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Unread 10-02-2009, 06:26 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,208 posts, read 5,771,194 times
Reputation: 3324
Quote:
Originally Posted by newat6 View Post
Commonly held misconception - most of the loss has been due to bulldozers.
Growth and Preservation--Atlanta: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
That's true, but it's to be expected. A major city will usually bulldoze it's way into a new direction. Preservation is good, and warranted, but not at the expense of progress. Plus, this is a national phenomena. Hardly anything exists in Manhattan from the mid-19th century either.
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Unread 10-02-2009, 06:56 PM
 
653 posts, read 712,940 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by newat6 View Post
I'm in Fairlie-Poplar quite often and it's a beautiful district, I just wish there was more of it. Also, there are gorgeous historic buildings in Midtown but they don't form a contiguous area (besides the historic neighborhoods - AP and Historic Midtown). It's more here and there.
And I think this is the number one negative from the perspective of a visitor to the city. There are little slices of historic architecture, walk-ability and urbanism but there is no large contiguous area of those things.
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Unread 10-02-2009, 07:09 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,208 posts, read 5,771,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J2rescue View Post
And I think this is the number one negative from the perspective of a visitor to the city. There are little slices of historic architecture, walk-ability and urbanism but there is no large contiguous area of those things.
How is Peachtree Street from Downtown to Buckhead (9 miles from beginning to end) one large contiguous area of those things you listed? Or not Ponce from Midtown to Highlands? Or Piedmont in Midtown? Why is it that Atlanta has to meet those three criteria or not be considered urban? Atlanta is Atlanta.
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Unread 10-02-2009, 07:55 PM
 
183 posts, read 55,514 times
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They want all citys too look alike and not have there own style. Every city needs to be like NYC or any other northeastern city. I am glad there are regions that are built differently makes it more interesting instead of things look the same. Thats just like the night life thing. because there isnt this big district full of clubs people say there is no night life HUH??? I think Atlanta is fine the way it is, But for those who think not there still room for growth and improvement
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Unread 10-02-2009, 09:48 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 11,462,429 times
Reputation: 2580
Quote:
Originally Posted by newat6 View Post
I'm in Fairlie-Poplar quite often and it's a beautiful district, I just wish there was more of it. Also, there are gorgeous historic buildings in Midtown but they don't form a contiguous area (besides the historic neighborhoods - AP and Historic Midtown). It's more here and there.
Fairlie-Poplar is a full 25 blocks of central Downtown Atlanta...it's actually a large historic district, especially for one located in a center city. It's nothing to sneeze at, either due to its size or historic status. Fairlie--Poplar Historic District--Atlanta: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary

Just next door to Fairlie-Poplar is:
1. the Hotel Row Historic District (http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/atlanta/hot.htm) (broken link)
2. the Castleberry Hill Historic District (Castleberry Hill Historic District--Atlanta: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary)
3. the Underground Atlanta Historic District (Castleberry Hill Historic District--Atlanta: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary)
4. the Government District with it's historic buildings group that include Atlanta City Hall, the State Capitol, Shrine of the Immaculate Conception and Central Presbyterian
5. the Imperial Hotel area that includes the Medical Arts Building, Church of the Sacred Heart, and First Methodist

The Fox Theater Historic District in Midtown contains a nice cluster of historic buildings: The Fox, The Ponce, The Georgian Terrace, and the Cox-Carlton Hotel (Hotel Indigo). The Georgia Tech Historic District also has a nice grouping of historic structures, along with the Biltmore Hotel, Biltmore Apartments, and Academy of Medicine on Spring Street by Georgia Tech in Midtown. The Sear's Building on Ponce sitting beside the historic Ford Factory and the plethora of historic factories-turned-lofts in the Old Fourth Ward District is substantial.

