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Old 05-19-2010, 09:09 PM
 
2,250 posts, read 1,816,517 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
I do business in the Atlanta area and also spend time in Charlotte (heading there in the morning) and I can tell you that Charlotte is no Atlanta, at least from a business perspective. Not saying Atlanta is perfect, but comparing Nashville, Raleigh, or Charlotte is a bit overstated.
Ok Atlanta is the 2nd densest metro is the southeast so saying something about neighboring cities catching up, because of Atlanta sprawl is just hilarious. Than Atlanta still is growing faster than all it’s southeast neighbors during a slower growing period. What is even the premise of this article? what do you actually lose by moving to Charlotte or Nashville? LMAO Well Charlotte, and Nashville does sprawl more, their less congested because Atlanta is almost bigger than both of those Metros combine and double. It like saying what do you actually lose by moving to St Louis and Milwaukee when taking about Chicago?…. A lot! And coincidentally Chicago has more traffic issues than St Louis and Milwaukee I wounder why.

And here the icing on the cake. The article said Atlanta was growing at a par rate with Indianapolis and Columbus?

www.city-data.com/forum/city-vs-city/930136-fastest-growing-metro-areas-2009-official.html

Atlanta was the 6th largest gainer with 89,627 in 2009 this is consider slow for Atlanta, so ATL slowes down to still be faster growing than most metros. can say you pessimistic acticle.

Charlotte was 17th 39,055
Nashville was 25th 25,896

Indianapolis and Columbus are not even in top 25 what on earth is he or she was even talking about?
Quote:
Originally Posted by jurban8 View Post
Atlanta is left as a sort of “quarter way house” caught between its traditional sprawling self and a more upscale urban metropolis. It offers neither the low traffic quality of life of its upstart competition, nor the sophisticated urban living of a Chicago or Boston."

Overly pessimistic, or somewhat observant?
yes way Overly pessimistic. he or she could have said more sophisticated urban living than the upstart competition and low traffic quality of life than Chicago or Boston, not everyone rides the subway ) and they still have bad rush hours. Yeah some where what in the middle, so he or she decided to describe the glass as half empty.

look at this

Betting on Atlanta - Economix Blog - NYTimes.com

"What about Atlanta today? Surely, a city that depended so much on building should be poised for collapse. Certainly, Atlanta’s 10.1 percent unemployment rate reflects its eviscerated construction industry. Certainly, like many other places, Atlanta is in for a rough few years.

Yet there are three key reasons to think that Atlanta will weather this storm and continue to thrive."

1 "First, Atlanta benefits from the fact that it is the dominant agglomeration in the region. The continuing vitality of large cities is a remarkable feature of our age and Atlanta benefits from that fact."

2 "Atlanta also benefits from its business-friendly politics, which will continue to attract plenty of companies."

3 "Finally, Atlanta also benefits from being highly skilled — something that outsiders too often forget.

Nearly 43 percent of adults in the city of Atlanta have college degrees, as opposed to 27 percent in the nation as a whole, and 41 percent in Boston. The figure is even higher in surrounding Fulton County.

Skills have long led to urban success, especially when mixed with large urban size."
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 7,026,389 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefly View Post
Perhaps, but that's actually what they used to say about Detroit back when it was the default epicenter of American commerce. No reason to believe it will go that way so long as the already strained water supply doesn't dry up, but just be careful.
Again, we might as well be on a different planet from Detroit as far as comparing the economies of the two places - it's not even close. We have never been a one industry town, and have one of THE most diversified economies in the U.S.

I'm from the Great Lakes region originally, and I have never heard Detroit described as "the default epicenter of American commerce" in my life.

Our water supply is hardly strained, its politics. We, along with the rest of the Piedmont, suffered a 150 year draught. It's over, and has been for some time.
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:12 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island and Atlanta, GA
12,718 posts, read 18,667,409 times
Reputation: 5587
Sorry, not buying. He doesn't understand the mind of this city and what it has survived over its' 180 year history.
My general experience with journalists is that they are lazy researchers, under a deadline, and with a bent for sensationalism...so I tend to look at articles like this through a filter unless I'm familiar with their reputation.

Last edited by LovinDecatur; 05-19-2010 at 09:50 PM..
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
7,732 posts, read 7,026,389 times
Reputation: 2774
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Sorry, not buying. He doesn't understand the mind of this city and what it has survived over its' 180 year history.
Exactly. This place has always had something to prove, and that has not changed.

According to the article, that guy from Charlotte was quoted as saying "we have a huge chip on our shoulder."

Atlanta invented that kind of civic attitude, and it still exists as strong as ever.
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Midtown, Atlanta
128 posts, read 210,967 times
Reputation: 68
The website where I found this article has some very interesting pieces, but unfortunately the authors seem to be pessimists overall, especially when they're writing about the move back to the city and New Urbanism (you know anyone that supports more urban living is a socialist after all ). I definitely don't agree with what they say. So I'm not surprised this article was a little doomsday. Chiatldal - I saw that article also, and its a great rebuttal! Just goes to show some ppl see the glass half empty and the other way around.
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:18 PM
 
2,295 posts, read 3,139,135 times
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Add in professional sports teams. Atlanta has all 4 major sports, not to mention major college teams and Bowl games and soon the college football HOF.

