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Old 05-31-2010, 01:34 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,517,394 times
Reputation: 3545

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
You keep taking about straighter roads that cross cities, you said the mains roads that does this are the state highways in GA. MOST GA state highways like Buford highways are the main road. So it’s a straw man. Also Dallas road ways have more capacities because their "wider" the striaghtness is irrelevant. And what I'm trying to tells you, because roads are smaller in Atlanta with new urbanism Atlanta has the infrastructure to densify in a ways that Dallas and Houston cannot in term of walkabity. Dallas wide street grid layout vs. Atlanta small streets grid or not.
Most people would agree that a grid system is a much easier way to densify than roads that go any which way. And that's exactly my point (about the Buford Highway). Atlanta needs other roadways to take the traffic off of roads like the Buford Highway. The point is, there is not as much connectivity in Atlanta's roadway system, as there is in Houston and Dallas.

Quote:
Metro Atlanta 630/sq mi
Greater Houston 630.3/sq mi
DFW 634/sq. mi
Why are you posting the metro areas? Texas counties are large so the numbers are skewed. Urban areas are the best way to determine the density of an urban area (and it's what the Atlanta Regional Commission used). If you look at that, Atlanta has 1200+ less people per square mile than Houston and Dallas: http://www.atlantaregional.com/File%...op_Sunbelt.pdf

Quote:
But since your just talking about cores, grides and density, this is an New Urbanist project and it's dense while being anything but in a grid.

Atlanta - Google Maps

Atlanta - Google Maps
Okay? There are plenty of developments like these in Houston and Dallas. Also, I wouldn't say that what you posted is dense. Most suburban communities in Houston and Dallas are built like that (with how close the homes are to each other).

Quote:
The Atlanta beltline is largest single redevelopment project in the US That's at fact.
Atlanta BeltLine > Home
Yeah, the Beltline is a nice project.

Quote:
these are developments in Atlanta proper near the beltline,
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
these are views of areas being development near the beltline
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
these are developments else where in the 132.4 sq mi city limits.
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
And these are nice developments for Atlanta, too. No different than the things you see in Houston or Dallas though. Only difference is, the roadway system in the Texas two are in a more grid-like layout, which makes it more walkable with other developments near it (cohesive unit). It's not that way in Atlanta (for the most part).

Quote:
There is no Distinction from Hwys and main roads in Georgia. And you said "The only straight shots are either US or Georgia State highways" these are main crosstown straight shots. I put it this way the straight shots city roads in Texas would be Georgia State highways in Georgia. That's Why I said it's a straw man. It's kinda like cities in Texas are like Georgia counties.
The point is, Atlanta does not have very many crosstown roads. This puts a strain on the freeway and those existing crosstown roads. I think I understand what you're saying about the counties, but you can't put the blame on that. Well, you can actually. If there was better regional planning, then they could have all connected. Houston doesn't take up all of metro Houston, and Dallas definitely doesn't. But, those metro areas different cities/municipalities/etc., worked together with the roadway system. For example, with the growth out in the suburbs, roads are starting to connect to the city, from those suburbs (seeing this a lot lately in Houston).

Here is Houston's Regional Planning Map (and a lot of these are already completed): http://www.houstontx.gov/planning/DevelopmentRegs/docs_pdfs/2005_MTFP.pdf (broken link)

Can you not see the difference between that and what's in Atlanta?

Quote:
no like generally the home improvement industry, Financial and etc. If the housing market crash what does this do to companies like The Home Depot? And SunTrust not getting paid back housing loans.
And construction...

Quote:
Are you telling me Dallas media, financial, Education is on level of Atlanta? And Atlanta actually does has energy companies here like Southern Company, AGL Resources, and RaceTrac. Atlanta is just not to the scale of Texas cities in Energy. But Atlanta economy is more diverse than Dallas it’s just Dallas economy is larger.
Dallas can give Atlanta a run for its money in the financial industry. As for the media, Dallas is no slouch in that department. And those energy companies in Atlanta are nothing compared to what Dallas has (Exxon for one). Atlanta's economy really isn't more diverse than Dallas. I'd say Dallas is the most diverse, followed by Atlanta, and then Houston.

