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Old 05-03-2012, 11:05 AM
 
3 posts, read 11,969 times
Reputation: 12

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Quote:
Originally Posted by socaldiver View Post
I'm under contract for a home with Polybutylene Plumbing in Roswell, GA. A few people are telling me to ask the sellers to pay to have the home repiped with copper. I don't think it's a big deal. Most of the homes that I was looking at had that kind of plumbing. It can't be that bad if so many people have that type of plumbing.

What does everyone think?
Unless you see visible leak, there is no way to check the questionable piping by simply looking at the outside of the pipe. The pipe deteriorates from the inside out from chlorine additives used in the treatment of some City Water areas.

It really is a matter of peace of mind. If you feel like taking the gamble that it will not fail, than it's not an issue. If you are not the gambling type, replace it with a known standard.

Copper is the industry standard for a reason...it's time proven (In the USA since the late 1920's), strong, recyclable, and a natural material.
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Old 05-03-2012, 11:41 AM
 
7,688 posts, read 9,532,497 times
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I would think that if there is no specific problem and you ask the homeowner to replace the pipes before you buy the house, they are going to laugh in your face.

Every seller is different, and it might depend on how motivated they are. I would think that a more reasonable solution would be to simply ask for a modest allowance to replace the pipes yourself.

My house had some water vapor between the window panes and my inspector recommended having them replaced. I was a new buyer and didn't know any better, so I asked for them to be replaced. The seller practically laughed at me and knocked $500 off the asking price, to which I said fine. Of course, replacing all the windows will cost thousands of dollars, but it's pretty much not necessary.

You can pretty much pick apart any house and demand thousands of dollars worth of fixes, but most sellers aren't going to accomodate that unless every buyer is asking for the same thing. I asked about that PVC piping on my house, too, but I don't know that I would have actually expected the seller to rip it all out and replace it before I bought the house. I got lucky and have copper pipes in the house, but it is extremely likely that I have PVC from the water main to the house itself (there's no way to know without digging a hole and looking). So I know that some day that might fail and I'll have to have the yard dug up, but since hot water doesn't travel through that pipe, it's less likely to be a problem.

Since this is an old post, I'm sure the issue has long been resolved, but my guess is a seller would be more likely to simply pass on your offer and wait for a buyer who isn't that concerned than he is to spend the money to replace all the pipes.
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
7,876 posts, read 12,889,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimplePlumber View Post
Unless you see visible leak, there is no way to check the questionable piping by simply looking at the outside of the pipe. The pipe deteriorates from the inside out from chlorine additives used in the treatment of some City Water areas.

It really is a matter of peace of mind. If you feel like taking the gamble that it will not fail, than it's not an issue. If you are not the gambling type, replace it with a known standard.

Copper is the industry standard for a reason...it's time proven (In the USA since the late 1920's), strong, recyclable, and a natural material.
How about a re-plumb with PEX ? Certainly would cut down on the cost, possibly satisfying both parties in the transaction.
PEX vs. Copper Piping | Advantages and Disadvantages of PEX Piping and Copper Piping - PlumbingNetworks.com

Assuming, of course, that PEX meets local code.
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Old 05-04-2012, 10:59 AM
 
3 posts, read 11,969 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10scoachrick View Post
How about a re-plumb with PEX ? Certainly would cut down on the cost, possibly satisfying both parties in the transaction.
PEX vs. Copper Piping | Advantages and Disadvantages of PEX Piping and Copper Piping - PlumbingNetworks.com

Assuming, of course, that PEX meets local code.
I intentionally limited the amount of information on my first post as to not derail the thread into a pex/copper debate...but since you asked...

On the link you provided, the comparisons made between Pex and copper are not truly comparisons, since the majority of the Pex advantages listed can also be applied to copper also.

This is cut and pasted directly from the link above. My additions are in ().

Advantages of PEX:
Adaptable and easy-to-use plumbing system. (also copper)
Can be used with hot and cold water. (also copper)
Can also be used with metal and PVC piping. (also copper)
PEX has fewer fittings, making it faster to install and with less of a chance to leak. (you may save a few 90 degree turns, but you need to provide special support brackets at each of those turns, so what do you really save? In addition, the actual connections to the fixtures require more fittings than copper)
PEX is more burst-resistant due to its flexibility to expand and contract. (moot point; it takes roughly 4,000psi to burst a piece of 1/2" Type L copper and your water heater relief valve blows off at 150psi)
It has a shutoff valve at each supply line, making it more convenient for you when you have to get repairs done. (this is only accurate if you "home run" the entire household, requiring an extraordinary amount of piping in the walls...and is moot anyway, since all fixtures are required to have shutoff valves, regardless of what type of pipe used)
PEX can have a pressure balanced system. (also copper)
Since it is flexible, the pipes can be bent around most corners and usually won't need a coupling or fitting. (redundant with fewer fittings above)

Disadvantages of PEX:
It cannot be used outside. (U.V. light breaks down the plastic)
Cannot be recycled, due to its shorter life use. (it is actually not recyclable due to its type of plastic, so it ends up in landfills)
It provides an impermeable membrane that may allow the possibility of water contamination. (I don't understand this...as impermeable implies nothing can get through it)
The pipes may be damaged if left outside for a long period of time. (I assume they are referring to a distributor leaving their stock of Pex outside before you buy it where UV damage could have occurred and you wouldn't have known it)

I could go on...but this isn't meant to be a pex/copper discussion.

There are a lot of sites out there with misinformation. It's best to just go directly to the manufacturers websites and do your own research on the products.
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Old 05-04-2012, 11:33 AM
 
2,325 posts, read 3,550,134 times
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My house (entire neighborhood) was built with polybutylene pipes - Most homes have been replummed by now.

Absolutely do not move into a house that has not been refitted. It is not a matter of if but when the pipes will fail.

I was lucky in that mt original break was very minor, my handyman fixed it. When I saw the next small break, I took action to replummed the entire house.

Some of my neighbors were not so lucky, they went from no breaks to major damage overnight.

The actual cost to replum for most of us was somewhere between 4,000-5,000 which is not expensive given the cost of damage that can happen from a major break. The repair cost includes patching and painting the walls (not wallpaper repair).

During the run up in housing prices it amazed me that the house next to me sold twice without anyone asking for the pipes to be repaired and this was after at least one major break! The last owner finally took care of the pipes inorder to rent the property - he also has lost almost 50% of the value in his home.

Delta Mechanical is the primary plumber used by most of my neighbors.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,136 times
Reputation: 11
What is the phone number AND ADDRESS of the company to file a polybutylene claim in 2013 for leaking plumbing in one's home?

Byron
Email: mogel007@yahoo.com
(319) 855-5922
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