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Old 05-28-2010, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Lindbergh (Atlanta, GA)
126 posts, read 271,822 times
Reputation: 64

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsonga View Post
You act like a grown adult, and get what you need done. If that means rent, get a ride, walk, or whatever, you get it done. This is a very odd thread...
I concur. Not sure what else could be said.

 
Old 05-28-2010, 06:38 AM
 
2,676 posts, read 5,071,217 times
Reputation: 911
3 cars just for the rare breakdown, wow. Doesn't seem like a good way to tie up your money (cost of car, insurance etc). Curious how this only applies to those living in the suburbs in the south. Why the south?

We've had this happen in the last few years a few times and my spouse and I shared a car one time (dropped off and picked them up) and another time got a ride from coworkers. Its not fun but its totally workable even if your not near transit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterNY View Post
Great advice.. Take care of your car, and it will take care of you...(in theory..)


I honestly believe for a family (hubby/wife and kids) living in the suburbs in the South, there should always be a 3rd car, a beater, if anything. Something cheap (to maintain and cheap on gas), affordable, and reliable (Civic, Accord, Camry, Corolla).

If the main car breaks down, it's not an inconvenience for anyone.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 07:12 AM
 
Location: East Cobb
2,206 posts, read 5,946,487 times
Reputation: 906
Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
Atlanta doesn't have great mass transportation, but alternatives do exist. They may not be ideal in terms of schedule, route, or time, but they're available in a pinch.
This is indeed a weird thread. But anyway, from my home in solidly suburban north-east Cobb (I'm trying to indicate I'm not in a rural area by any stretch) it's more than six miles to either of the two nearest transit stops of any kind. (MARTA bus service on Alpharetta Highway or Cobb County Transit at Roswell Rd and Johnson Ferry). In my part of the suburbs, mass transit is really not "available in a pinch", it's just plain non-existent. If you rent or purchase a home around here, you're quite obviously signing up for a completely automobile-dependent lifestyle.

A side note on the effects of the auto-dependent lifestyle: My 16 year-old just recently got a driver's license and has been reveling in new-found freedom of movement in these early days of the school summer holidays. It's struck me that while at her age, I'd been independently going downtown, to the gym, the library, the movies, etc. by public transportation on a regular basis for at least a couple of years, teens around here are kept in a delayed state of dependency by the lack of public transit and the spread-out nature of the suburbs, until they are granted driving privileges.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 07:41 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,794 posts, read 11,724,981 times
Reputation: 5394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmony200 View Post
What happens if you are not living close to the Marta or CCT?
If you don't live close to MARTA then you don't live in Atlanta. You live in "Greater Atlanta". Like someone said, you do the same thing that people have to do when they live in any other suburban area with infrequent or non-existent public transportation.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 07:54 AM
 
143 posts, read 294,128 times
Reputation: 108
I agree with others that have said that this is a weird thread - I'm not sure that the answer to the OP's question is any great leap of logic.

Some car insurance pays for a rental, some people pay out of pocket if they don't live near public transportation, and if you can't afford that, then I hope you've got good friends. It's the exact same set of options that millions of people across the country have when their cars break down. The comprehensive mass transit that places like NYC have is the exception, not the rule, in most places in America. Even then, those services only help the people that are commuting within the city or from the suburbs into the city - if you're commuting suburb to suburb in New York, I'm nearly positive that your options are going to be very similar to the ones you have in non-MARTA areas of metro Atlanta.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 21,889,791 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmony200 View Post
I am a transplant form NY. If our cars break down, we have access to the bus and train the get to work. We have no excuses. What happens if your car breaks down in ATL? How do people get to work? Do they have to rent a car? What happens if they decide to fix their car, do you not got to work until your car is fixed? I would love to hear your stories.
My wife and I carpool.

For service in cases where the car is drivable, the dealer we generally use provides a free shuttle service. Quite convenient.

