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Old 05-20-2010, 01:06 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,098,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Whenever I lived in areas that weren't specifically Atlanta (Decatur and Dunwoody) I simply used Atlanta as my address anyway. The post office goes by zip code, so it doesn't affect your mail.
Exactly. I'm actually in Holly Springs, but have a Canton zip code, I can write Canton, Holly Springs, or Timbuktu on the envelopes, and it still gets there.
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:09 PM
 
2,676 posts, read 5,071,942 times
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I would Never have moved to Atlanta if I couldn't live in the city. Its very hip and many of us enjoy it. I don't hear the opposite opinion much except on this board. Many people I know who live in the burbs want to move into town (whether they are old or young).

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluepepper View Post
I think what Sklerty34 is saying is that in Atlanta living in the city (as opposed to in the metro area) isn't as desirable and/or isn't perceived as desirable. If that's the case, I absolutely agree.
.
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:20 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 32,098,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noah View Post
I would Never have moved to Atlanta if I couldn't live in the city. Its very hip and many of us enjoy it. I don't hear the opposite opinion much except on this board. Many people I know who live in the burbs want to move into town (whether they are old or young).
You're talking to a very select group then- there are plenty of us who are perfectly happy living out in the burbs, and wouldn't move into the city if you paid us to.

And when did the word "hip" become hip again?????
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Old 05-20-2010, 02:38 PM
 
2,676 posts, read 5,071,942 times
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Agree its not everyone but its more then a select few from what I have seen.

Two examples I personally know. One couple plans on moving intown as soon as the kids are done with school. The other is nearing retirement and live intown during the week and love being able to take advantage of everything the city has. Numerous others have commented on how they wish they lived intown.

Its worth noting that many parts of the city have a neighborhood feel and you wouldn't even know its in the city.

Its not for everyone but as others have noted the city has been growing fast for a reason.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
You're talking to a very select group then- there are plenty of us who are perfectly happy living out in the burbs, and wouldn't move into the city if you paid us to.

And when did the word "hip" become hip again?????
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Old 05-20-2010, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Maryland
37 posts, read 66,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
No. You're talking about a 1970's, 80's, and 90's Atlanta--and only those people who had a heavy "suburban" mentality.

Having an Atlanta address is actually very desirable--for many (young/hip, families, etc.).
In fact, the River's Call development (million dollar+ homes) near Wildwood in southern East Cobb/northern Cumberland area actually advertises..."a prestigious Atlanta address, with low Cobb County taxes."

And I know many people who were bummed when their new place fell on the non-Atlanta address side: in the case of the Cumberland/Vinings area--Atlanta vs. Smyrna; in the case of North Druid Hills/Emory--Atlanta vs. Decatur.
I don't disagree with that, but I do think it's a bigger deal in other cities to have the city mailing address than it is in the Atlanta area. It has also been my experience that there are more people who live in the suburbs and have no interest in the city itself because they think it's dirty or dangerous or whatever, even if their views are based on an Atlanta of 25 years ago. But, of course, that's all anecdotal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
I totally agree. In the 80s and 90s it was true that the City of Atlanta proper was not a desirable place for people to relocate to. That all changed in the 2000s. There is no clearer proof of that than the following:

City of Atlanta population in 2000: 416,000
City of Atlanta population in 2009: 540,000

One hundred and thirty thousand people dont move to a place in 10 years if it isn't desirable
Sure, but in that time the city's population went up 30%, but the metro area's went up 39%. The suburbs have been growing faster than the city itself.
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Old 05-20-2010, 02:52 PM
 
4,229 posts, read 4,115,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluepepper View Post
I think what Sklerty34 is saying is that in Atlanta living in the city (as opposed to in the metro area) isn't as desirable and/or isn't perceived as desirable. If that's the case, I absolutely agree.

Look at Washington, New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, etc - in all those places having the city itself on your mailing address is a really big deal and, speaking as a fairly young person, it's considered hip to live in the city rather than near it. In Atlanta I think there are more people who like the Atlanta area, as opposed to the city itself; in fact, I think there are a lot who have the stance that they only go in the city when they have to and don't understand why people live there.
Is any of the bolded city, sunbelt cities? Sunbelt cities are built different from the northeast and west coast cities you know that. Look at Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, San Diego and etc they all are over a million people and they all are over 300,000 sq mi. If they was less than 150 sq mi like Atlanta they would also be less than 600,000 people like Atlanta.