Quote:
It didn't say, it was an AJC article a few months back.
Do you at least have the AJC article?

Quote:
This is because ARC is more fuscous on live work play neighbors. And generally the quality of life now. But there’s a bright future for transposition next decade in Atlanta. Clayton county is likely to join Marta and a least the state pass a transposition bill. The state is looking for federal money for planning cross state high speed rail.
Well, this was a big part in the article that the OP posted. Atlanta was too focused on "now" and not "the present and future" while the boom was going on, unlike Houston and Dallas. And let's hope that Clayton County joins MARTA. It may be hard if there is no heavy rail extension into Clayton, but if MARTA promises that, I think it'll pass.

Quote:
Not mention most of beltline will be completed.
When?
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Old 05-31-2010, 01:47 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 17,886,172 times
Reputation: 2762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
Why do people take offense so easily? Blame Atlanta's terrain if you want, but that's only part of it (as there are plenty of hilly American cities that are not built like Atlanta). The other is not expanding the roadways, or having so many one-lane roads (makes Atlanta feel country and smaller than it is, which can be a plus for those that like that feel). I looked at some of the plans, and they call for minimizing driveways and adding more turning lanes. That's a good start. And I do agree on the charming part (I did point out that aesthetically, Atlanta is tops in the nation), but if you want to pick "charm" over efficiently moving traffic in the region, that's you.

But, what other American cities are similar to Atlanta in "this respect"?

Apparently I didn't? Okay...

Obviously I did see that (and why wouldn't those areas be in a grid), but we're not talking about just the city of Atlanta here. The grids are there in the city (for the most part) but disappear quickly to those "Indian trails" (that you like to blame the infrastructure problem on), once you leave it. You're telling me Atlanta city leaders/planners couldn't improve on those routes before/during the big growth spurt?
I didn't take offense to what you said...I just corrected you a little and told some of the reasons behind it. Why do YOU take offense to my action? You're incorrect, and it needs to be noted.

Boston is one of those cities without a consistent grid system. There are several others in the U.S. as well.

I have to laugh at Houston and Dallas being more walkable than Atlanta! That is honestly not a popular opinion of the two Texas cities...they consistently rank lower than Atlanta in this area. What I'm wondering after reading through this thread is...why are you SO obviously intent on proving that Atlanta isn't as good as Houston or Dallas? You keep comparing Atlanta to Texas cities in a transparent attempt to show the glories of Houston and Dallas, when that just isn't the topic of this thread - or any other thread in the Atlanta section. Are the Houston threads THAT boring?
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Old 05-31-2010, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,930,360 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
You keep taking about straighter roads that cross cities, you said the mains roads that does this are the state highways in GA. MOST GA state highways like Buford highways are the main road. So it’s a straw man. Also Dallas road ways have more capacities because their "wider" the striaghtness is irrelevant. And what I'm trying to tells you, because roads are smaller in Atlanta with new urbanism Atlanta has the infrastructure to densify in a ways that Dallas and Houston cannot in term of walkabity. Dallas wide street grid layout vs. Atlanta small streets grid or not.


Metro Atlanta 630/sq mi
Greater Houston 630.3/sq mi
DFW 634/sq. mi

But since your just talking about cores, grides and density, this is an New Urbanist project and it's dense while being anything but in a grid.

Atlanta - Google Maps

Atlanta - Google Maps

The Atlanta beltline is largest single redevelopment project in the US That's at fact.
Atlanta BeltLine > Home

these are developments in Atlanta proper near the beltline,
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
these are views of areas being development near the beltline
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
these are developments else where in the 132.4 sq mi city limits.
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps
Atlanta - Google Maps

Atlanta as got many other redevelopment project like the aerotropolis and fort mcpherson biotech and mix use projects.

There is no Distinction from Hwys and main roads in Georgia. And you said "The only straight shots are either US or Georgia State highways" these are main crosstown straight shots. I put it this way the straight shots city roads in Texas would be Georgia State highways in Georgia. That's Why I said it's a straw man. It's kinda like cities in Texas are like Georgia counties.

no like generally the home improvement industry, Financial and etc. If the housing market crash what does this do to companies like The Home Depot? And SunTrust not getting paid back housing loans.


