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Old 09-05-2009, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
815 posts, read 1,792,288 times
Reputation: 297

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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Yeh.Savannah and Macon are more dangerous to me.People dopwn there are some crazy stufff.And it has NEVER let up.

Oh yeah, Savannah per capita is the worst city in GA.

 
Old 09-05-2009, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
815 posts, read 1,792,288 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by softwareengineer1101 View Post
I used to hear about BMF in Detroit back in the day (Late 80s to Early 1990s). They were called "The family" back then and had pretty big numbers. I didn't know they were still around. When did they get to Atlanta?

I think the late 90's, not sure though. They were like a dope boy draft, they would go to different cities and get dudes on their team who they saw were doing "big things" I guess in their respective areas. Someone told me that you dont get down with BMF, they come find you and get you down with them. And it makes sense I got a friend from high school doing time in the Feds right now behind messing with them and his friends were like a hood United Colors of Benneton, there were people from Detroit, Atlanta, Miami, St. Louis, B-More, KCMO, LA in his crew. I have never seen anything like that, even when I went off to college it seemed folks hung out with people from their own region. Ive never seen a bunch of dudes from different places "click up" like that, but I guess when you have a common goal to work towards its not that hard
 
Old 09-06-2009, 02:10 AM
 
Location: 30080
2,126 posts, read 3,400,971 times
Reputation: 1461
I had heard talks of it but I didnt actually realize that they had already closed down all the housing projects on Atlanta ALREADY. I didnt realize it until I saw Bowen Homes, Hollywood Court, Thomasville Heights etc have been boarded up. Honestly... coming from someone that grew up in the pj's that was the most terrible idea ever! My reason for saying that is.. for one they didnt end their government assistance, they just gave them section 8 vouchers.

Another thing.. youre taking people with a dog eat dog killa type mentality and just throwing them in middle class neighborhoods with people that arent used to having to deal with that... making them easy targets. Three.. you think crime spreaded to Clayton Co... just wait until this really starts to sink in. They basically took one element and spreaded it all around town... dumbest idea ive ever seen. With the foreclosures the way they are... more people will start to rent. Renting opens up the option for section 8. I have to wonder what was the logic behind this... I just cant see it. I guess now I know why crime on Hollowell is dying down... the courts arent there anymore.
 
Old 09-06-2009, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
815 posts, read 1,792,288 times
Reputation: 297
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhornet View Post
I had heard talks of it but I didnt actually realize that they had already closed down all the housing projects on Atlanta ALREADY. I didnt realize it until I saw Bowen Homes, Hollywood Court, Thomasville Heights etc have been boarded up. Honestly... coming from someone that grew up in the pj's that was the most terrible idea ever! My reason for saying that is.. for one they didnt end their government assistance, they just gave them section 8 vouchers.

Another thing.. youre taking people with a dog eat dog killa type mentality and just throwing them in middle class neighborhoods with people that arent used to having to deal with that... making them easy targets. Three.. you think crime spreaded to Clayton Co... just wait until this really starts to sink in. They basically took one element and spreaded it all around town... dumbest idea ive ever seen. With the foreclosures the way they are... more people will start to rent. Renting opens up the option for section 8. I have to wonder what was the logic behind this... I just cant see it. I guess now I know why crime on Hollowell is dying down... the courts arent there anymore.

Yeah that was the dumbest idea ever, but I think they knew what they were doing, they know full well that most of these project residents move to Clayton County, and I think they are fine with that. People think Clayton is bad now, but it really isn't, however Im sure it will be a real slum in about 10 years.
 
Old 09-06-2009, 11:01 AM
 
65 posts, read 160,268 times
Reputation: 36
Default gentrification . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhornet View Post
I had heard talks of it but I didnt actually realize that they had already closed down all the housing projects on Atlanta ALREADY. I didnt realize it until I saw Bowen Homes, Hollywood Court, Thomasville Heights etc have been boarded up. Honestly... coming from someone that grew up in the pj's that was the most terrible idea ever! My reason for saying that is.. for one they didnt end their government assistance, they just gave them section 8 vouchers.

