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Old 08-16-2008, 11:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
This same situation exists in many states, some much larger. Look at NY State. Other than NYC, there are only very small cities, similar in size to the other cities in GA. Buffalo has a larger metro area, but it's also 400 miles from NYC. In Illinois, you have Chicago, and what else, Springfield? In Michigan, you have Detroit, and just smaller cities like Ann Arbor. In Washington, you have Seattle, and small cities like Spokane. The list goes on.

As many have said, Atlanta is a junction of railroads, interstate highways, and it also is the point where the topographic boundaries meet, the highlands meet the plains, and the rivers pass. Given that it's also the state capital, much of the attention and investment historically was given to Atlanta. Beginning in the 1980's and building with the Olympics in 1996, Atlanta grew to be a center of business and the focus for business in Georgia. That attracted people to relocate, and when you combine that with the cultural attraction of blacks to Atlanta, it's grown much more than other parts of the state.



With the lone exception of Seattle, every large city you mention: NYC, Chicago, and Detroit has large percentages of African-Americans. Civil rights figures predominately in these cities' growth patterns just like certain cities in the South.

Last edited by Zel Ya; 08-16-2008 at 12:03 PM..
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Old 08-17-2008, 12:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MMANN View Post
I dont think civil rights has anything to do with it. Its simpler than that:

If you take Atlanta out of Georgia, all you have is Mississippi. In other words, outside of Atlanta, Georgia is pretty poedunk (besides Savannah). The rest of those small cities suck in my opinion.
Actually, it does a lot (but includes more than what the poster stated)...

Atlanta and Birmingham (until the mid 1950's) were of roughly equal-size, importance, and economic might.

The two cities' reactions to the Civil Rights Movement caused the southern airport hub, and northern business investment/relocations to happen in Atlanta (not Birmingham)...the rest is history. (And, it has been said that Birmingham was actually designated as a more desirable location for the airport hub since it is more centralized in the American South.)

(Now, it must be said as well...it wasn't as if Atlanta's white power/business elite was magically non-racist or something...they were just very pragamatic...they were businessmen...and the business of Atlanta is business! They didn't want any messy civil rights junk hurting their profits and progress.)
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Old 08-17-2008, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Also, don't forget the fact that the ONLY white, Southern politician to testify before Congress in favor of the passage of Civil Rights legislation was the Mayor of Atlanta, Ivan Allen. It is also very telling that this was the ONLY large American city that did not explode into rioting after the assasination of MLK.

All of these various things played a part in making Atlanta the capitol of the South.
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Old 08-17-2008, 06:57 AM
 
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Absolutely, Memphis, like Birmingham was doomed because of the behavior before, during and after the Civil Rights movement...
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Old 08-17-2008, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Actually, it does a lot (but includes more than what the poster stated)...

Atlanta and Birmingham (until the mid 1950's) were of roughly equal-size, importance, and economic might.

The two cities' reactions to the Civil Rights Movement caused the southern airport hub, and northern business investment/relocations to happen in Atlanta (not Birmingham)...the rest is history. (And, it has been said that Birmingham was actually designated as a more desirable location for the airport hub since it is more centralized in the American South.)

(Now, it must be said as well...it wasn't as if Atlanta's white power/business elite was magically non-racist or something...they were just very pragamatic...they were businessmen...and the business of Atlanta is business! They didn't want any messy civil rights junk hurting their profits and progress.)


Thanks for your very informative post.

As I recall, the AJC had an article quite a few years ago contrasting Birmingham and Atlanta. It was a very good read.
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Old 08-17-2008, 08:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
Also, don't forget the fact that the ONLY white, Southern politician to testify before Congress in favor of the passage of Civil Rights legislation was the Mayor of Atlanta, Ivan Allen. It is also very telling that this was the ONLY large American city that did not explode into rioting after the assasination of MLK.

All of these various things played a part in making Atlanta the capitol of the South.


Thanks for that important piece of information.

There's no question Atlanta was very fortunate to have such progressive, envisionary, street-smart, and perceptive people, both black and white, shaping its destiny.
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Old 08-17-2008, 11:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Georgia View Post
One reason is due to interstate construction. If you notice, unlike NC and FL for example, every highway system in Georgia leads to what center? Atlanta.

On an economic end you will need to re-arrange your question to Why is Atlanta so dependent on Georgia considering the majority of the state tax bite is shipped to Atlanta on an annual basis to constantly bail out the fiscal mismanagement of the city. With quarter billion dollar deficits, half billion in missingTAD funds, and government dependency programs, it's hard to send capital to other areas of the state for growth. If so, you would find boom towns in the Savannah and Columbus areas. This you will probably find as the norm opinion in the Georgia vs. Atlanta thread

What a bizarre and completely false post.
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Old 08-17-2008, 01:50 PM
 
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the same reason ny is so dependent on nyc, the same for chicago, vegas, new orleans, bmore, etc
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Old 08-17-2008, 02:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgia View Post
One reason is due to interstate construction. If you notice, unlike NC and FL for example, every highway system in Georgia leads to what center? Atlanta.

On an economic end you will need to re-arrange your question to Why is Atlanta so dependent on Georgia considering the majority of the state tax bite is shipped to Atlanta on an annual basis to constantly bail out the fiscal mismanagement of the city. With quarter billion dollar deficits, half billion in missingTAD funds, and government dependency programs, it's hard to send capital to other areas of the state for growth. If so, you would find boom towns in the Savannah and Columbus areas. This you will probably find as the norm opinion in the Georgia vs. Atlanta thread
Georgia has I-185, I-16, and I-95, each of which do not go to Atlanta. Furthermore, there are very small sections of I-24 and I-59 which clip the far northwestern corner of the state.
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Old 08-17-2008, 02:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
Actually, President Clinton was in the final planning stages for a "secondary" Interstate system that would fill in the blanks where there are none now, before the um, "controversy" and witchhunt began in his term, so that idea was shelved - actually, along with a national lottery which was in the planning stages too if memory serves.

My home town is in Charleston, West Virginia. I drive hours longer than I could, if only there were an interstate that connected Atlanta to Knoxville in a straight line, and Knoxville to Charleston. But the "curve" route that I have to take adds about 2.5 to 3 hours to the trip. There are plenty of other city-to-city trips that would be greatly reduced if they did a secondary system of roads (and yes, bringing back the rail system would help, too).

Other states that also have one major city that serve as their economic engine would be Indiana (Indianapolis), Maryland (Baltimore), Nebraska (Omaha), Oklahoma (Tulsa), etc. Georgia is not unique to have one major city that fuels a lot of the state's income (though certainly not all of it). Savannah was supposed to be the big city in Georgia and was planned from the get-go to be such by the founders. It just never happened when rail overtook the shipping industry, causing Atlanta ("Terminus") to take over.
Oklahoma has Oklahoma City, their biggest metro. Omaha has a little less than one million in their metro area. Maryland also has part of the DC metro area.

I don't know why this is an issue. I mean, North Carolina has three medium-sized metro areas (Charlotte, Piedmont Triad, Research Triangle), as well as a couple small sized metro areas, whereas Georgia has one very large metro area and several smaller ones. Florida is atypical, considering that it is a peninsula in a different climate that would generally attract more people.
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