Only 1/10 of Metro Atlanta doesn’t stay in Atlanta because Atlanta is less desirable LMAO it’s because the city limits is small for Sunbelt cities BTW. By your sense people must really love jacksonville because not to many folks stay in the suburbs their ) So Again Atlanta and it’s inter suburbs is consider Atlanta on the account Atlanta city limits is smalls and Atlanta is sunbelt city.

With saying that. not even the full metro

Fulton County 535 sq mi 1,020,104
Gwinnett County 437 sq mi 808,167
DeKalb County 271 sq mi 747,274
Cobb County 345 sq mi 714,692
Clayton County 144 sq mi 273,718

Metro Atlanta 5 county core
3,563,955 in 1,732 sq mi

Minneapolis – Saint Paul metro
3,275,041 in 6,364 sq mi

Pittsburgh metropolitan,
2,354,957 in 5,706 sq mi

Seattle metropolitan
3,344,813 in 5,894 sq. mi

Greater St. Louis
2,816,710 in 8,846 sq mi

This is Interesting a sunbelt city Atlanta’s 5 county core is more populated than the entire twin city area alone. But it don’t stop there Atlanta 5 county core is only 1,732 sq mi while the twin city area is 6,364 sq mi 4x larger in area, which means Atlanta is incredibly more denser.

And I come to the realization that there is only 10 other metro areas that are denser than Atlanta, in the mist of all the sprawl bashing on ATL when it’s actually the 11th densest metro.

Last edited by chiatldal; 05-20-2010 at 03:01 PM..
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Old 05-20-2010, 02:55 PM
 
1,498 posts, read 2,545,321 times
Reputation: 550
I agree about the city being hip, or more broadly "intown", especially now and especially with my generation (gen Y). I was at dinner with a group of friends, and one guy, orginally from Birmingham, had just got a job in Perimeter Center. He said he was looking at apartments in Perimeter, and everyone wondered why. The general consensus was that he should to live in Buckhead, and if not Buckhead then Brookhaven, and if not there then Briarcliff. I know that a lot of young people do live in those apatments around Perimeter, but I really dont know anyone who does and I wouldnt consider living there. Nothing against the area - I grew up around there - but the zietgiest right now is definitely to live intown. Whether that is Midtown, westside, eastside, Buckhead, Druid Hills, Decatur, Brookhaven, or even downtown Chamblee depends on the person, but it seems they all have more "hipness" with cool people in thier 20s than a suburban area like Perimeter Center. Im not sure that was the case 15 years ago.
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Old 05-20-2010, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 12,858,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluepepper View Post
I think what Sklerty34 is saying is that in Atlanta living in the city (as opposed to in the metro area) isn't as desirable and/or isn't perceived as desirable. If that's the case, I absolutely agree.

Look at Washington, New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, etc - in all those places having the city itself on your mailing address is a really big deal and, speaking as a fairly young person, it's considered hip to live in the city rather than near it. In Atlanta I think there are more people who like the Atlanta area, as opposed to the city itself; in fact, I think there are a lot who have the stance that they only go in the city when they have to and don't understand why people live there.
The point is that Atlanta had that stigma,so did ALL major cities around the same time.Do you people not remember NYC was near bankrupt in the early 1990's?New York was a horrible place.
The article is called :The Decline of New York
The Decline Of New York - TIME

Read the article to see how bad it was.No one wanted to live in the city like they do today.Atlanta has NEVER been as bad as most cities have been /are.Philly was even worse.Baltimore?Forget it!D.C.?OMG!!How do you guys think those suburbs became so popular overnight?D.C.sprawls into 3 states!Why?Because many did not and do not want to live in the city.

Its seems even among us who like living in Atlanta,we accept a double standard.As if a city so new and up and coming should not be allowed courtesy or a pass.
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Old 05-20-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Maryland
37 posts, read 66,624 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Is any of the bolded city, sunbelt cities? Sunbelt cities are built different from the northeast and west coast cities you know that. Look at Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, San Diego and etc they all are over a million people and they all are over 300,000 sq mi. If they was less than 150 sq mi like Atlanta they would also be less than 600,000 people like Atlanta.

Only 1/10 of Metro Atlanta doesn’t stay in Atlanta because Atlanta is less desirable LMAO it’s because the city limits is small for Sunbelt cities BTW. By your sense people must really love jacksonville because not to many folks stay in the suburbs their ) So Again Atlanta and it’s inter suburbs is consider Atlanta on the account Atlanta city limits is smalls and Atlanta is sunbelt city.