Not everyone is a sports fan but all the best cities have teams and it helps create an identity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jurban8 View Post
Yeah when the guy asks what you lose by moving to Nashville or Charlotte, my mind starts thinking nightlife (however anemic), arts, diversity, shopping, restaurants, the list goes on.
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:23 PM
 
2,250 posts, read 1,816,517 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jurban8 View Post
The website where I found this article has some very interesting pieces, but unfortunately the authors seem to be pessimists overall, especially when they're writing about the move back to the city and New Urbanism (you know anyone that supports more urban living is a socialist after all ). I definitely don't agree with what they say. So I'm not surprised this article was a little doomsday. Chiatldal - I saw that article also, and its a great rebuttal! Just goes to show some ppl see the glass half empty and the other way around.
To the author, is the glass half empty or half full? LMAO

psdblog.worldbank.org
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Old 05-19-2010, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Arlington, Va
2,087 posts, read 1,867,408 times
Reputation: 1872
I sort of agree with the article. I think Atlanta had sort of a "peak" in the mid-nineties. It has been growing strong for the past several decades but hasn't done enough in response to it. In part, it's because of how balkanized Georgia politics are with an almost fanatical paranoia about local control. Better leadership on transit and infrastructure issues would have been nice in the early days. Marta was devised in the 60's and the system has hardly changed since the population has skyrocketed.

In my experience, this city is starting to lose its luster. Too many problems have been given lip service and this "phenominal growth" of intown hasn't brought many of the convieniences and amenities that make it worth it to put up with the hassle of city living. The city still talks a good game about how great it is but I still get hassled for money multiple times a day and huge piles of trash sit on crumbling sidewalks for weeks. It seems like the day-to-day quality of life issues are being ignored while another grand project, like the Streets of Buckhead fiasco, is paraded in front of us to distract us from this city's lingering problems.
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Old 05-19-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
8,014 posts, read 7,020,350 times
Reputation: 2331
Quote:
Originally Posted by BringBackCobain View Post
"this guy" needs to have some patience. Like he said, only as recently as 1950 Atlanta was a sleepy state capital. It takes time to turn that into a southern version of Chicago. Besides, it may be a good thing for Atlanta to see a slowdown in growth. We just passed a major transportation bill that will hopefully become law and allow us to catch up with the growth infrastructure-wise. Atlanta is a real estate town, so its current economic predicament is hardly surprising given the collapse of the real estate bubble. While I agree with the suggestions for improving the city, I think the article was overly pessimistic. I especially found irritating his mention that the city appeals only to blacks or gays. What evidence was he basing this on? I would think that Atlanta today has more appeal for more types of people than it has ever had in the past.

Atlanta's best days are ahead of it.
You made some good points,He obviously does not know the city well enough.How can the city become more white(and diverse) as more white people are moving in th ecity AND metro from other areas yet be attractive to only gays and blacks?

Also how many companys have move in the are in the last 5 years?
Newell Rubbermaid,NCR are just two off the top of my head.Companies do not uproot ther headquaters to a city that offers no more than their perceived counterparts.

Also you need only to look at other threads on here listing things like the cities with the most visitation from overseas travellers.Atlanta outside of Miami& Orlando(obviously) leads the South as recently as 2009:

Quote:
The cities most visited by overseas travelers in 2009 were New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, Orlando,San Francisco, Las Vegas, the District of Colombia, Honolulu,Boston and Chicago. Of the 20 city visitation estimates issued, 14 posted declines, 10 of which were double- digit declines. Of the six cities with increased visitation, Atlanta and Tampa/St. Petersburg posted the highest growth at seven percent and six percent, respectively.

http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/outreachpag...and_Cities.pdf

Last edited by afonega1; 05-20-2010 at 12:27 AM..
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Old 05-20-2010, 06:03 AM
 
7 posts, read 8,162 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Sorry, not buying. He doesn't understand the mind of this city and what it has survived over its' 180 year history.
My general experience with journalists is that they are lazy researchers, under a deadline, and with a bent for sensationalism...so I tend to look at articles like this through a filter unless I'm familiar with their reputation.
When yo say 'mind' do you mean the issues of cities and counties which want to break apart from Atlata and even the county which houses the city, such as the wealthy Sandy Springs and Johns Creek areas? Or how about that when people say they live in Atlanta, it really means they live in Decatur, or Smyrna, or acworth. Infact even the newly moved in corporations did not locate in "Atlanta". They are in other metro cities.

I too think growth has masked some very big problems and has been the only yardstick some Atlanta metro people used to judge the quality of the place.
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