Are you telling me Dallas media, financial, Education is on level of Atlanta? And Atlanta actually does has energy companies here like Southern Company, AGL Resources, and RaceTrac. Atlanta is just not to the scale of Texas cities in Energy. But Atlanta economy is more diverse than Dallas it’s just Dallas economy is larger.

It didn't say, it was an AJC article a few months back.

This is because ARC is more fuscous on live work play neighbors. And generally the quality of life now. But there’s a bright future for transposition next decade in Atlanta. Clayton county is likely to join Marta and a least the state pass a transposition bill. The state is looking for federal money for planning cross state high speed rail. Not mention most of beltline will be completed.


YouTube - HUD Visit: Secretary Shaun Donovan
gawd dangngit!!There you go again!!I cant say nuffin!!You always beat me to the punch and say everything that i would say and more.Stop that!!!LOLOLOL.Let them have it!!
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Old 05-31-2010, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,930,360 times
Reputation: 2908
Default Not so fast

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
Most people would agree that a grid system is a much easier way to densify than roads that go any which way. And that's exactly my point (about the Buford Highway). Atlanta needs other roadways to take the traffic off of roads like the Buford Highway. The point is, there is not as much connectivity in Atlanta's roadway system, as there is in Houston and Dallas.

You tout how Houston and Dallas have liberal annexation laws and how big its counties are.Yet you fail to see why having wide spaces like that is more necessary to have more roads that do connect from end to end.

Also you forget(perhaps intentionally that Atlanta Marta rail is far ahead of what Houston will have in the many years to come.Again one of those reasons is due to the smaller area.The fact that most of the city of Atlanta's urban growth has occurred around the MARTA stations to where ridership on MARTA is way up has also seemed to have been missed

Why are you posting the metro areas? Texas counties are large so the numbers are skewed. Urban areas are the best way to determine the density of an urban area (and it's what the Atlanta Regional Commission used). If you look at that, Atlanta has 1200+ less people per square mile than Houston and Dallas: http://www.atlantaregional.com/File%...op_Sunbelt.pdf


Whatever the reason for the numbers,most people that have been to either of these cities would easily say how overall Atlanta just feels more walk-able or urban.From this survey asking one of the question pertaining to "which has the highest percentage of people who walk to work".Atlanta is way ahead
AtL-6.5%/26th
DAL-5.4%/49th
HOU-4.8%/60th
2010 Quality Of Life Major Markets - Interactive Features - Portfolio.com

Okay? There are plenty of developments like these in Houston and Dallas. Also, I wouldn't say that what you posted is dense. Most suburban communities in Houston and Dallas are built like that (with how close the homes are to each other).

There are of course developments like these in TX also but your cities are much BIGGER.It takes longer to densify!!That's just a fact.Its because of the inability to Annexation that Atlanta has managed to grow at the rate it has

Yeah, the Beltline is a nice project.

And these are nice developments for Atlanta, too. No different than the things you see in Houston or Dallas though. Only difference is, the roadway system in the Texas two are in a more grid-like layout, which makes it more walkable with other developments near it (cohesive unit). It's not that way in Atlanta (for the most part).

The point is, Atlanta does not have very many crosstown roads. This puts a strain on the freeway and those existing crosstown roads. I think I understand what you're saying about the counties, but you can't put the blame on that. Well, you can actually. If there was better regional planning, then they could have all connected. Houston doesn't take up all of metro Houston, and Dallas definitely doesn't. But, those metro areas different cities/municipalities/etc., worked together with the roadway system. For example, with the growth out in the suburbs, roads are starting to connect to the city, from those suburbs (seeing this a lot lately in Houston).

YOU GUYS HAVE NO REAL RAIL SYSTEM.Yet you wanna talk about more roads?

Here is Houston's Regional Planning Map (and a lot of these are already completed): http://www.houstontx.gov/planning/DevelopmentRegs/docs_pdfs/2005_MTFP.pdf (broken link)

Can you not see the difference between that and what's in Atlanta?

And construction...

