U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-14-2009, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,036 posts, read 2,582,663 times
Reputation: 925
I never said it was unique to black artists, but when you're a minority group it has a greater impact. Dude Where's My Car would never become the only type white films made because most of the studios are owned by white people. Will they make more stupid white movies? Of course, but they'll also counteract those images with good movies, Oscar quality films. And there is where the problem comes in. Getting a good quality black movie greenlighted was always a problem. Much like for decades the publishing industry said 'black people don't read' so there was no black genre fiction out there. Now they'll say, 'black people only want to see coonery,' and darned if we haven't proved them correct.

How can Tyler Perry not be a major fail for Atlanta when he fires people for trying to get join the Writer's Guild of America? Interestingly enough, he's in the Director's Guild. Those writers wrote more than a hundred episodes of House of Payne, yet when they tried to get the residuals and fair pay any writer is entitled to they were fired. Anytime you bring in labor-busting practices into the entertainment industry it's an epic fail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockmama View Post
Is this really unique to black artists? Hollywood puts out tons of "white" crap movies because people pay to see them. Dude Where's My Car comes to mind :-) and there's tons of "white" crap music being produced, too. Nickelback comes to mind. I've always thought it makes me more proud to do what I do; it gives me the personal satisfaction that feeds my soul. I guess what I'm saying is that there will always be people who think that stuff is bad--whether or not it's the majority or not--and those are the ones I'm happy to please.

To say that the Tyler Perry machine is a major fail for Atlanta, or a step back for black culture is a little harsh. He's doing well for himself. Doesn't that make him a role model? His stuff MAY be silly, but it's all done in fun. He's not hurting anyone with his silly stuff. And even though he writes, produces and directs his own stuff doesn't mean he has no staff. But it's not really about what jobs he's creating in Atlanta--that's not his responsibility, nor is it any artist's responsibility. He's pleasing his audience, just like you or I aim to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-14-2009, 08:05 AM
 
150 posts, read 229,016 times
Reputation: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post

How can Tyler Perry not be a major fail for Atlanta when he fires people for trying to get join the Writer's Guild of America? Interestingly enough, he's in the Director's Guild. Those writers wrote more than a hundred episodes of House of Payne, yet when they tried to get the residuals and fair pay any writer is entitled to they were fired. Anytime you bring in labor-busting practices into the entertainment industry it's an epic fail.
Why did he do that? I'm not familiar with the story. I guess I've always assumed that NOT being a part of these organizations allows you more freedom as an artist. If you join them, aren't you saying you accept the Hollywood standards?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Downtown Silver Spring
177 posts, read 300,925 times
Reputation: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockmama View Post
Why did he do that? I'm not familiar with the story. I guess I've always assumed that NOT being a part of these organizations allows you more freedom as an artist. If you join them, aren't you saying you accept the Hollywood standards?
Hollywood standards? These are trade unions just like any other union you'd find in other labor fields. I've never watched anything put out by TP. I consider his stuff to be lowest common denominator crap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Dunwoody)
2,036 posts, read 2,582,663 times
Reputation: 925
I linked the Black Enterprise article. Here's one from the New York Times as well. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/03/ar...n/03perry.html

If you join the organizations you are accepting the protection of the union. Hollywood has no standard besides making money. Typically a writer on a television show receives close to $30k per script. If they're a staff writer that's in addition to the $100k salary they receive. That sounds like a lot until you realize that many television shows cost $10 million per episode to shoot. Considering that without the writers there is no show, their compensation is a mere pittance. He was also denying them their residuals. Writers are typically given a percentage of the profit when a television show goes into a new medium, such as DVDs or cable. Given the popularity of DVD sales of TV shows residuals have become a HUGE issue.

Black writers and other talent have more incentive than practically anyone to be in unions. Since jobs are much scarcer for black talent, the likelihood of exploitation increases exponentially.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockmama View Post
Why did he do that? I'm not familiar with the story. I guess I've always assumed that NOT being a part of these organizations allows you more freedom as an artist. If you join them, aren't you saying you accept the Hollywood standards?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 08:30 AM
 
Location: San Antonio-Westover Hills
6,866 posts, read 12,617,229 times
Reputation: 4948
I really like Tyler Perry. He's very talented, IMHO. I know Madea is a little tired, but honestly, it is so funny!! I loved Diary of a Mad Black Woman. Good stuff and IMHO empowering to all women no matter what color you are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
8,040 posts, read 7,132,917 times
Reputation: 2338
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedShrek View Post
Hollywood standards? These are trade unions just like any other union you'd find in other labor fields. I've never watched anything put out by TP. I consider his stuff to be lowest common denominator crap.
This is the issue I have.If you have NEVER SEEN ANY of his work.How can you say its all crap?The Family That Preys I thought was one of his best works.It showed some growth.I think if he did more films like that he would have a better reputation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:29 AM
 
