedly became pregnant I had to use Medicaid and WIC.

So, I used public assistance for 2 years. I've since paid it back in spades (at the time my mom told me not to feel bad and think of it as using the taxes she and my dad had paid).

You'll always run into people who will be angry that you used it (you made this CHOICE so why do I have to pay for it?!?!) but don't sweat them. I think the bulk of Americans understand how times can get tough and you can't prepare for everything. I just wanted to address that subject in case you were stressing over it....

So, ask for help and keep looking for better opportunities. Things will look up!
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Powell, OH
886 posts, read 1,795,932 times
Reputation: 405
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyRainyDay View Post
Of course, Canadian medical care is not really free. Canadians prefer to have a single-payer insurance system, funded through taxes, that covers everyone. It's not perfect, but it's pretty darned great compared to what we have here.
Hang in there Roslyn - alot of people are having a tough time of it. We all have these days...

As for the Canadian healthcare comment - I wanted to added something....

A few few years back, DH was offered a job in Canada. It was a promotion/lateral move with a Fortune 100 company. In talks with everyone at HQ trying to decide to take the jump or not, the benefits department actually scared us away from Canada & its heathcare system. The one thing they constantly kept stressing is that we were allowed to return to US for any/all of our healthcare needs. Even though they were paying for our benefits in Canada, our benefits were paid in the US as well. Needless to say, we didn't go. This was just one of a couple of reasons, but the healthcare questions certainly spelled it out for us.

Again, hope the OP finds the resources she needs. Things will get better.
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:13 AM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,112 posts, read 20,393,381 times
Reputation: 4641
Quote:
Originally Posted by plessthanpointohfive View Post
Before we moved here both my husband and I were grad students in Louisiana living on a small stipend (that we had to pay tuition out of) and student loans and when I unexpectedly became pregnant I had to use Medicaid and WIC.
Well, that ONE part about the "unexpectedly became pregnant" part when you're poor. Um - people know how and where babies come from (and how to avoid having them). LOL (that's meant in humor toward you, so don't get riled up). Via education, there are no "accidental" pregnancies" these days - people know how NOT to make a baby if they try. double -


Quote:
Originally Posted by plessthanpointohfive View Post
You'll always run into people who will be angry that you used it (you made this CHOICE so why do I have to pay for it?!?!) but don't sweat them. I think the bulk of Americans understand how times can get tough and you can't prepare for everything. I just wanted to address that subject in case you were stressing over it....
I think most people only get ticked when they see or hear comments from people that indicate they LIVE on the system for long periods of time. That actually doesn't happen THAT often, though.

Most of us pay into it, and we're all entitled to use it if we need to in order to get back on our feet, and SHOULD use it if it's needed. After all, anyone who has ever paid taxes owns part of this system.

The thing for the OP will be to find the right info to make sure the she gets everything she can qualify for, and then to use it to her advantage so that it keeps them comfortably afloat until she and her husband get settled into the area, and both get jobs with checks coming in regularly. Then, she (hopefully) releases those benefits and begins to pay into them instead, so others who are in real need at the time can use them, and it goes from there to those who need it. Peachcare is in the right direction, and of course there will be other programs as well that the adults can use.
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:18 AM
 
2,642 posts, read 5,086,689 times
Reputation: 541
Greg, you're right about getting knocked up. However, birth control pills fail and so do condoms and husbands wont' tolerate abstinance within marriage...neither will a lot of wives!

We were married 3 years when I got knocked up. Our plan was to wait until about a year ago. But you know what they say about plans...
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:56 AM
 
Location: East Cobb
2,205 posts, read 4,020,041 times
Reputation: 854
Default Canadian stuff

Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
There's a good reason they're able to do this, too. Ever seen the paperwork involved if you want to become a Canadian citizen, or even for that matter stay up there and work a while? You can't just walk across the lines and use their health care system then walk out without paying (which cough cough, seems to be our new national pasttime here). They keep it under control (and sell us cheap prescriptions for extra money). LOL But, that's another topic.
I infer that, like most US citizens, you have no idea of the hoops people have to jump through in order to work legally in the US. And why should you? However, let me assure you from first-hand experience, Canadian immigration is so much easier, there's no comparison. However, the US is the glamor destination, so the system here is overwhelmed.

Regarding illegal immigrants, Canadian taxpayers end up paying for their healthcare, same as in the US. However, it's proportionately less of a burden in Canada, because Canada doesn't have a land border with Mexico.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiGal View Post
As for the Canadian healthcare comment - I wanted to added something....