Dallas can give Atlanta a run for its money in the financial industry.NO.Atlanta has the only major commodity exchange in the entire South:Intercontinental Exchange (I.C.E.),companies like Invesco,Equifax,Suntrust,are just some others. As for the media, Dallas is no slouch in that department. And those energy companies in Atlanta are nothing compared to what Dallas has (Exxon for one).Slightly but dont play down Southern Company and Mirant. Atlanta's economy really isn't more diverse than Dallas. I'd say Dallas is the most diverse, followed by Atlanta, and then Houston. Wrong.
Atlanta leads in key segments where Houston and Dallas have a very small footprints.Like Higher Education,Non-Profits.

Do you at least have the AJC article?

Well, this was a big part in the article that the OP posted. Atlanta was too focused on "now" and not "the present and future" while the boom was going on, unlike Houston and Dallas. And let's hope that Clayton County joins MARTA. It may be hard if there is no heavy rail extension into Clayton, but if MARTA promises that, I think it'll pass.

When?
Already started.At least 2 or 3 parks completed,much of the trails and all of the right away has been purchased.
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Old 05-31-2010, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,891,605 times
Reputation: 1665
Interesting debate. I love when people say things like, my city has this many clubs, or this many shops, etc, and assume that matters to everyone. I think some of you are are so anxious to defend Atlanta against smaller individual cities you're missing the point, which is those cities in their totality are making an impact. Atlanta head to head against one may not be much competition. But that's not reality. Atlanta competes with them all combined, which gives people more options for places to live.

You folks might want to start looking for the forest beyond the trees, because this is what happens when people start to have more options than in years past...

1) North Carolina as a whole starts to attract more people than Georgia
Link: Newsroom: Population: Census Bureau: Texas Gains the Most in Population

2) In 2009 suddenly North Carolina has 13 Fortune 500 companies, the exact same number as Georgia
Link: Fortune 500 2009: States: California Companies - FORTUNE on CNNMoney.com

3) Smaller metros continue to outrank Atlanta when it comes to school performance
Link: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools tops big-city U.S. rankings - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/05/20/1447225/cms-tops-big-city-us-rankings.html - broken link)

4) The metro areas of Charlotte and Raleigh combined begain to retain more young professionals than Atlanta, and the state of NC as a whole starts to retain more people in general...



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Old 05-31-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,926,146 times
Reputation: 2698
I've not read through all 18 pages of this thread, but here are my thoughts.

One of the biggest differences between Atlanta and the other metros mentioned in the article is the relationship the city has with the state. It's almost a night and day contrast, and that's one thing that has severely hampered Atlanta whereas it's much less of an issue in Charlotte, RDU, Nashville, etc.

Secondly, it's good that the breakneck growth in Atlanta is starting to slow down a bit. It gives the city a chance to breathe, reassess some things, and build up/maintain infrastructure.

Thirdly, the entire Southeast as a region is simply maturing right now; hence, you have other cities getting into the game. That can only be seen as a good thing. Atlanta's certainly not going anywhere and will continue to grow and attract people.
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Old 05-31-2010, 05:34 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,517,394 times
Reputation: 3545
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Boston is one of those cities without a consistent grid system. There are several others in the U.S. as well.
But Boston has a top notch mass transit system, so it can get by with not having a grid. Atlanta doesn't (yet).

Quote:
I have to laugh at Houston and Dallas being more walkable than Atlanta! That is honestly not a popular opinion of the two Texas cities...they consistently rank lower than Atlanta in this area. What I'm wondering after reading through this thread is...why are you SO obviously intent on proving that Atlanta isn't as good as Houston or Dallas? You keep comparing Atlanta to Texas cities in a transparent attempt to show the glories of Houston and Dallas, when that just isn't the topic of this thread - or any other thread in the Atlanta section. Are the Houston threads THAT boring?
I was waiting on you, to try and come in and pull this card. I've gotten plenty of rep points from other Atlanta posters on my comments here, so I guess I what I'm saying is not so bad. I'm not even bashing Atlanta. What am I saying that's making you so upset and are so untrue? Or is it just because I'm from Texas and am talking about Atlanta?

As for the walkable rankings, Atlanta is better in pockets, but I'm saying overall, the Texas metros can become more walkable because of their layout.

Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
You tout how Houston and Dallas have liberal annexation laws and how big its counties are.Yet you fail to see why having wide spaces like that is more necessary to have more roads that do connect from end to end.