Another thing.. youre taking people with a dog eat dog killa type mentality and just throwing them in middle class neighborhoods with people that arent used to having to deal with that... making them easy targets. Three.. you think crime spreaded to Clayton Co... just wait until this really starts to sink in. They basically took one element and spreaded it all around town... dumbest idea ive ever seen. With the foreclosures the way they are... more people will start to rent. Renting opens up the option for section 8. I have to wonder what was the logic behind this... I just cant see it. I guess now I know why crime on Hollowell is dying down... the courts arent there anymore.
the city hasn't closed all the projects yet, but the plan is for all of them to close within the next few years. from living in SW ATL my assessment is the city has gotten really excited about the people who want to move back in town, and trying attract them by redistributing pockets of poverty and open up cheap land. after all thomasville is down the street from Grant Park. i completely agree with your thoughts about what will happen next. with the foreclosure rate as is many people are buying cheap property and renting to section 8. i see it on my street everyday. what ive noticed though is they never stay. typically it seems the landlords have no clue about what their doing. so the renters cycle in and out until someone buys the house. as you get more home owners, you get less tolerance for renters, until the renters in neighborhood are pushed out. gentrification.

my other evidence of this, as a former teacher at least half of my students stayed ATL projects. everytime one closed they got spread out all over the city. some ended up in cheap rental housing in town, quite a few did move out of the city because that is where apartments are cheaper. some of them ended up getting up as early as 4 am to catch public transit to school and finally gave up and went to their neighborhood school

i also saw a tv special about a place in kentucky? whose city went through the same process. the hope was that by ending high poverty areas they would reduce poverty. some real estate person in the city did a study the years after the process and tracked where all the people from the pjs went; it showed that the crime just spread like brush fires. instead of being in the same 2-3 places in the city, the same crime happened but just in spots all around the city - towards your point above. they showed apartments that were average that eventually turned into near pjs. same stuff going down

whichever way you look at it, seems like in ATL some people with bad intentions are trying to get rid of the poor people and others with good intentions are trying to reduce pockets of poverty. i'm not really confident either will ever happen. doesn't seem like spreading poverty across a city does anything but spread the problems across the city. it doesn't eradicate the poverty

interestingly, you said you don't agree with pjs but don't agree with the result of them closing. what do you think is a way to provide cheap housing? i've been wondering this myself for awhile. everyone can't be a home owner.
 
Old 09-06-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: 30080
2,126 posts, read 3,400,971 times
Reputation: 1461
I didnt say I dont agree with PJ's, I just dont agree with them closing. Main reason being is because you have a generation of people that have grown up and live there that no matter what... will NOT work to support themselves and use crime to make a living. That's an element you dont want to spread out. Honestly i'm not sure what could have been done about it other than to leave the PJ's where they were.
 
Old 09-06-2009, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,122,478 times
Reputation: 2162
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
I was just talking to a friend about this yesterday.He graduated from Morehouse in 2000.We started talking about the 19 year Spelman student that was killed a couple of days ago.He and I agree that the area near the AUC is nothing like it used to be.There were shootings it seemed almost weekly up until around 1998.It seemed it cleaned up a lot.I think there is an uptick in crime currently, but I think it is the speed in which the change has occurred more than the actual numbers.I am more aware of my surroundings than I would be where I grew up in the burbs.
I purchased a newly built house between Vine City and Historic Westside.I have been here 4 years.It is sometimes minor hassles that go with life living in the city and even more so an area in transition.My Dad was a Dean at Clark-Atlanta,so my parents knew the area well.They were somewhat concerned at first,but that subsided as the years have gone by.Although in the last year,there concerns have arisen again.So its really just more like the media makes you think that you cannot go anywhere without being a victim.I choose to live here,but I know that don't have to be scared .I would never live somewhere like that.However that does not mean I think I live in "Mayberry".
What Im saying is that I think its better to be "on guard" EVERYWHERE than the "obvious" places.
Great points. I'm just saddened that living in the city had to come with a price of having a lesser peace of mind. Being on mental guard all the time just to live somewhere is such a depressing way to live life, even though it's necessary. Will there never be a sense of relaxation? Is it truly not possible to live in a city for the economic benefit and yet have a sense of neighborly closeness with one's fellow man or woman?
 
