U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-30-2010, 02:35 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,459,046 times
Reputation: 3545

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
That's because Houston and Dallas don't have the hilly terrain of Atlanta - it's as simple as that...plus the fact that many of Atlanta's oldest streets follow Native American or pioneer trails that went "pretty much any kind of way". And while we're at it, many other American cities are very similar to Atlanta in this respect. It's not a "shortcoming" of Atlanta (as I know you enjoy pointing these out) but an historical, charming characteristic that Houston and Dallas just don't have.
Why do people take offense so easily? Blame Atlanta's terrain if you want, but that's only part of it (as there are plenty of hilly American cities that are not built like Atlanta). The other is not expanding the roadways, or having so many one-lane roads (makes Atlanta feel country and smaller than it is, which can be a plus for those that like that feel). I looked at some of the plans, and they call for minimizing driveways and adding more turning lanes. That's a good start. And I do agree on the charming part (I did point out that aesthetically, Atlanta is tops in the nation), but if you want to pick "charm" over efficiently moving traffic in the region, that's you.

But, what other American cities are similar to Atlanta in "this respect"?

Quote:
Apparently you didn't see the grid system on the streets of Midtown and Downtown and in other areas of the city. The grids are there, but often are interrupted by a curving, meandering street like Peachtree that follows the Peachtree Ridge.
Apparently I didn't? Okay...

Obviously I did see that (and why wouldn't those areas be in a grid), but we're not talking about just the city of Atlanta here. The grids are there in the city (for the most part) but disappear quickly to those "Indian trails" (that you like to blame the infrastructure problem on), once you leave it. You're telling me Atlanta city leaders/planners couldn't improve on those routes before/during the big growth spurt?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-30-2010, 02:36 PM
 
4,228 posts, read 4,123,088 times
Reputation: 3191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
Yes, he does make sense. He doesn't even bash Atlanta in the article and does give Atlanta some props in there. What he wrote are honest things that Atlanta needs to improve on (and like I said, the arterial road system especially).
Dallas, Houston does too pointing Atlanta for this is pointless.

Quote:
Houston and Dallas WOULD NOT be doing just as bad. Go look at a map of Houston, Dallas, and Atlanta. Houston and Dallas are setup in a grid-like system (especially Houston). In Houston or DFW, you can take many roads across the entire metro area without getting on a freeway, or having to turn on another road (and again, Houston especially). Those two cities have better regional plans for their future and a lot of that is under construction now. Atlanta's roadways go pretty much any kind of way. The only straight shots are either US or Georgia State highways. Like what was presented in the article, there aren't many crosstown routes. That's one thing that always bugged me about Atlanta. Aesthetically, the roadways in Atlanta are some of the best in the nation, but they don't work efficiently.
I have google earth. Dallas and Houston are sprawl like Atlanta. Yes They have larger grid but Atlanta roads are small making walkability more Possible in New Urbanism. Than alot GA State freeways are main Roads! Most them have names like Buford HWY and etc than they're not only just cross city, but they are even cross counties.

Quote:
As for the recession, some metro areas went from negative domestic migration to positive (Pittsburgh), etc. And Atlanta's migration numbers have been dropping since 2006...before the recession. And do I think the growth rate will continue in Atlanta after the recession? Yes. I think Atlanta will start gaining anywhere between 1.5% to 1.9% growth rate. I don't think we'll be seeing the 2.7%+ gains we saw this decade and last in Atlanta anymore (or at least for some time), and that's not a bad thing. Atlanta's growth then was greatly propelled by the construction and real estate/speculation bubble. Will those bubbles reemerge greatly in the US economy again? I really don't think so. We're reaching a "green bubble" now, that will definitely help out the Texas two because of the energy industry. What industry is Atlanta going to emerge as a leader in this decade?
Atlanta drop to number 2 in 2006 woow! then all the Suddenly it went from 2nd in 2008 to 6th in 2009 it call the recession, noting but. Atlanta economy is diverse, the reason why the bubble hurt Atlanta is because so things were tied to it. For instance home depot is base here and one largest employers, and Atlanta has sizable financial industry here. One of thing Atlanta is growing is biotech and biomass is form of Engergy Show 14: Energizing Our Future do you really think leaders public and private are just setting looking at the clouds in Atlanta. Even if the bubble comes back the atlanta regional commission is discouraging sprawl now. And Atlanta will have a advantage being a logistic hub for the southeast.

