U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-18-2010, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Roswell, GA
697 posts, read 2,562,490 times
Reputation: 499

Advertisements

We're in North Fulton, so whatever I say is applicable only here. Both of our older two kids were tested for the school system's Talented and Gifted (TAG) program shortly after we entered the school system, when the older was in third and the younger was in first grade (they'd been in private schools before that, so didn't experience public Pre-K or kindergarten). My son (the older of the two) narrowly missed qualifying for TAG, failing to meet one criterion of several. He has subsequently been recommended for re-testing every year by his teachers (on their initiative, not because of any requests from us) and continues to narrowly miss on one point each year -- he's being re-tested again today, in fact, in seventh grade. My daughter qualified and has been in the one-day-per-week pull-out TAG program in second through fifth grade. That's no particular distinction in her school, however -- pulling the TAG kids out of her class results in two kids being left behind with their regular teacher. She enjoys the recognition and opportunity to do things beyond what they do in regular classes, but I honestly can't say that I've seen much difference in her intellectual development in comparison with my son, who was not in TAG. As has been mentioned, the schools typically do group students by ability, particularly in math and reading, and in some cases actually create class sections that are working at a higher grade level -- my daughter's in an advanced reading class, and both my son and daughter have frequently been in accelerated classes, despite the fact that my son's not in TAG. This continues at the middle school level -- my son's in accelerated science and math classes, for instance, in seventh grade.

Our youngest daughter just started kindergarten this year. She's an old kindergartner (late October birthday) and has been reading proficiently on her own since she was about 4, and also seems have a facility with math. She was quickly evaluated as belonging in an accelerated reading group; she's pulled out of her "regular' classroom, along with a few other kids, for reading and writing with a different teacher five days a week. There's no TAG program per se for kindergartners, but they do try to ensure that, given the wide developmental disparities at that age, that they're not boring half the class to tears while others struggle to keep up. If anything, they're probably challenging them more than she'd like at times -- she doesn't miss much, and she's figured out that she's doing a lot more work than some of the other kids, and isn't sure she likes it .
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2010, 06:38 AM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,747 posts, read 4,822,811 times
Reputation: 756
My daughter in Cobb county is in a one day pull out program called ALP advanced learning program. I don't really see it as being much. One thing to note is the school will no longer provide level appropriate reading materials for her for content reasons. Whether this is a GA thing or countrywide..I don't know. All of her advanced reading is done at home as a result. Now in 4th grade she finds the pull out program to be tedious.

If you are transfering in from out of state be advised they don't always accept testing from other states. We came from MA and because the testing was not something GA was familair with, we had to be very persistent about testing her out of the usual 2 year cycle. It was very annoying.


The intial testing is done by COGAT results...then if they quailify they are tested further Iowas, Torrance (creativity), motivational scale etc. High COGATs don't guarantee a slot...my other child who is dyslexic had extremely high COGATS and was denied a spot.

Its funny my child who is in the program I would say is a very very bright hard working and academic but not gifted. My other child who I believe is extremely gifted didn't make the cut. This is probably true for a lot of kids.

Although I don't think too much of the gifted program, its a step in the right direction and I do find overall the (regular)curriculum in general to be geared more towards advanced/academic students. Sometimes I think we all like to think of our kids as gifted and schools cater to that.

Last edited by kaday; 03-18-2010 at 06:42 AM.. Reason: more info
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 06:53 AM
 
3,966 posts, read 10,798,205 times
Reputation: 1427
In GA, the gifted program is really more about high achieving and less about true giftedness. There are certainly high achieving students who are gifted but there are plenty of gifted students who are not high achieving.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 07:29 AM
 
109 posts, read 335,506 times
Reputation: 36
I have one child who is younger than the mandated start cutoff and I have to say with so many kids having been held back (its been the fashionable thing to do although I think the tide may be turning) it has not been a ride in the park. My child who is just slightly younger than the cutoff by weeks, at times has been almost 2 years younger than many classmates. This by nature can create problems.