A few few years back, DH was offered a job in Canada. It was a promotion/lateral move with a Fortune 100 company. In talks with everyone at HQ trying to decide to take the jump or not, the benefits department actually scared us away from Canada & its heathcare system. The one thing they constantly kept stressing is that we were allowed to return to US for any/all of our healthcare needs. Even though they were paying for our benefits in Canada, our benefits were paid in the US as well. Needless to say, we didn't go. This was just one of a couple of reasons, but the healthcare questions certainly spelled it out for us.
What it spelled out, Gemini, is that the folks in your company's benefits department shared some misconceptions that seem commonplace in the US. Canada is a first-world country with better healthcare outcomes than the US. However, many Americans imagine that health care in all other countries, including Canada, is on the level of some poor country in the third world. It's simply bizarre. If Canadian healthcare is inferior, why do Canadians live longer than Americans? They have the same lifestyles and pretty much the same genes as Americans. I fear Americans' beliefs that Canadian healthcare is inferior ultimately stem from self-serving propaganda put about by the US health insurance industry.

Years ago, when my husband and I were young and fit, we went on a short hike near Banff, in the Canadian Rockies, and encountered a middle-aged couple from Seattle. The woman had just broken her ankle. My husband helped her husband carry her the mile or so down a steep trail to their car. The woman was a nurse (so she was pretty confident in her self-diagnosis of a broken ankle). All the way down the trail, she kept bemoaning that this had happened outside the US, and speculating that if she could just get her ankle "roughly splinted" at the hospital in Banff, then they could go straight home to the US so that it could be "properly seen to" by "real doctors". My husband said he was tempted to drop her! Although they asked our address and sent us a nice fruit basket at Christmas, which was unnecessary of course, but very gracious of them. Anyway, the notion that only the US has "real doctors" is pretty engrained among Americans, I'm afraid.
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Old 05-06-2008, 01:59 PM
 
42 posts, read 94,471 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyRainyDay View Post
Up north of us in my homeland, Canada, life expectancy is higher and infant mortality lower than in the US. When you visit the doctor and learn that you need some tests, and to see a specialist, you worry about your health, and whether to prefer Dr. X or Dr. Y, but you never think about the cost. There are no copays, deductibles, exclusions or lifetime limits. It's all free.

Of course, Canadian medical care is not really free. Canadians prefer to have a single-payer insurance system, funded through taxes, that covers everyone. It's not perfect, but it's pretty darned great compared to what we have here.

By the way, a working Canadian woman who has a baby gets a year of maternity leave. Europeans get even more generous benefits. This probably seems like a shocking thing to say (or type), but by the standards of other western countries, the US is just not a family-friendly society. Business comes first here, not families.

Anyway, this is a diversion from Roslyn's problems. We're rooting and praying for you, Roslyn!
The problem with socialized health care is that it looks good on paper because everyone receives better general care, but in terms of specialized care, the wait times and availability of specialized and complex procedures suffers. It's great for the masses and less great for the cancer patients.
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Old 05-06-2008, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Taunton, MA
104 posts, read 174,200 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
I think I said before that I never wanted to live in Atlanta. I've always seen it as the most expensive place in Christendom. But somehow I got the impression that at least the salaries kept up with the cost of living. I'm quickly discovering that this is a major misnomer.

We're having to cancel our family insurance coverage because it costs roughly 1/4 of my husband's salary!!! Around here, family coverage for one child is usually double the single person's coverage--NOT EIGHT TIMES AS MUCH!!! WTF???!!! So now I have a three-year-old with no health insurance coverage. I can't imagine anything more frightening. That's what terrified me about my husband losing his job in the first place.

Most of the jobs I've applied for thus far pay substantially less than I was paid when I worked before, and I had better benefits. Plus, I'll probably have to fork over money for daycare or pre-school, all of which is crazy expensive as well. I just don't see anything in our future but bankruptcy. Which is the reason I didn't want to move there in the first place. All of my friends who moved to Atlanta in the 90s left a decade later because of the outrageous cost of living. It's just depressing as hell that my husband couldn't find a job elsewhere.

I know I'm exhausted and hysterical, but honest to God if we hadn't already signed the contracts I'd so not be making this move.



Not to mention when millions of people move to you city in a decade or two dont think for a second you can sustain that without major infrastructure challenges which will only be fixed through higher taxes and fees.

I left Atlanta after 7 years, not because I didnt like Atlanta, but because I didnt like the horrendous traffic! The poor air quality, And the looming water and sewer problems sure to be a major drain on the budget. Not to mention I think a family plan for healthcare was hitting like 800 bucks.

I packed it up and went back home. After all... we have plenty of infrastructure even if it is getting old, and universal healthcare.

Good luck!
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