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Old 02-26-2009, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,154 posts, read 8,321,547 times
Reputation: 5970

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I see Atlanta is still full of everything that I saw before. Still the same...after almost a decade.

Stay classy, Atlanta.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Training_Day

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/ee/Training_day_ver1.jpg/200px-Training_day_ver1.jpg (broken link)
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,154 posts, read 8,321,547 times
Reputation: 5970
The New York Times > Log In

ATLANTA, Nov. 27 — The police chief placed all eight members of a narcotics investigation team on leave Monday after a confidential informant said they had asked him to lie during the investigation of the death of an 88-year-old woman, shot and killed by police officers during a drug raid last Tuesday.

Etc...etc...

Botched Paramilitary Police Raids

Click the link. Check the map. Realize the war on drugs is amazingly convenient for cops to commit felony home invasion and murder.

Know what's funny? If the person had been younger...no one would've questioned it. A little dope? Sure, no problem.

When people like Kathryn Johnston or Cory Maye understandably mistake raiding police officers for criminal intruders, police and prosecutors are rather unforgiving, particularly if the warrant was “legal.” People like Maye and Johnston are supposed to show remarkable poise and judgment, despite the fact that armed men are breaking into their homes..
When police make mistakes, however, they’re nearly always forgiven.

Because we’re supposed to understand how an officer in such a volatile situation might misjudge an everyday object for a gun, or shoot a completely innocent, unarmed man — all perfectly understandable, given the volatile, confrontational circumstances surrounding SWAT raids. Such deaths — while tragic — are mere collateral damage. We have to keep fighting the war on drugs. And we have to protect our police officers by allowing them to break down doors while people are sleeping. The deaths of a few innocent people are the price we pay for the privilege of having the government tell us what we are and aren’t allowed to put into our bodies.

It’s an abhorrent double standard. Below, I’ve listed some cases in Georgia that illustrate it. The cases below tend to be below-the-radar cases.

Xavier Bennett: In 1991, police in Dekalb County conduct a 2:30am no-knock raid on the home of Bobby Bowman, a man they suspect of possessing cocaine. They were right. He did, though only enough to identify him as a user, not a dealer. What they didn’t expect is that his 8-year-old stepson Xavier Bennett would be inside, too. When Bowman, who says he thought he was being invaded, met police with a gun, the boy was killed in the crossfire. No disciplinary actions were taken against the police. So police conduct a dangerous no-knock on a home where a child’s inside. The child dies. Police blame the father of the child for (1) possessing cocaine, and (2) not realizing the raiding party was police.

Lynette Gayle Jackson: On September 22, 2000, police in Riverdale, Georgia shoot and kill Lynette Gayle Jackson in an early morning, no-knock drug raid. Less than a month earlier, Jackson had been at home when burglars broke into the same house. She escaped out a window and called the police while the intruders ransacked her home. When police arrived to answer the burglary call, they found a small bag of cocaine in the bedroom that belonged to Jackson’s boyfriend. While the quantity of cocaine wasn’t sufficient to press charges, police began a subsequent investigation of Jackson’s boyfriend that led to the September no-knock raid on her home.

As that raid transpired, Jackson, believing she was being robbed again, held a gun in her bedroom as the SWAT team entered. That’s when the police opened fire, killing her. Her maintenance man later told reporters she had been frightened by the previous burglary. Jackson had asked him to install new locks, security bars on her windows, and a motion-detecting security light. The man told the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, “I think she was scared and she probably thought it was another break-in.”
No disciplinary action was taken against the officers.

So police raid the home of an innocent woman while looking for her boyfriend. She mistakes them for intruders (justifiably so, after having just been burgled), and is shot and killed. It’s all her fault. Shouldn’t have been dating a man who uses cocaine. Shouldn’t have had a gun for home protection. Shouldn’t have been scared. Shouldn’t have assumed that when armed men break into your home, it’s probably the burglars who broke in last time, not police looking for your small-time, dope-using boyfriend.

Roy and Belinda Baker. Early in the morning on September 30, 2005, police in Stockbridge, Georgia conduct a no-knock raid on the home of Roy and Belinda Baker. Officers break down the couple’s front door with a battering ram and toss in flashbang grenades. They hold the couple at gunpoint, handcuff them, and then send them out onto their porch, only partially clothed. Police ruin a family Bible and antique coffee table during the raid. Police eventually realize the intended target of the raid lives next door. Police Chief Russ Abernathy called the raid “inexcusable” and “not acceptable,” and blamed poor street lighting. But Abernathy added that no one would be fired of disciplined, and that the raids would go on, albeit after “reviewing procedures.”

The Bakers are considering a lawsuit.
So police conduct a raid on the wrong home. Had Roy or Belinda Baker owned a gun, one or both might be dead. But since no one was hurt, no harm was done, and it’s really no one’s fault. So there’s no need to assign blame. No one is punished for terrorizing two innocent people.

Deputy Joseph Whitehead. In 2006, police in Macon conduct a 1:30 am raid on a suspected drug house. Residents of the house say they were startled from sleep, believed they were being robbed, and shot to defend themselves. In the process, the shoot and kill Dep. Whitehead. Once the resident realize they’re being raided by police and not gang members, they surrender immediately. Prosecutors charge all five residents with murder, including two who had nothing to do with the shooting, one who wasn’t even home at the time of the raid. Two face the death penalty. The sheriff later says of the raid, “It just went wrong.”