150 posts, read 229,016 times
Reputation: 57
I see. I think I actually agree with you on many points, just with a different perspective--I don't see it as a Tyler Perry problem. We're Americans, and our standards are... well, American. It's why McDonald's is huge. And Nickelback, and Tyler Perry. I've just always accepted the fact that what I produce as a writer or a musician will never be mainstream, and I guess I kinda like it that way. I'll admit to not knowing much about the movie industry and how the unions work . (So to the other poster, CHILL, I was just asking.) I hear what you're saying about needing more "intellectual" representation in the mainstream by black artists. I'd like to see all Americans turn to more thoughtful art, but that's not going to happen. As long as we demand the mindless stuff, the moneymakers will oblige.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
I linked the Black Enterprise article. Here's one from the New York Times as well. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/03/ar...n/03perry.html

If you join the organizations you are accepting the protection of the union. Hollywood has no standard besides making money. Typically a writer on a television show receives close to $30k per script. If they're a staff writer that's in addition to the $100k salary they receive. That sounds like a lot until you realize that many television shows cost $10 million per episode to shoot. Considering that without the writers there is no show, their compensation is a mere pittance. He was also denying them their residuals. Writers are typically given a percentage of the profit when a television show goes into a new medium, such as DVDs or cable. Given the popularity of DVD sales of TV shows residuals have become a HUGE issue.

Black writers and other talent have more incentive than practically anyone to be in unions. Since jobs are much scarcer for black talent, the likelihood of exploitation increases exponentially.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:32 AM
 
150 posts, read 229,016 times
Reputation: 57
I'll also add, just so I don't get flamed... I like mindless entertainment sometimes. I won't tell you how many times I've seen Harold and Kumar go to White Castle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:49 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 1,928,851 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by teejuris View Post
Tyler Perry is a very intelligent, thoughtful, humble, creative and innovative comedian, playwright and businessman. He is actively engaged and involved in community outreach and enrichment. His story is one of determination, perseverance and survival.

Moviegoers walk away from his movies displaying a range of emotions: Laughing, crying, pensive and/or self reflective. His movies are very accurate in portraying relationship and socioeconomic issues in the African American community. However, they have universal appeal. Many of his characters endure and overcome hardships, childhood and family issues, which is very encouraging for people facing similar challenges.
As a man, I find his portrayal of women very flat and one-dimensional but women love his films so maybe I'm wrong... only saw 2... they were both average in my estimation but he knows exactly what his audience wants... simple themes of self-redemption and growth sprinkled with juvenile comedy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:50 AM
 
8,687 posts, read 11,901,365 times
Reputation: 1940
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoslynHolcomb View Post
The major problem is that the man didn't pay his writers which is why the Writer's Guild of America got involved. There are union laws involved in movie and television production to protect the workers from unscrupulous labor practices. He was accused of violating some of those laws.

I don't think he shows the whole 'diaspora' of the black experience at all. I think he shows extreme bias against upwardly mobile and professional black women. I think he shows extreme colorism, note the 'bad guy/girl' is always dark. And the sexism is so rampant it isn't even funny.

And all that's before we look at the lack of writing skill and technical expertise, continuity problems and heck just plain lack of logic or basic filmmaking ability.

And then we come to Madea, the patron saint of this man loathing of black women. Don't y'all think it's a bit curious that the only men you see consistently playing women in mainstream films are black men? And no, don't tell me about movies like Some Like it Hot or Mrs. Doubtfire. In those movies the men are not playing women, they're playing men who pretend to be women. I think it's insulting to both black men and women that this is so routine for us that Evander Holyfield is even 'going Madea' in a Taco Bell commercial.

And therein lies the problem with Mr. Perry. His success means that there is less opportunity for filmmakers who actually produce decent cinema, much as the presence of so-called street-lit makes it more difficult to get actual literature published. Hollywood loves a formula, and now they know that all you have to do is throw a black man in a wig and bring in a parade of stereotypes and coonery and of course, some good old time religion and black folk will show up in droves. The problem is, that's what they were producing for us seventy years ago. The times they are a-changing.
I totally agree with the highlighted points above.

However, I do like how he invests in and stays loyal to Atlanta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top