It seems that Houston is a bad example for this, but look at Dallas. It is completely surrounded by other cities, even though it has about 3x the amount of land in its city limits (compared to Atlanta). Still, the roads coming out from Dallas connect with the other roads in the surrounding suburban cities. Then it just continues with the grid like format. You don't see that in Atlanta.

Quote:
Also you forget(perhaps intentionally that Atlanta Marta rail is far ahead of what Houston will have in the many years to come.Again one of those reasons is due to the smaller area.The fact that most of the city of Atlanta's urban growth has occurred around the MARTA stations to where ridership on MARTA is way up has also seemed to have been missed

Yes, MARTA rail is ahead, but where are the plans for expansion? Houston at least has expansion plans currently under construction. It'll be hard for MARTA to get expansion, because heavy rail funding is much harder to get by nowadays.

Quote:
Whatever the reason for the numbers,most people that have been to either of these cities would easily say how overall Atlanta just feels more walk-able or urban.From this survey asking one of the question pertaining to "which has the highest percentage of people who walk to work".Atlanta is way ahead
AtL-6.5%/26th
DAL-5.4%/49th
HOU-4.8%/60th
2010 Quality Of Life Major Markets - Interactive Features - Portfolio.com
That's just the percentage of people that walk to work or work at home. As for what cities people think are more urban, that's debatable.

Quote:
There are of course developments like these in TX also but your cities are much BIGGER.It takes longer to densify!!That's just a fact.Its because of the inability to Annexation that Atlanta has managed to grow at the rate it has
What do you mean it takes longer to densify? We're not trying to make the entire city limits look like the urban core. Houston's core and Dallas' core have grown as much as Atlanta's this past boom. Atlanta is not unique in that regard, but all three cities should be proud of the growth in their core.

Quote:
YOU GUYS HAVE NO REAL RAIL SYSTEM.Yet you wanna talk about more roads?
But that's a moot point since the rail expansion is already under construction (30 more miles of rail for Houston), albeit delayed. Dallas actually just completed its second expansion, which doubled their light rail system.

Quote:
NO.Atlanta has the only major commodity exchange in the entire South:Intercontinental Exchange (I.C.E.),companies like Invesco,Equifax,Suntrust,are just some others.

I'll say it again, Dallas can give Atlanta a run for its money in the financial industry. Dallas has a Federal Reserve Bank (like Atlanta), as well as it's fair share of banking companies (like Comerica).

Quote:
Slightly but dont play down Southern Company and Mirant.

Slightly? Definitely not slightly. There is more than just Exxon in the Dallas area, too.

Quote:
Wrong.
Atlanta leads in key segments where Houston and Dallas have a very small footprints.Like Higher Education,Non-Profits.

Yeah, Atlanta does lead in those areas, but I don't see how I'm wrong. I think overall, the Dallas area has the most diverse economy, out of the three.
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Old 05-31-2010, 05:37 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 17,886,172 times
Reputation: 2762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
Interesting debate. I love when people say things like, my city has this many clubs, or this many shops, etc, and assume that matters to everyone. I think some of you are are so anxious to defend Atlanta against smaller individual cities you're missing the point, which is those cities in their totality are making an impact. Atlanta head to head against one may not be much competition. But that's not reality. Atlanta competes with them all combined, which gives people more options for places to live.

You folks might want to start looking for the forest beyond the trees, because this is what happens when people start to have more options than in years past...

1) North Carolina as a whole starts to attract more people than Georgia
Link: Newsroom: Population: Census Bureau: Texas Gains the Most in Population

2) In 2009 suddenly North Carolina has 13 Fortune 500 companies, the exact same number as Georgia
Link: Fortune 500 2009: States: California Companies - FORTUNE on CNNMoney.com

3) Smaller metros continue to outrank Atlanta when it comes to school performance
Link: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools tops big-city U.S. rankings - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/05/20/1447225/cms-tops-big-city-us-rankings.html - broken link)

4) The metro areas of Charlotte and Raleigh combined begain to retain more young professionals than Atlanta, and the state of NC as a whole starts to retain more people in general...