With saying that. not even the full metro

Fulton County 535 sq mi 1,020,104
Gwinnett County 437 sq mi 808,167
DeKalb County 271 sq mi 747,274
Cobb County 345 sq mi 714,692
Clayton County 144 sq mi 273,718

Metro Atlanta 5 county core
3,563,955 in 1,732 sq mi

Minneapolis – Saint Paul metro
3,275,041 in 6,364 sq mi

Pittsburgh metropolitan,
2,354,957 in 5,706 sq mi

Seattle metropolitan
3,344,813 in 5,894 sq. mi

Greater St. Louis
2,816,710 in 8,846 sq mi

This is Interesting a sunbelt city Atlanta’s 5 county core is more populated than the entire twin city area alone. But it don’t stop there Atlanta 5 county core is only 1,732 sq mi while the twin city area is 6,364 sq mi 4x larger in area, which means Atlanta is incredibly more denser.

And I come to the realization that there is only 10 other metro areas that are denser than Atlanta, in the mist of all the sprawl bashing on ATL when it’s actually the 11th densest metro.
I find this data interesting, but I don't think it has that much to do with my point, which is that, based on my experience, people in the Atlanta area are less determined to have an that city mailing address than people in other cities. It doesn't have anything to do with population density, I just think there's a combination of people who hold the idea of what Atlanta was decades ago and people who don't care what their mailing address says. I live in the DC area right now and there are people who live in not-so-nice areas with a bunch of roommates because they want the DC address; my fiance knows people who do the same thing in New York, and my parents knew people who did the same thing in San Francisco.

It's not really fair to compare the cities I listed with the ones you listed because those weren't the ones I was talking about. The pool of cities I was drawing the comparisons from was Washington, New York, Boston, Chicago, and San Francisco; the pool you used is St. Louis, Pittsburgh, the Twin Cities, Seattle, and Jacksonville. The pools aren't all that similar.

If you'd asked me whether people in Atlanta were more likely than people in Pittsburgh or St. Louis to want to live in the city than around it, I'd have said 'yes'. But I don't perceive the desire to be as strong as it is in other areas, because Atlanta isn't as sexy a name to drop as those other places. The reality is that if you tell people you live/lived in/are moving to/grew up in Washington or New York or Boston or San Francisco they're interested because they perceive those places as being hip and interesting. Atlanta has that perception more so than St. Louis or Pittsburgh, but not as much as the cities I'd originally listed, at least in my experience.

Is is good or bad? I don't know it's really either, I think it just is. Personally I like it. It's like knowing about a restaurant with a great atmosphere, world-class food, and reasonable prices that you can always get a table at, while other people are shoulder-to-should in to a more expensive place that isn't any better. On the one hand you want to tell them about the place you go to because it's so great; on the other hand you're hoping they don't find out because you don't want your favorite spot to become overcrowded and expensive. Basically, other people can be ridiculous and cram themselves in to New York and Washington and pay obscene rents and mortgages and I'll just be hanging out in Atlanta with the sweet weather, cheap houses, and lower population density.

Last edited by bluepepper; 05-20-2010 at 03:53 PM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 05-20-2010, 03:53 PM
 
7 posts, read 10,855 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluepepper View Post
I think what Sklerty34 is saying is that in Atlanta living in the city (as opposed to in the metro area) isn't as desirable and/or isn't perceived as desirable. If that's the case, I absolutely agree.

Look at Washington, New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, etc - in all those places having the city itself on your mailing address is a really big deal and, speaking as a fairly young person, it's considered hip to live in the city rather than near it. In Atlanta I think there are more people who like the Atlanta area, as opposed to the city itself; in fact, I think there are a lot who have the stance that they only go in the city when they have to and don't understand why people live there.
Not only the issue of people not liking living in Atl city, very few can justify living in an old, small home and sending their kids off to school in the city. The people I know feel very 'screwed' for lack of a better word as their kids brome school age and the value of tHier hip house has fallen. That's when te move to Suwanee becomes mission number 1, not the new club on 14th. Some of these posts here show just how out of touch some Atlantans are, they can't see the improvements that need to be made.

But nevermind all of that, Atlanta has had a remarkable run. But this isn't the first time. Atlanta did Infact breakdown after it's first run, well all see what happens this time.
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