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Old 05-26-2010, 12:43 PM
 
Location: ITP
2,133 posts, read 5,506,700 times
Reputation: 1333

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
Crime in the U.S. as a whole has decreased, and it has decreased in Atlanta city proper. But the reasons for this are due to a higher incarceration rate and a gentrifying city, respectively. Crime in Henry, Fayette, and Clayton counties has skyrocketed. Increases in crime in an area are usually the result of an increase in the population of uneducated/lower-class people, of any race. But if you take a look at demographic data of these counties, the uneducated/lower-class people causing the crime increase were most likely minority.

Again - please provide some data to support the argument that the income/educational attainment of blacks moving to Atlanta is higher than other metros. Just because Atlanta has more blacks, and perhaps more wealthy/educated blacks, doesnt mean that educated blacks or wealthier blacks move here in larger numbers than they do to other metros. You also probably have no data contradicting an argument that the percent of blacks (out of the total black population) who are educated or wealthy is no higher in Atlanta than the percent in Chicago or New York.

Playing the race card is a canned response. Calling someone out who plays it is a common sense response.

I ask someone to provide information on the educational attainment and income status of the black people moving here, and since you cannot do this, you try to associate me with the "racists of Arizona" in order to discredit my request. That is playing the race card. At the root of your response is an inferiority complex. You interpret my questioning of the income/educational status of the black people moving here as an attack on black people as a whole, and that just isnt the case.
It isn't solely due to gentrification and higher incarceration rates, but I'll let you keep thinking that. As far as data, you apparently are either too lazy or too unwilling to do the research yourself, so here are two links:

10 Best Cities For African Americans 2007 (http://www.sfgov.org/site/uploadedfiles/mocd/10%20Best%20Cities%20For%20African%20Americans-%20Hand-out.pdf - broken link)

State of Metropolitan America - Brookings

It's a rather common pattern of you to make an incendiary comment and then nail yourself to a cross when people call you out on it. You would seriously have to be living under a rock to not notice that Atlanta attracts a larger portion of middle-class blacks with higher levels of educational attainment than most metros.
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:33 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,190 posts, read 29,652,021 times
Reputation: 5091
WARNING:

I think it goes without saying that folks need to re-read the first post and comment ONLY on that post. Fighting, insulting, bickering etc will only earn you a vacation from being able to post. Contribute to the conversation and move on. Thank you.
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Old 05-31-2010, 02:49 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
200 posts, read 380,423 times
Reputation: 105
Well in terms of black educational attainment, Atlanta does attract more blacks with at least a bachelor's degree or more than any othe metropolitan area. Lets break it on down shall we...

According to the Status of Metropolitan America study done by Brookings:

African Americans with degrees in metro Atlanta grew by 83% from 2000-2008! Compared to 40% for metro Atlanta overall. The growth rate for blacks holding a master's degree or more grew even more; by an astounding 125% from 2000-2008!

Metro Atlanta has the second highest number of African Americans holding degrees (275,000) after only New York (451,000), recently surpassing Washington, DC (250,000).

One in four (24%) metro Atlantans holding a degree is an African American, compared to 10% in metro New York and 15% in metro DC. Almost one out of ten African American adults hold at least a master's degree in metro Atlanta.

Lastly, 27% of African American adults hold at least a bachelors degree compared to 19% nationwide.
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Old 05-31-2010, 04:28 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,899,785 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcorndog View Post
The President is Black. Isn't that the ultimate sign of progress?
No.
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Old 05-31-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,899,785 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Not in Minnesota. Unlike the South and other areas of the Midwest, biracial children here usually tend towards mainstream/white culture.
Probably because there is much less Black American cultural solidarity in those cities.
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Old 06-01-2010, 12:28 AM
 
4,244 posts, read 4,146,043 times
Reputation: 3218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Probably because there is much less Black American cultural solidarity in those cities.
No there's just less African Americans up there so they're raise away from African American culture.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:58 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,899,785 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
No there's just less African Americans up there so they're raise away from African American culture.
And that's pretty much why there's less cultural solidarity, but that's not always the case in places with low African American populations.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:13 PM
 
99 posts, read 277,591 times
Reputation: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
And that's pretty much why there's less cultural solidarity, but that's not always the case in places with low African American populations.

You pretty much nailed it on the head. Although my hometown isn't "black friendly", up the road in Waterloo lies a rich African-American culture dating back 4 generations (blacks from Mississippi broke a union strike amongst white railroad workers in 1914). That population's only 15% of the roughly 70,000 residents there, but in it you will find black professionals, professional organizations geared towards African Americans, and KBBG, the FIRST African-American owned radio station in the United States. I think that people just assume too much, like the "Atlanta is a Black Mecca" crap, or a community and its schools are "bad" merely because a strong plurality or majority of its residents are of color. Folks need to open their minds a little, regardless of their race. Now, off of my high horse...lol.

I was born in Mississippi, grew up in Iowa (DUH!!), and as a black person I, and many other blacks here DEFINITELY know who we are and where we came from. That's because the people in our families and in the larger communities from whence we came never let us forget who we were--for better and worse.

Funny, but New Orleans metro had roughly 500,000 blacks prior to Katrina and when the storm arrived on its shores in 2005, all of the skin color and class divisions between its various black subcultures came to light. Don't believe me? Just Google terms such as race, ethnicity, color divides, and Hurricane Katrina with New Orleans. One thing that benefits blacks in areas with low black populations (IMO), is that there can be a stronger sense of unity, since many people share common regional backgrounds (read an earlier post I had about my area) and have to deal with extremely large white, Latino, or (and) Asian populations. Of course, the flip side of "community" is that people may be a little too nosey for your taste, and there's that "crabs in the barrel" mentality, though I tend to think that's everywhere you go these days. Plus, it's always a good thing to be exposed to various people and places (IMO), which could possible help to mitigate clannishness. Personally, I think that a constant infusion of newer citizens into an area exposes people to different perspectives and enhances communities' and metropolitan areas' economic and social profiles--at home, and abroad. But that's just my two cents.

As I was saying earlier, yes, it may be harder to expose your child to black culture than, say, St. Louis, or New York. BTW, all black culture isn't equal. I don't want my kids around the "black hood" culture anymore than sensible white folks want their kids around "redneck" white culture. But with the internet and 24-hour media all around us (cable, cell phones, etc.), there's absolutely NO excuse why your child, regardless of background, should be ignorant about the larger world.
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Atlanta,GA
2,671 posts, read 5,424,893 times
Reputation: 1165
JTJ1977,

I'd rep you again if I could, but I have to spread it around. Great Post!
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Old 06-01-2010, 04:45 PM
 
1,685 posts, read 2,638,698 times
Reputation: 1362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dytdude View Post
Well in terms of black educational attainment, Atlanta does attract more blacks with at least a bachelor's degree or more than any othe metropolitan area. Lets break it on down shall we...

According to the Status of Metropolitan America study done by Brookings:

African Americans with degrees in metro Atlanta grew by 83% from 2000-2008! Compared to 40% for metro Atlanta overall. The growth rate for blacks holding a master's degree or more grew even more; by an astounding 125% from 2000-2008!

Metro Atlanta has the second highest number of African Americans holding degrees (275,000) after only New York (451,000), recently surpassing Washington, DC (250,000).

One in four (24%) metro Atlantans holding a degree is an African American, compared to 10% in metro New York and 15% in metro DC. Almost one out of ten African American adults hold at least a master's degree in metro Atlanta.

Lastly, 27% of African American adults hold at least a bachelors degree compared to 19% nationwide.
Great post...kudos!
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