Quote:
What do you believe will propel Atlanta back to what it was in the late 90s to mid-2000s?
For starter Atlanta has a history of evolving and changing, the didn't die after civil war, not after the decline of heavy industry like Birmingham, not during age suburbanization 1970 496,973 1990 394,017 but now 537,958. I never said Atlanta will grow at the rate it did in the 90s to mide 00s Atlanta is not going grow 130k to 150k yearly. But There's still Alot of investment in Metro Atlanta and by the mid 10s Atlanta more than likey will start growing atleast 100,000k
[/quote] That part I didn't agree with, but that doesn't mean the entire article is bad.

Quote:
Since you really want me to respond to that part of your post, I will:

It most definitely does, but let's not forget that the NC cities are getting big. Still, Atlanta is the same size as all of the major NC metro areas combined.
I know in one place too.

Quote:
Good example is Sony Ericsson.

But Atlanta is losing the highly skilled. The Brookings Institute came out with a report, and it showed Atlanta is losing big time with the high-end paying and mid-level paying workers. But, Atlanta is gaining in the low-skilled workers category.
Education center so highly skill workers will be around, the trick is get grads to stay.

Quote:
See above. I don't think the high-paying jobs number came out when the NY Times article was written a while back.
The NY article came out March.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2010, 03:13 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,459,046 times
Reputation: 3545
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Dallas, Houston does too pointing Atlanta for this is pointless.
Houston and Dallas have traffic problems, but their arterial road system is MUCH better than Atlanta. Those two cities are a couple of steps ahead when it comes to that. Those cities have multiple roadways that run parallel to the freeways to get you into town. Atlanta doesn't (like I said earlier, only US and State highways for Atlanta).

Quote:
I have google earth. Dallas and Houston are sprawl like Atlanta. Yes They have larger grid but Atlanta roads are small making walkability more Possible in New Urbanism.
From the Atlanta Regional Planning website: http://www.atlantaregional.com/File%...op_Sunbelt.pdf

So, Atlanta uses up more square miles than Houston and Dallas, but has less population. These are from 2000 though, as the new numbers don't come out until next year. Now, as far as Atlanta roads are small, amking them more walkable, I want to know what Atlanta roads you've been on. A lot of them don't even have sidewalks and are barely walkable.

Quote:
Than alot GA State freeways are main Roads! Most them have names like Buford HWY and etc than they're not only just cross city, but they are even cross counties.
I'm not sure what you're trying to say. Buford Highway is a state highway, which is what I was saying. The only crosstown roads in Atlanta are US or State highways.

Quote:
Atlanta drop to number 2 in 2006 woow! then all the Suddenly it went from 2nd in 2008 to 6th in 2009 it call the recession, noting but. Atlanta economy is diverse, the reason why the bubble hurt Atlanta is because so things were tied to it. For instance home depot is base here and one largest employers, and Atlanta has sizable financial industry here. One of thing Atlanta is growing is biotech and biomass is form of Engergy Show 14: Energizing Our Future do you really think leaders public and private are just setting looking at the clouds in Atlanta. Even if the bubble comes back the atlanta regional commission is discouraging sprawl now. And Atlanta will have a advantage being a logistic hub for the southeast.
And I'll say it again, a reason why Atlanta was hurt so badly was because the construction and real estate/speculation industries were a BIG part of the boom and why Atlanta grew as fast as it did. The growth you see now in Atlanta is how Atlanta will grow for a bit, IMO. It's healthy growth actually. I'm glad Atlanta is increasing its other industries, especially biotech, or other industries that don't suffer as much during a downtime in the economy.