So if you mistake midnight-raiding police for intruders and there are drugs in your home, your mistake means the death penalty. If your roommates possess drugs and mistake raiding police for intruders and shoot and kill an officer, you’re looking at a murder charge.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:31 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 12,741,668 times
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Five different cases in five different cities...with five different law enforcement agencies. Macon isn't even in the Metro Atlanta area...and it happens in places besides Atlanta, so I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Here are some other stories - NOT IN GEORGIA:

Pr. George's Officers Lacked 'No-Knock' Warrant in Raid - washingtonpost.com

ACLU Condemns Shooting of Denver Man in No-Knock Raid

Arkansas Times

Chesapeake police warrant policy being reviewed in wake of shooting | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

No SWAT

The U.S. Supreme Court (also not in Georgia) approved no-knock warrants in 2006...The Seattle Times: Nation & World: U.S. Supreme Court OKs no-knock searches

I don't necessarily agree with the legality of no-knock warrants, and they are obviously dangerous to both citizens and police...but for someone to knock Atlanta and Georgia for something that happens all over is absurd. Take it somewhere else.

Last edited by DeaconJ; 02-26-2009 at 12:48 PM..
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,129 posts, read 21,702,676 times
Reputation: 4745
I think it goes without saying that things need to stay on the topic of the thread, or, "slam".

That being said,

In regards to the shortest jail term (5 years) being handed down to the officer Arthur Tesler: It should be noted that Tesler was behind the home when this happened. As far as he was concerned at the time, it was a valid raid given the info he and a few other officers there had as they were unaware of the main officers already starting to realize it was screwed up and covering their tracks. It was after the fact, that Tesler was made aware of what had really happened. The other two were well aware of the mistakes made as they happened (or even before), but the third officer involved (Tesler) was not.

Tesler's biggest mistake was not taking the risk to report it. I have known officers myself, and it's been brought to light due to this event how there is no anonymous way for GOOD officers to report corrupt/coverup actions of bad officers, without them being known as the "snitch", which yes, really can put their lives in danger. Tesler still considering what happened should have "grown a pair" and reported it up front anyway - in which case he'd be walking free right now. Instead he cowered and covered it, hence, why he is serving jail time.

I in no way know this guy, and I'm one of the first to say that bad cops need to be off of every force and those who commit crimes and coverups should indeed be punished for it as would anyone else. I am however, pointing out, that third officer Tesler was not the one who shot the elderly woman, or at the moment it happened was even aware what was going on was wrong - until later. So some of the "hang them all" comments about the three officers are misplaced about this one. He's just an idiot for allowing fear to cause him to cover it up - but you don't deserve death for being an idiot.

I can't speak for the sentence terms handed down for the other two officers though - I'm not a judge, and didn't hear all of the evidence in the courtroom, as everyone else here.
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Old 02-26-2009, 03:29 PM
 
Location: East Side of ATL
2,747 posts, read 3,116,097 times
Reputation: 910
I agree with you, Greg. I don't agree with his sentence at all. He was between a rock and hard place.

I have to look up the article again but one of the cops had already reported someone beforehand aka snitchin and his complaint was ignored and he was sent to the airport which in Atlanta PD, its the grudge assignment, that most of the officers hate...
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Old 02-27-2009, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,825 posts, read 2,391,094 times
Reputation: 1498
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
I think it goes without saying that things need to stay on the topic of the thread, or, "slam".

That being said,

In regards to the shortest jail term (5 years) being handed down to the officer Arthur Tesler: It should be noted that Tesler was behind the home when this happened. As far as he was concerned at the time, it was a valid raid given the info he and a few other officers there had as they were unaware of the main officers already starting to realize it was screwed up and covering their tracks. It was after the fact, that Tesler was made aware of what had really happened. The other two were well aware of the mistakes made as they happened (or even before), but the third officer involved (Tesler) was not.

Tesler's biggest mistake was not taking the risk to report it. I have known officers myself, and it's been brought to light due to this event how there is no anonymous way for GOOD officers to report corrupt/coverup actions of bad officers, without them being known as the "snitch", which yes, really can put their lives in danger. Tesler still considering what happened should have "grown a pair" and reported it up front anyway - in which case he'd be walking free right now. Instead he cowered and covered it, hence, why he is serving jail time.

I in no way know this guy, and I'm one of the first to say that bad cops need to be off of every force and those who commit crimes and coverups should indeed be punished for it as would anyone else. I am however, pointing out, that third officer Tesler was not the one who shot the elderly woman, or at the moment it happened was even aware what was going on was wrong - until later. So some of the "hang them all" comments about the three officers are misplaced about this one. He's just an idiot for allowing fear to cause him to cover it up - but you don't deserve death for being an idiot.

I can't speak for the sentence terms handed down for the other two officers though - I'm not a judge, and didn't hear all of the evidence in the courtroom, as everyone else here.
What really bothers me about this whole fiasco is that people actually think that by switching a couple of officers in and out of the narcotics unit will change anything when it's the whole leadership that should take the hit. Chief Pennington should have been given his walking papers for letting such a fiasco happen on his watch along with a couple of other higher-ups at APD.

I really don't care for the black leadership here when they focus so much on pinning the blame on the white guys when its their own house that needs some housecleaning. So much crime happens here and it's guys like that so-called "civil-rights" activist Minister Markell Hutchins who seem TOO focused on finding the next "Sheriff Bull Connor" type to picket that they totally refuse to take on the inner turmoil that is taking place in many black communities, especially like the ones where Ms. Kathryn Johnston(God rest her soul) had her life taken.

Just my 2 pennies, unfortunately...
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