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Old 09-07-2010, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Austin
2,522 posts, read 3,381,056 times
Reputation: 675
Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
Nah. I am less gloom and doom. Austin is much nicer than it was when I moved here in 2001. Cities that don't grow and change die. Cool hip areas are always moving. 10-15 years ago, South Congress was the closest thing Austin had to a red light district - kinda like Rundberg is now - it had 10 years of coolness and is now a yuppie parody of itself. Clarksville looked like it was great in the 80s - now it has priced itself out of interestingness. Austin still attracts plenty of young artists, musicians, writers, artisans - they mostly end up on the near east side, which is where the old Austin you are all so nostalgic for thrives in a different incarnation. Austin is seeing a culinary explosion. There are now 1500 or so food carts in the city - some truly excellent, and they carry the same creative, DIY ethos that put the city on the cultural map. Sure there is no more Armadillo World Headquarters, but can you imagine how tragic it would be to have the same old people there doing the same old thing. The older we get the better we used to be. Do I hate some of the things happening to Austin? Of course - the paving over of the Hill country, the strip mallification of surrounding old towns like Round Rock. I was sad when Bookwoman had to move from 12th and Lamar but am delighted that ghastly excuse for a Jewish deli on 6th St is closing. Barton Springs is still beautiful. You might want to get out of 78703 more, but even if you don't, drag yourself off to Donn's Depot or Deep Eddy Cabaret or the Mean Eyed Cat or watch the sunset from the Dry Dock Bar on Mt. Bonnell. Austin just has more layers than it had before, some of them awful, some of them fantastic and same of them kinda what they always were.
I think its more the TRAFFIC and the pace of change...traffic more than anything, and pace of change slightly less so. Sure, Austin has become a bit more cosmopolitan per its growth. We aren't expecting it to become Manhattan Southwest, but indeed, the restaurant scene is far more dynamic, and such. We have the Long Center, for higher end performing arts, which was sorely needed. No Pro teams yet, and no large outdoor arena like SA, but that may come in time as well.....

What do we have now? Well, this poster mentioned the yuppification of Austin, and, though I would call it the corporatization/commodification/selling of Austin, I agree that much of the uniqueness and bite has been "blanded over"...along with all the blahness of the malling of much of the outskirts and NW Austin...

You can't please everyone...when you grow and double in size in 19 years, something has to give and be compromised...it turns out that most of that growth was in the outlying areas, and turned the Austin metro into, as a whole, a far more nondescript metro, with the same big box stores all over the region, and far fewer unique places....and that itself is the price of rapid change....a bunch of high rise condos, old areas and residents being priced out, and a yuppification of much of the central area....all in all, not a good thing at all, and I can understand 100% why long-timers pine for the days before they essentially "Paved" over the old Austin and "put up a parking lot".....
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:12 PM
 
352 posts, read 469,079 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa78703 View Post
I wouldn't say that I'm tired of Austin or bored with it, but it's not the city I remember from my youth. Austin used to be a really cool mid-sized city with color and hippie flair. Lots of rough edges, but it had a distinct uniqueness compared to most cities its size. Back in the day, comparatively speaking, Austin was weird. Almost everyone I met was interesting. Now I see the old Austin that I knew becoming engulfed by a sort of White Bread sensibility. "Gentrified" isn't quite the word I'm looking for, but old Austinites know what I mean. Many of us have seen Austin institutions close down one by one. All of these things that gave Austin color and life have been pushed to the wayside.

I think that in another ten years or so, the cool, hip areas of Austin won't be so cool and hip anymore. Central Austin will have the same feel of Round Rock, Cedar Park, Sugarland, Plano, or any other nondescript cookie cutter 'burb, only with bigger trees, more unique architecture and a view of Lady Bird Lake. But Austin will never have the same personality that it had 30+ years ago. I don't see it attracting the same demographic, either. No more artisans, writers, musicians, or other creative types. It's an ugly side-effect of growing too quickly and attracting the wrong kind of people. And it's heartbreaking, but it is what it is when a city accommodates the masses.
"Wrong kind of people"? Good Lord. How elitist is that? Do tell us, who are the right kind of people? Life changes, cities evolve!

Does this forum have a moderator? We've been drug out to the Davis Mountains by the Realtor, and now we're once again pining for old Austin--neither of which had to do with my original post.

I've lived here since '92. I'm glad that many of you are still in love with Austin--at most I had a crush. I've just outgrown her and an ready to move. I'll be making room for all the new people the Chamber of Commerce (or who ever does this incessant recruiting) is advertising for.

A big thank you to the insightful posters who answered my question--some very interesting opinions.

Last edited by lemonlime22; 09-07-2010 at 04:13 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
15,935 posts, read 20,950,994 times
Reputation: 11809
Your original question was: Are you bored with or tired of Austin? The answer for some appears to be yes, for others a resounding no, for others, yes but, for others, no but (which is where the "pining for old Austin" comes in, I'd think, in response to the original question). Pretty much what one would expect on a forum like C-D, and pretty much like real life.