Quote:
For starter Atlanta has a history of evolving and changing, the didn't die after civil war, not after the decline of heavy industry like Birmingham, not during age suburbanization 1970 496,973 1990 394,017 but now 537,958. I never said Atlanta will grow at the rate it did in the 90s to mide 00s Atlanta is not going grow 130k to 150k yearly. But There's still Alot of investment in Metro Atlanta and by the mid 10s Atlanta more than likey will start growing atleast 100,000k
Yes, the growth in the City of Atlanta this decade has been amazing. Atlanta gained back what it lost in the 90s, plus more. I don't think growing by 100K is out of the question. That's the kind of growth I'm talking about (85K-100K). It'll be interesting to see how the metro area grew this year to get a better picture.

Quote:
Education center so highly skill workers will be around, the trick is get grads to stay.
With the companies already in Atlanta, it really shouldn't be hard, but for some reason, Atlanta is losing those high/mid wage jobs. It's instead gaining a lot more low wage jobs.

Quote:
The NY article came out March.
Okay, thanks. Came out a couple of months before the high-paying jobs info came out.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2010, 03:51 PM
 
6 posts, read 8,862 times
Reputation: 17
The high skills issue may be a product of the type of corporation that is in Atl. Atlanta is not as progressive a place as some people would like to believe. NCR and Sony are fine enough companies, but they aren't cutting edge- they're too big. And that's what Atl has, huge firms that are slow. But by using Georgia Tech and creating and smaller, leaner ecosystem for growth the city may be able to change. As of now though, this isn't a city that breeds innovation which would demand and create high skilled labor.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2010, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,777,880 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pbc143 View Post
The high skills issue may be a product of the type of corporation that is in Atl. Atlanta is not as progressive a place as some people would like to believe. NCR and Sony are fine enough companies, but they aren't cutting edge- they're too big. And that's what Atl has, huge firms that are slow. But by using Georgia Tech and creating and smaller, leaner ecosystem for growth the city may be able to change. As of now though, this isn't a city that breeds innovation which would demand and create high skilled labor.
I beg to differ. Just two examples are Scientific Atlanta and Internet Security Systems. Both huge home grown success stories, now owned by Cisco and IBM, respectively.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2010, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
625 posts, read 912,065 times
Reputation: 227
Atlanta is not a good place to live for high-tech workers. The AJC, I believe, Is one of the only newspapers in the country without a technology section.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2010, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 11,777,880 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondandfun View Post
Atlanta is not a good place to live for high-tech workers. The AJC, I believe, Is one of the only newspapers in the country without a technology section.
What a ridiculous assertion, combined with hollow reasoning.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2010, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
625 posts, read 912,065 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
What a ridiculous assertion, combined with hollow reasoning.
The GA TEch area is a war zone, and has been in complete dilapidation for half a century. True, there are some startups that were spawned from tech grads, but it pales in comparison to about a dozen other cities (some of which are smaller) which I don't feel like naming because I give up on educating you.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2010, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
625 posts, read 912,065 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pbc143 View Post
The high skills issue may be a product of the type of corporation that is in Atl. Atlanta is not as progressive a place as some people would like to believe. NCR and Sony are fine enough companies, but they aren't cutting edge- they're too big. And that's what Atl has, huge firms that are slow. But by using Georgia Tech and creating and smaller, leaner ecosystem for growth the city may be able to change. As of now though, this isn't a city that breeds innovation which would demand and create high skilled labor.
Yeah, it's just a bunch of slow menial types of companies with lots of low wage workers combined with lots of corporate wanker types, nothing really on the cutting edge like you'll see in Boston or a handful of smaller cities like Raleigh.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2010, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,872,415 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondandfun View Post
The GA TEch area is a war zone, and has been in complete dilapidation for half a century. True, there are some startups that were spawned from tech grads, but it pales in comparison to about a dozen other cities (some of which are smaller) which I don't feel like naming because I give up on educating you.
LOL.You educate someone?That made my night!!!Georgia Tech a "war zone" "complete dilapidation for half a century?Lets see:
#4 in engineering schools overall
#7 Biomedical engineering
#5 in Aerospace aeronautical
#6 in mechanical engineering
etc...........
Looks like its really going downhill
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top