There are historic churches and buildings throughout Midtown and Downtown that, IMO, are not diminished in any way just because they aren't part of a contiguous area. There are many historic apartment buildings situated in groups and blocks all through Midtown and along Peachtree Street. I actually like to see history mixed in among the newer structures...it makes for a diverse built environment.
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Unread 10-02-2009, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,752 posts, read 17,409,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Care to give an example?
Typical Houston Suburb:
http://images.lightstalkers.org/images/840515/sprawl_houston_suburb_2006_large.jpg (broken link)

Typical Dallas Suburb:


Typical Atlanta Suburb:
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Unread 10-03-2009, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,150 posts, read 1,312,375 times
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Well I for one do think development is good. Without it, a city would cease to be a living thing and die. However, I wish there was a bit more thought placed into development. I really think a lot of places in the metro that as they mature, can be come a lot more walkable and pedestrian friendly. Hey, even out here in big Lawrenceville, I can walk to the park, library, several restaurants, and the drug store. I feasibly could walk to the grocery store, but the summers are hot...hehe. I'm really interested to hear what happens in Virginia, apparently they are trying to ban culs-de-sac, and making developments become interconnected. I can see that in pockets around Gwinnett, but not on a grand scale. To me, it seems like a no-brainer. Especailly after the flooding, and I was nearly trapped in my house, because there are only 2 secondary roads servicing a few dozen subdivisions that don't connect!
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Unread 10-03-2009, 07:40 AM
 
653 posts, read 712,940 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
How is Peachtree Street from Downtown to Buckhead (9 miles from beginning to end) one large contiguous area of those things you listed? Or not Ponce from Midtown to Highlands? Or Piedmont in Midtown? Why is it that Atlanta has to meet those three criteria or not be considered urban? Atlanta is Atlanta.
You aren't seriously suggesting that Peachtree is urban from Downtown to Buckhead are you? Yes it is physically possible to walk Peachtree and the other areas you mentioned. But the walk-ability I'm referring to implies a walk that it is safe, pleasant and attractive, as well as offering convenient access to all sorts of businesses from the sidewalk. There are way too many gaps even within Midtown for anything to be considered contiguous.

Obviously Atlanta doesn't "have to" meet those criteria - it doesn't. But it would be a more livable, more enjoyable and more attractive city if it did.

Why this criteria? Its just what the word means. Those are simply some of the technical characteristics that define a city or at least a city that functions well.

Fortunately things are moving in the right direction with the Blueprint Midtown for example, as well as most of the other intown neighborhoods that have master plans to help guide future development. The Beltline also has the goal of developing urban development around the corridor which is a very good thing.
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Unread 10-03-2009, 07:51 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,208 posts, read 5,771,194 times
Reputation: 3324
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Typical Houston Suburb:


Typical Dallas Suburb:


Typical Atlanta Suburb:
I wasn't talking about suburbs. I replying to his "nothingness" comment
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Unread 10-03-2009, 07:54 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
6,208 posts, read 5,771,194 times
Reputation: 3324
Quote:
Originally Posted by J2rescue View Post
You aren't seriously suggesting that Peachtree is urban from Downtown to Buckhead are you? Yes it is physically possible to walk Peachtree and the other areas you mentioned. But the walk-ability I'm referring to implies a walk that it is safe, pleasant and attractive, as well as offering convenient access to all sorts of businesses from the sidewalk. There are way too many gaps even within Midtown for anything to be considered contiguous.

Obviously Atlanta doesn't "have to" meet those criteria - it doesn't. But it would be a more livable, more enjoyable and more attractive city if it did.

Why this criteria? Its just what the word means. Those are simply some of the technical characteristics that define a city or at least a city that functions well.

Fortunately things are moving in the right direction with the Blueprint Midtown for example, as well as most of the other intown neighborhoods that have master plans to help guide future development. The Beltline also has the goal of developing urban development around the corridor which is a very good thing.
Yes, I am suggesting that. It's not perfect and there is room for improvement, but I am curious as to what you mean by these "gaps".

As for the safeness argument, I have walked each segment of that street from Garnett to Brookhaven several times. I never had any trouble aside from the occasional panhandling bum.
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