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Old 01-13-2010, 01:36 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,727,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vsmoove View Post
Interesting, Bob... I'll do the same next time I'm back... my wife and I (and other transplants) think the same thing so maybe there's some perception bias going on. I'll check it out. On the fruits/veggies end, I know for sure there's a difference.
That's where most of the difference is, but it's not as large as you think- the prices on those items have just considerably up north in the past two years based on what I saw in November. The reason I know that specifically is that my wife makes an excellent salsa, and we made a batch for the family when we were up there. On what usually costs around $25 for all of the fresh ingredients here, we spent around $22 and change.
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Old 01-13-2010, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,671 posts, read 5,539,596 times
Reputation: 1165
Quote:
Originally Posted by 208happystreet View Post
I grew up in the NY metro area and now live in Atlanta. Housing in metro New York area's is extremely expensive much more than Atlanta. The suburbs with good schools and train service are also much more expensive than Atlanta. The cost of groceries is far more, property taxes are insane, income taxes are very high, car insurance rates are much more, electricity rates much higher, services are also much higher. If you commute from the suburbs parking is at a premium and expensive at the train stations. If you live in NJ and work in NY you will be paying NJ and NY taxes. People work long hours up there. Not many people work 9 to 5. Long hours are expected to move up the ladder. As my husband reminded me last week when we lived there he was gone from 6AM to 10PM.
I remember the days. Glad I was younger, single and able to do it. The advice I give to the Op is if, he/she is single, young and wants to enjoy NYC for a bit, why not?

But he/she can do the same living here. Go to NYC when he/she wants and really enjoy NYC. I will tell you this, most people who enjoy what NYC has to offer, aren't always NYC residents. I would not put my family through any of that in NYC anymore.

Most people who don't feel the pinch are either well-off, or live in subpar rent controlled apartments in the city, and more than likely will never own a home, and never enjoy NYC like others do.

There are people who moved here from NYC/Boston who are complaining. It's not the life they don't like down here, it seems to be the lack of money. I guarantee you, if you were to ask most of them to head up North now, and live the way they did before moving down here, many wouldn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vsmoove View Post
Interesting, Bob... I'll do the same next time I'm back... my wife and I (and other transplants) think the same thing so maybe there's some perception bias going on. I'll check it out. On the fruits/veggies end, I know for sure there's a difference.
Trust me, Bob is right. The difference is minimal Vsmoove. It's not worth buying a plane ticket to do a price comparison either.. (j/k)
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Old 01-14-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
927 posts, read 1,907,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
That's where most of the difference is, but it's not as large as you think- the prices on those items have just considerably up north in the past two years based on what I saw in November. The reason I know that specifically is that my wife makes an excellent salsa, and we made a batch for the family when we were up there. On what usually costs around $25 for all of the fresh ingredients here, we spent around $22 and change.
It's too minimal of a difference to really make a difference. And, depending on where you live, you may not even have access to fresh fruits and veggies like that. In most of NYC, meaning all the boroughs outside of Manhattan, bodegas supply a lot of people's needs, and those places are beyond overpriced and just about everything is boxed. Cereal is priced ridiculously and I don't even trust the frozen foods in bodegas.

To get some decent fruits and veggies in most hoods outside of Manhattan, where the rent prices supersede the advantages of fresh fruit markets, it often requires a bus trip. That is too much damn work just for some bananas or whatever the hell else I'd need but can only fit in two hands since I mostly likely won't have a car. I'm more than happy stocking up on everything twice a month at a nice grocery store like Publix and saving the extra work of multiple bus trips to C-Town (aka the hood grocery store but one of the few available if I'm living in an affordable area in NYC). Obviously none of this is the OP's problem since apparently he'll be ballin' but for the average person who may be perusing this thread, this will offer some perspective for them :-).
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:20 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 2,878,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bizchick86 View Post
It's too minimal of a difference to really make a difference. And, depending on where you live, you may not even have access to fresh fruits and veggies like that. In most of NYC, meaning all the boroughs outside of Manhattan, bodegas supply a lot of people's needs, and those places are beyond overpriced and just about everything is boxed. Cereal is priced ridiculously and I don't even trust the frozen foods in bodegas.