No one is comparing Atlanta to just one of NC's smaller metros - or any other smaller metros for that matter. We understand that Atlanta outranks these metros by several times, and that those aren't fair comparisons. It's usually other people that do the comparing, and get an argument going...like the one about Texas cities vs. Atlanta.

As for the number of F500 companies in NC...that isn't a new concept in NC - there have been F500 companies based in NC for many years. I'm not sure where you come up with the "suddenly" thing.

As for the school systems...which ones are you comparing? It certainly isn't fair to compare an entire metro school system to Atlanta Public Schools - try comparing whatever metro to Cobb, Fulton, or Gwinnett County schools and you'll have a remarkably different outcome.
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Old 05-31-2010, 05:39 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 17,886,172 times
Reputation: 2762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
But Boston has a top notch mass transit system, so it can get by with not having a grid. Atlanta doesn't (yet).
What does that have to do with anything? You're changing the subject - which was cities that don't have gridded streets. You asked for an example and I gave you one...and now you come back with an excuse for it. Whatever.

Compared to any city in Texas or the South, Atlanta HAS a top-notch mass transit system. No other system can even come close to touching MARTA, so what is your point?

It's so tiresome trying to educate the ignorant on MARTA's expansion plans. They are abundant, and all you have to do is a bit of research to find them. Go to the website and look into it and you'll shut up about it.
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Old 05-31-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,930,360 times
Reputation: 2908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
Interesting debate. I love when people say things like, my city has this many clubs, or this many shops, etc, and assume that matters to everyone. I think some of you are are so anxious to defend Atlanta against smaller individual cities you're missing the point, which is those cities in their totality are making an impact. Atlanta head to head against one may not be much competition. But that's not reality. Atlanta competes with them all combined, which gives people more options for places to live.

You folks might want to start looking for the forest beyond the trees, because this is what happens when people start to have more options than in years past...

1) North Carolina as a whole starts to attract more people than Georgia
Link: Newsroom: Population: Census Bureau: Texas Gains the Most in Population

2) In 2009 suddenly North Carolina has 13 Fortune 500 companies, the exact same number as Georgia
Link: Fortune 500 2009: States: California Companies - FORTUNE on CNNMoney.com

3) Smaller metros continue to outrank Atlanta when it comes to school performance
Link: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools tops big-city U.S. rankings - CharlotteObserver.com (http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/05/20/1447225/cms-tops-big-city-us-rankings.html - broken link)

4) The metro areas of Charlotte and Raleigh combined begain to retain more young professionals than Atlanta, and the state of NC as a whole starts to retain more people in general...



I don't think anyone would suggest that Atlanta is not being hampered in some small way by much smaller cities in the Southeast.You'd be an idiot to suggest otherwise.
New York even has cities like Boston,D.C. and even Atlanta at its door too.However New York will be New York always because it has cemented its position in every position.It leads in almost all of them.

Raleigh-Durham
Charlotte might as well be Buffalo and New York City.Fact is North Carolina has to deal with Virginia with its Hampton Roads and D.C. to Baltimore region.So the reality is that they all have bright futures but the level of field of play is vastly different.

As far as 500 companies,we all like to tout how many are where.A few of Atlanta;s largest have been gobeled up.Like Georgia Pacific,and Scientific-Atlanta.

Not to mention that 6 of the eight total of Georgia TOP PRIVATE Companies Headquarted in the U.S. are within the Top 100.Only 1 of North Carolina's broke the 100 mark at #58.Forty spots behind Georgia's number 18th company of Cox Enterprises.

North Carolina has 24 in the top 400.Atlanta has 29
top private companies - Google Search
As far as education goes.Charlotte lags behind Atlanta in High School graduation rates and degrees with a bachelors or higher citizens.Raleigh is a no brainer that it would rank higher in those categories.But hey choose one or the other!

2010 Quality Of Life Major Markets - Interactive Features - Portfolio.com

Basically these stats are good for Charlotte but its little when compared to the leagues that Atlanta plays in.For instance this recession is hurting Charlotte alot more than it hurting Atlanta.Just look at the unemployment rates at CHT 11.9% vs ATL 10.4.Both cities will bounce back but almost all economist agree that Atlanta is very diverse and pretty much a permanent fixture on the scene.
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