Also the best way to evaluate a child's true giftedness is to have private testing administered by a psychologist who has a specialty in this area.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 10:07 AM
 
45 posts, read 186,392 times
Reputation: 29
In Gwinnett they would be looked at in 1st grade after taking the CoGAT for the first time. Upon looking at these test scores, they will do further testing if they score high enough on that. The pullout program is about 2 hours a week at this stage. It may be over a couple of days or all in one day.

High achieving won't cut it- they need stanines of 9 on their tests (ITBS, CoGAT- CRCT doesn't test giftedness- only if they know the specific curriculum for that grade level) and percentiles 95% or higher.

Their is a BIG difference between high achievers and true giftedness- not to say your child is not gifted. But a student can be a high achiever and not gifted. A previous poster was not clear on this-they will try to weed the child out from this. Just because a child makes all A's or E's does not mean they are gifted. And as the poster said, not all gifted children are high achievers. In my years of teaching, I have often seen these children be unmotivated and unwilling to go the "Extra mile." Perhaps from not being challenged enough? Motivation is a screener when looking at gifted kids.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 10:52 AM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,747 posts, read 4,822,811 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatormomtotots View Post
In Gwinnett they would be looked at in 1st grade after taking the CoGAT for the first time. Upon looking at these test scores, they will do further testing if they score high enough on that. The pullout program is about 2 hours a week at this stage. It may be over a couple of days or all in one day.

High achieving won't cut it- they need stanines of 9 on their tests (ITBS, CoGAT- CRCT doesn't test giftedness- only if they know the specific curriculum for that grade level) and percentiles 95% or higher.

Their is a BIG difference between high achievers and true giftedness- not to say your child is not gifted. But a student can be a high achiever and not gifted. A previous poster was not clear on this-they will try to weed the child out from this. Just because a child makes all A's or E's does not mean they are gifted. And as the poster said, not all gifted children are high achievers. In my years of teaching, I have often seen these children be unmotivated and unwilling to go the "Extra mile." Perhaps from not being challenged enough? Motivation is a screener when looking at gifted kids.
You know though I agree with you in theory but I know so many kids who scored 9's COGATS across the board (my high achiever included) who I don't believe are gifted. If that were the case a significant percentage of kids in the Target/ALP classes would be gifted. I believe most kids in gifted classes are high achievers. Many of the truly gifted are your twice excpetional kids who rarely test into gifted programs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Dunwoody,GA
1,861 posts, read 4,554,426 times
Reputation: 1932
I've seen quite a few kids shut out of Gifted who met all criteria other than the "creativity" test. I personally believe that that is a way they use to screen kids out b/c so many would qualify based on the intellectual and achievement criteria. So, it's not a "gimme" even if your child is quite bright.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Roswell, GA
697 posts, read 2,562,490 times
Reputation: 499
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMMom View Post
I've seen quite a few kids shut out of Gifted who met all criteria other than the "creativity" test. I personally believe that that is a way they use to screen kids out b/c so many would qualify based on the intellectual and achievement criteria. So, it's not a "gimme" even if your child is quite bright.
Precisely. My son for one. Which is hilarious, in a way, because you only have to spend a short time with him to realize that he's off-the-charts creative, but not in ways that get measured by the test.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 03:24 PM
 
12,913 posts, read 19,787,452 times
Reputation: 33920
I never did figure out what criteria they used for the creative test. We moved here from FL, where my son was in the gifted program, and were told that they wouldn't accept his classification because it didn't include the creativity section. I would have thought that 3 years of school orchestra would have sufficed.

He was retested (waste of money IMO), and placed in TAG. In high school the TAG program is very different. It seems to be geared towards coached independent study. We actually aren't involved in it at all, because the AP and dual-enrollment classes my son is enrolled in fulfill the TAG requirement.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2010, 06:42 PM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,747 posts, read 4,822,811 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by rackensack View Post
Precisely. My son for one. Which is hilarious, in a way, because you only have to spend a short time with him to realize that he's off-the-charts creative, but not in ways that get measured by the test.
Yes! creativity was my youngest's lowest score.......if they could only see my house...project after project crazy contraptions, artwork everywhere..30 sketches at least per day....stories, poetry (from a dyslexic)....and she is a seven year old....they don't come anymore creative.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top