If you wish to be elsewhere, that's where you should be, of course. That would seem to be a given.
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:38 PM
 
352 posts, read 469,079 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Your original question was: Are you bored with or tired of Austin? The answer for some appears to be yes, for others a resounding no, for others, yes but, for others, no but (which is where the "pining for old Austin" comes in, I'd think, in response to the original question). Pretty much what one would expect on a forum like C-D, and pretty much like real life.

If you wish to be elsewhere, that's where you should be, of course. That would seem to be a given.
Well I never asked about West Texas or the Davis mountains--the question was about AUSTIN. To hijack a thread to that extent is, let's just say NOT Texas friendly.
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
15,935 posts, read 20,950,994 times
Reputation: 11809
My apologies, I was responding to a particular comment from someone who posted to this thread.

What would you have preferred in the way of discourse in response to your question? Yes or no? Only yes? In that case, perhaps a poll would have been more controllable.

It's a very interesting question (is the city itself boring, or is it individuals who are bored with it, and in either case, why), after all, and is likely, like conversation in real life, to stray a bit here and there on its way, as comments and questions and responses to it bring up thoughts among the participants. Odd how that happens online just as much as it does in real life.

But if it really disturbed you so much, again, my apologies.
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
308 posts, read 795,531 times
Reputation: 59
why is that not about Austin? For a city, isn't it important what kind of resources are available if extended a certain miles?
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemonlime22 View Post
Well I never asked about West Texas or the Davis mountains--the question was about AUSTIN. To hijack a thread to that extent is, let's just say NOT Texas friendly.
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:18 PM
 
1,128 posts, read 1,150,757 times
Reputation: 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthecut View Post
You can't please everyone...when you grow and double in size in 19 years, something has to give and be compromised...it turns out that most of that growth was in the outlying areas, and turned the Austin metro into, as a whole, a far more nondescript metro, with the same big box stores all over the region, and far fewer unique places....and that itself is the price of rapid change....a bunch of high rise condos, old areas and residents being priced out, and a yuppification of much of the central area....all in all, not a good thing at all, and I can understand 100% why long-timers pine for the days before they essentially "Paved" over the old Austin and "put up a parking lot".....
The rapid growth was a huge part of the problem, IMHO. Austin essentially lacked the infrastructure to support such a big population boom, which is why traffic is so godawful. Two major N-S thoroughfares (Loop 1 and IH-35) can't cut it. I think that problem is being slowly resolved by adding more circular routes around the city. (Hopefully, more people will start riding the lightrail, too.)

But, when growth occurs so quickly, there's not going to be a lot of thought placed into the long-term outcome. Get those high rises and subdivisions up, chop-chop! Doesn't matter if they're eyesores. The last well thought-out building to go up downtown was the Frost Bank Building, which I think is really gorgeous. (Unfortunately, I can't even see it anymore because of inoccuous-looking high-rises.) What Round Rock, Pflugerville, etc. choose to do is their business. But Austin's city council (and their planning division) have disappointed me over the years. I used to cover the city beat when I worked for the newspaper, and even then I noticed that their allegiance seems to lie more with big out-of-state developers rather than the people of Austin.
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:53 PM
 
650 posts, read 705,102 times
Reputation: 556
In answer to the original question, a resounding yes. After 25 years, more than ready to move somewhere else. Unlike the song, when I die please don't let me die a Texas.
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX!!!!
3,729 posts, read 5,067,191 times
Reputation: 1656
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobert View Post
"When a man is tired of Austin, he is tired of life"

- Jobert (1978- )
LOL.

Nope, I'm not tired of it. Being an old broad, and having lived many places, I like it here because I was looking for a slower pace. So I imagine my expectations are quite a bit different than the OPs.
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Austin
2,522 posts, read 3,381,056 times
Reputation: 675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa78703 View Post
The rapid growth was a huge part of the problem, IMHO. Austin essentially lacked the infrastructure to support such a big population boom, which is why traffic is so godawful. Two major N-S thoroughfares (Loop 1 and IH-35) can't cut it. I think that problem is being slowly resolved by adding more circular routes around the city. (Hopefully, more people will start riding the lightrail, too.)

But, when growth occurs so quickly, there's not going to be a lot of thought placed into the long-term outcome. Get those high rises and subdivisions up, chop-chop! Doesn't matter if they're eyesores. The last well thought-out building to go up downtown was the Frost Bank Building, which I think is really gorgeous. (Unfortunately, I can't even see it anymore because of inoccuous-looking high-rises.) What Round Rock, Pflugerville, etc. choose to do is their business. But Austin's city council (and their planning division) have disappointed me over the years. I used to cover the city beat when I worked for the newspaper, and even then I noticed that their allegiance seems to lie more with big out-of-state developers rather than the people of Austin.
Melissa, I have a good question for you..what city enhanced itself by large, rapid growth? Has any city anywhere ever done that? Or, another way of putting it, what city has experienced a huge growth in population, and maintained the ambience of old? probably none...put it this way, if Austin did it, it would be the first to become a far better city and increase its unique ambience by growing hugely...
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