I can also telecommute for a length of time if need be, so it really isn't that big a deal. If my wife's car were to be out of commission for several days, we'd either rent or use whatever the insurance company is willing to pay for.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Duluth, GA
32 posts, read 61,293 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmony200 View Post
I am a transplant form NY. If our cars break down, we have access to the bus and train the get to work. We have no excuses. What happens if your car breaks down in ATL? How do people get to work? Do they have to rent a car? What happens if they decide to fix their car, do you not got to work until your car is fixed? I would love to hear your stories.
You could always use a taxi cab service or carpool with a co-worker that may live close to your area of residence!
 
Old 05-28-2010, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
11,876 posts, read 45,659,960 times
Reputation: 12996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmony200 View Post
I am a transplant form NY. If our cars break down, we have access to the bus and train the get to work. We have no excuses. What happens if your car breaks down in ATL? How do people get to work? Do they have to rent a car? What happens if they decide to fix their car, do you not got to work until your car is fixed? I would love to hear your stories.

It's a trick question, right?
The validity of the question is suspect at best-
You "New Yorkers" always think you got something on us "Southerners".

We "Southerners" have an affinity with the automobile (aka- "car") so public transportation was a short-coming. As with all things- hindsight is 20/20.
As for myself, I'll loose the affinity when they pry my cold-ass fingers from the wheel!
And I also turn my own wrenches.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,892 posts, read 9,584,447 times
Reputation: 5303
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
It's a trick question, right?
The validity of the question is suspect at best-
You "New Yorkers" always think you got something on us "Southerners".

We "Southerners" have an affinity with the automobile (aka- "car") so public transportation was a short-coming. As with all things- hindsight is 20/20.
As for myself, I'll loose the affinity when they pry my cold-ass fingers from the wheel!
And I also turn my own wrenches.
This really hasn't always been the case. My mom relates stories of taking the train all over the south, my grandmother was a single working woman in the early 20th century, took the street car from East Atlanta to downtown -- she worked as a bookkeeper in the Hurt Building -- saw the great fire of Atlanta in 1917 from her office window:

Great Atlanta fire of 1917 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sorry for the rabbit trail about the fire, but she could get all around Atlanta on the street cars. They did not own a car at all until after she married my grandfather and moved to Florida in the 20s.

If hindsight needs to be appropriated, lets look to the 50s and 60s when these systems fell into disuse because of our love affair with the automobile. But saying southerner's never had use for mass transportation systems is a misnomer.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 03:42 PM
 
180 posts, read 442,393 times
Reputation: 108
Slightly OT... I read an article years ago, written by an elderly lady (I want to say it was Celestine Sibley but I can't be sure), in which she recounted how when she was a girl living in Atlanta proper, her family had a vacation home in Roswell and it would take half a day to get from Atlanta to Roswell using whatever mode of transportation they had then (horse & buggy? Model T?)

I laughed and thought... heck it takes that long TODAY using modern cars!

To OP. Yes it's nice to have a good public transportation network. I grew up in a city that had an incredible one (Bombay), although it was heavily overloaded even when I was a kid. Very few people could afford cars, and when I went away at the age of 22 I barely knew how to drive, as I almost never had the chance. Almost needless to say, I did not own a car, though we were upper middle-class. My father had one but HE used it. But I knew nearly every street of that massive city, and had memorized well over 30 separate bus routes and dozens of train stations. I got EVERYWHERE by public transport. I also stayed damned fit through the sheer effort of fighting to get onto buses and trains, traversing platforms at all times of day, walking when the bus was late, hanging off trains by one hand, etc. It was so cheap I didn't even need much of an additional allowance over the paltry sum I got for movies or lunch. I also nearly died a few times, and witnessed others who weren't so lucky.

I was slightly stunned to come to the US and find that the fables I had heard were in fact true... that 16 year-olds in moderate income families had their own cars!

Some cities, and Atlanta may be the best example of this, just don't have a good network and probably never will. It has some of its reasons in its topography, or at least I think so. But lately, politics and money play a big part. We who live here deal with it in the ways mentioned in previous posts.
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