To get some decent fruits and veggies in most hoods outside of Manhattan, where the rent prices supersede the advantages of fresh fruit markets, it often requires a bus trip. That is too much damn work just for some bananas or whatever the hell else I'd need but can only fit in two hands since I mostly likely won't have a car. I'm more than happy stocking up on everything twice a month at a nice grocery store like Publix and saving the extra work of multiple bus trips to C-Town (aka the hood grocery store but one of the few available if I'm living in an affordable area in NYC). Obviously none of this is the OP's problem since apparently he'll be ballin' but for the average person who may be perusing this thread, this will offer some perspective for them :-).
If you make 225K in NYC, you're not shopping at C-Town. LOL... even when I lived in Bushwick, I had a nice grocery store that I could walk to.
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
927 posts, read 1,907,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vsmoove View Post
If you make 225K in NYC, you're not shopping at C-Town. LOL... even when I lived in Bushwick, I had a nice grocery store that I could walk to.
Hence my last statement where I basically provide that disclaimer :-)

Originally Posted by bizchick86
It's too minimal of a difference to really make a difference. And, depending on where you live, you may not even have access to fresh fruits and veggies like that. In most of NYC, meaning all the boroughs outside of Manhattan, bodegas supply a lot of people's needs, and those places are beyond overpriced and just about everything is boxed. Cereal is priced ridiculously and I don't even trust the frozen foods in bodegas.

To get some decent fruits and veggies in most hoods outside of Manhattan, where the rent prices supersede the advantages of fresh fruit markets, it often requires a bus trip. That is too much damn work just for some bananas or whatever the hell else I'd need but can only fit in two hands since I mostly likely won't have a car. I'm more than happy stocking up on everything twice a month at a nice grocery store like Publix and saving the extra work of multiple bus trips to C-Town (aka the hood grocery store but one of the few available if I'm living in an affordable area in NYC). Obviously none of this is the OP's problem since apparently he'll be ballin' but for the average person who may be perusing this thread, this will offer some perspective for them :-).
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Old 01-17-2010, 12:56 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,637 posts, read 8,734,732 times
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No question at all!! NYC all the way!! Besides the fact you'd be in one of the greatest cities in the world, NYC kills Atlanta (I lived there for 3 years) in all categories--no comparison.
Granted, you would be paying more for living in NYC--but the ability to have anything and everything within a subway ride or several blocks away doesn't come cheap (as they say).
During this downturn, you can find a tremendous bargain on a hot 2 bedroom apartment in the West Village for a possible pricetag of around $900k +/-. The West Village!! Or, if that isn't your style, the Upper West Side, East Village, or Tribeca have bargains galore going on now.

It's really no question. Atlanta would offer a less expensive option, but unless you have family there, I'd jump on NYC like yesterday.
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Old 01-17-2010, 02:48 PM
 
230 posts, read 429,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
No question at all!! NYC all the way!! Besides the fact you'd be in one of the greatest cities in the world, NYC kills Atlanta (I lived there for 3 years) in all categories--no comparison.
Granted, you would be paying more for living in NYC--but the ability to have anything and everything within a subway ride or several blocks away doesn't come cheap (as they say).
During this downturn, you can find a tremendous bargain on a hot 2 bedroom apartment in the West Village for a possible pricetag of around $900k +/-. The West Village!! Or, if that isn't your style, the Upper West Side, East Village, or Tribeca have bargains galore going on now.

It's really no question. Atlanta would offer a less expensive option, but unless you have family there, I'd jump on NYC like yesterday.
Just curious how is $225k going to afford a "Tremendous Bargain" 2 bedroom apartment for $900k????

Sorry, $225k in NY is far from "Ballin" as many of you say.
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Old 01-17-2010, 03:01 PM
 
56,252 posts, read 80,408,935 times
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If you go with NYC, I'd probably look at spots in NJ, CT or in the counties outside of NYC in NY(Westchester, Rockland, Nassau and maybe even Suffolk). Remember that you have good public transportation and car use would be less in many cases versus using a car much more in Atlanta. There's less of a stigma in the NYC area too.

Then, think about what each has to offer outside of work. If you have children, think about schools.

I think smaller communities outside of NYC like: White Plains, Hoboken, Nyack, Baldwin, Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Jersey City, Greenwich, Valley Stream and New Rochelle, among many others are places to think about if you go with NYC.

Here's a mass transit map for the NYC area:
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Old 01-19-2010, 12:25 PM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,748 posts, read 4,924,921 times
Reputation: 757
If you are going for NYC....plan on renting in Manhattan (don't do the burbs.... if thats your plan live in Atlanta), you won't save much cash unless you have a roomamte but plan on having a fantastic experience. After a few years come to Atlanta. I love NYC and I love Atlanta...and I mean no offense to Atlanta at all... I have lived in many cities....NYC is truly an experience like no other. If you have the opportunity take it.
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:31 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 2,878,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Homer12 View Post
Just curious how is $225k going to afford a "Tremendous Bargain" 2 bedroom apartment for $900k????

Sorry, $225k in NY is far from "Ballin" as many of you say.
Guys, when did it become obligatory to buy a home?? The vast majority of people in NY rent. There's nothing wrong with that and renters are probably better off nowadays than those of us who bought in the last 6 years. Depending on the level of debt you have, you can ball out in NY on 225K... I did for less when I was single.
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