Old 09-06-2009, 12:14 PM
 
1,333 posts, read 3,537,957 times
Reputation: 1223
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhornet View Post
It's worse now because its affecting "other" people...
Yes--when a crime-ridden neighbohood where the people don't take responsibility for their own community--where gangs put babies in microwaves, pimps live on every street corner, mothers have kids they can't control with no fathers in sight.--where dropouts reign supreme and drug dealers are the heroes--yes--when a crime occurs in this area people kind of yawn. Is that surprising? But when a neighborhood where one expects to be safe and free from this kind of crap--where children have manners, two-parent families, go to school--and I am talking about middle-class neighborhoods with all races and creeds included--in neighborhoods where people look out for each other and where hoods don't find recruits and people have values and mores that lead to success--when something happens in these neighborhoods it is indeed news because it is not supposed to be.

So--downtrodden areas with a perpetuation of grief are no longer viewed with
a sense of outrage when junk happens--it is expected and it is a problem that needs to be solved from the bottom-up. Is that ever going to happen?
Are leaders, churches, mentors, organizations, women's groups, elders and educators from within going to step up to protect and nurture their children?
 
Old 09-06-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,463 posts, read 4,122,478 times
Reputation: 2162
Default A great post by Tama

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
Yes--when a crime-ridden neighbohood where the people don't take responsibility for their own community--where gangs put babies in microwaves, pimps live on every street corner, mothers have kids they can't control with no fathers in sight.--where dropouts reign supreme and drug dealers are the heroes--yes--when a crime occurs in this area people kind of yawn. Is that surprising? But when a neighborhood where one expects to be safe and free from this kind of crap--where children have manners, two-parent families, go to school--and I am talking about middle-class neighborhoods with all races and creeds included--in neighborhoods where people look out for each other and where hoods don't find recruits and people have values and mores that lead to success--when something happens in these neighborhoods it is indeed news because it is not supposed to be.

So--downtrodden areas with a perpetuation of grief are no longer viewed with
a sense of outrage when junk happens--it is expected and it is a problem that needs to be solved from the bottom-up. Is that ever going to happen?
Are leaders, churches, mentors, organizations, women's groups, elders and educators from within going to step up to protect and nurture their children?
I love these last two points. People from poverty strickened areas can blame the media and the police all they want for their woes but at the end of the day it's the people most closest to the continuous tragedy who needs to step up to the plate. That includes holding mothers and fathers accountable for bringing children into the world without a thought for how they should be provided for.

The Derrick Boazmans, Able Mables, Vincent Forts and all the other "community activists" need to find another tactic to solve these entrenching problems rather than agitating for more press time.
 
Old 09-06-2009, 12:33 PM
 
1,546 posts, read 2,548,708 times
Reputation: 617
Quote:
Originally Posted by diva05 View Post
interestingly, you said you don't agree with pjs but don't agree with the result of them closing. what do you think is a way to provide cheap housing? i've been wondering this myself for awhile. everyone can't be a home owner.
Create nice, almost luxury live/work/play communities, with a deal that all of the employees, (janitors, concierge, landscapers, plumbers, electricians, maintenance people, roofers, builders, and the employees of the atached businesses etc.) must live in the community and in return, they get incredibly affordable rent/mortgage deals. It's like their jobs would be taking care of their homes and communities. In return, their children would go to the better schools, they would have a clean environment.

Like any job, there may be random drug tests, and there would be rules about leaving furniture on the street or loitering in certain areas for example. As long as there is a visible police presence... That could give some a chance to break the cycle of poverty. Perhaps the nearby schools could have afterschool mentoring programs for children of said parents...

They could even have a food bearing community garden that all the residents could participate in that would bring some dialogue between the affluent and poorer residents...

How's that sound?
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